Fall 2013 Calendar of Events

Applications of Network Science to Environmental Policy (Mark Lubell)

Applications of Network Science to Environmental Policy (Mark Lubell)

September 17, 2013 7:30 PM  – 8:30 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

Professor Mark Lubell, Director of the Center for Environmental Policy and Behavior at the University of California-Davis, will share lessons learned from more than 15 years conducting economics valuation research to inform public policy decisions. He will speak about social networks as core components of policy processes and individual decision-making. The emerging field of network science is developing theories and methods for studying networks in empirical settings. This talk will provide an overview of the application of network science to public policy, including case studies of water management, sustainable viticulture, and climate change on public lands. For more information, see the webpage.

Co-sponsored by the Government Department, the McKeen Center for the Common Good, and Environmental Studies Program. For more information call 725-3396.

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Joel Greenberg: "Hope is the Thing with Feathers"

Joel Greenberg:

September 19, 2013 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Joel Greenberg, Research Associate at both 
Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum, Chicago Academy of Sciences, 
and Field Museum, Chicago, IL



Joel has been a birder/naturalist for 45 years, and has shared his love and knowledge of nature and conservation by authoring three books, writing numerous articles, co-hosting a radio show, blogging on Birdzilla.com, and lecturing widely. Since the summer of 2009, he has been working exclusively on passenger pigeons, for he has written the first book on the species in over 50 years. The book, Feathered River Across the Sky:  The Passenger Pigeon’s Flight to Extinction (Bloombury), is scheduled for publication in January 2014.

Joel’s total immersion in the literature over that time has led to his heavy involvement in Project Passenger Pigeon (http://passengerpigeon.org/). 


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Disentangling environmental drivers of rocky intertidal seaweed ecology

Disentangling environmental drivers of rocky intertidal seaweed ecology

September 26, 2013 4:00 PM  – 4:55 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

Sarah L. Close, '06, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Zoology, Oregon State University

My research focuses on how marine nearshore communities are shaped by the physical environment. In the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem coastal upwelling, bathymetry, and local factors interact to influence rocky intertidal communities in diverse ways and across different spatial scales. My research investigates the role of nutrients and light in marine macrophyte assemblage structure and function in order to further our understanding of how algal ecophysiology and nutritional ecology scale up to influence community dynamics. I approach this from a range of spatial scales, from small variations in tidal height on the order of meters, to large-scale variations in upwelling spanning hundreds of kilometers. Global climate change threatens to fundamentally alter physical patterns, such as temperature and pH, as well as processes, such as upwelling and sea level rise, in coastal oceans. Improving our understanding of the role these factors play in community dynamics is becoming increasingly important.

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Plutopia: Nuclear Families in Atomic Cities and the Great Soviet and American Plutonium Disasters

Plutopia: Nuclear Families in Atomic Cities and the Great Soviet and American Plutonium Disasters

September 26, 2013 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Searles Science Building, Room 315

Kate Brown is a leading historian of the Soviet Union and post-Soviet Russia, specializing in environmental history, the history of science and technology, and spatial history. In her latest book, Plutopia: Nuclear Families in Atomic Cities and the Great Soviet and American Plutonium Disasters, she provides the first definitive account of the great plutonium disasters of the United States and the Soviet Union.

Kate Brown lives in Washington, DC and is an Associate Professor of History at UMBC. She is the author of A Biography of No Place: From Ethnic Borderland to Soviet Heartland (Harvard 2004) which won among a handful of prizes including the American Historical Association's George Louis Beer Prize for the Best Book in International European History. Brown has published articles in the American Historical Review, Slate, Aeon, Chronicle of Higher Education, Harper's on-line edition, Kritika, and the TLS. She is a 2009 Guggenheim Fellow, and has been awarded grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Social Science Research Council, the National Council for East European and Eurasian Research, the International Research and Exchange Board, the Eurasia Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, Harvard University's Davis Center, and the Kennan Institute in Washington, DC. Currently Brown is working on a collection of essays called Being There, about the hapless adventures of an historian trying to recover the lost histories of modernist wastelands.

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Film: Village of No River

Film: Village of No River

September 26, 2013 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

This film takes viewers on a year-long visit to the Yup'ik village of Kwigillingok, Alaska. Residents of the village narrate the film and give the viewer insight into their world and activities in each of the four seasons. The film's writer, anthropologist Barbara Lipton, will give a short talk/slide presentation about the making of the film. 

Hosted by the Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum and Arctic Studies Center.

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Plutopia: A discussion with Kate Brown

Plutopia: A discussion with Kate Brown

September 27, 2013 2:00 PM  – 3:30 PM
Adams Hall, Room 111 (Common Room)

Join us for this informal discussion with environmental historian and award winning author Kate Brown.

Kate Brown lives in Washington, DC and is an Associate Professor of History at University of Maryland, Baltimore County. She is the author of A Biography of No Place: From Ethnic Borderland to Soviet Heartland (Harvard 2004) which won among a handful of prizes including the American Historical Association's George Louis Beer Prize for the Best Book in International European History. Brown has published articles in the American Historical Review, Slate, Aeon, Chronicle of Higher Education, Harper's on-line edition, Kritika, and the TLS. She is a 2009 Guggenheim Fellow, and has been awarded grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Social Science Research Council, the National Council for East European and Eurasian Research, the International Research and Exchange Board, the Eurasia Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, Harvard University's Davis Center, and the Kennan Institute in Washington, DC. Currently Brown is working on a collection of essays called Being There, about the hapless adventures of an historian trying to recover the lost histories of modernist wastelands.

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Princeton in Africa Info Session

Princeton in Africa Info Session

October 2, 2013 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Banister Hall, Room 106

Princeton in Africa Information Session
Wednesday, October 2, 7:00-8:00 pm
Banister Hall 106, McKeen Center

Princeton in Africa develops young leaders committed to Africa's advancement by offering yearlong fellowship opportunities with a variety of organizations that work across the African continent. PIAF expects to offer approximately 45 fellowships in about 15 countries for 2014-15.

Frank Strasburger, one of the founders of the Princeton in Africa program, will describe the application process and the various fellowship placements.

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Adolescents in the Americas: Negotiating Identities in an Interconnected World

Adolescents in the Americas: Negotiating Identities in an Interconnected World

October 3, 2013 4:00 PM  – 6:00 PM
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

This two-day symposium (Oct. 3-4) examines the myriad ways in which the activities and voices of youth impact contemporary politics, public culture, and social and interpersonal relationships. 

Participants include leading scholars in Anthropology, Education, Sociology, Latin American and Latino Studies, Africana Studies, and Gender and Sexuality Studies who conduct research in the United States, Canada and Latin America. For more information and the complete list of participants and schedule of events, click here.

ALL PANELS ARE FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. Sponsored by the Office of the Dean for Academic Affairs, the Departments of Education and Sociology and Anthropology, and by the Latin American Studies Program.

Thursday, October 3

4:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. "Claiming Belonging: Dilemmas of Identity among Adolescents in the Americas"

Friday, October 4

9:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. "Youth Refiguring Gender and Sexuality: Institutional Contexts, Interpersonal Dynamics"

1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. "Political Engagement and Social Activism among Youth: Opportunities and Possibilities, Present and Future"

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Designing for a Greener Tomorrow

Designing for a Greener Tomorrow

October 3, 2013 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Green Career Series: Designing for a Greener Tomorrow

Careers in green building are many and varied. Join us and hear from four professionals about their careers in green building.

Jason Peacock, LEED, AP, Building Scientist, Materials Expert- Maine Green Building Supply
Anne Stephenson, Architectural Historian, Energy Auditor, Campus Sustainability Consultant- Efficiency Maine
Colin Schless, LEED AP BD+C, Certified Passive House Consultant, Project Director, Architecture- Thornton Tomasetti
Morgan Law, LEED AP, Architecture, Energy Modeling, Certified Passive House Consultant- Kaplan Thompson Architects

You'll hear their career stories- how they came to be doing what they're doing, their lessons learned along the way, and about their experiences in green building.

The Green Career Series is a fun, casual way to learn about green careers and pick the brains of folks who are working in green careers. Each presenter will speak for about 10 minutes, leaving plenty of time for Q&A and conversation. To learn more about the panelists, see the Green Career Series: Designing For A Greener Tomorrow.

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People of a Feather

People of a Feather

October 15, 2013 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

People of a Feather

Tuesday, October 15, 2013, 7 PM
Beam Classroom, Visual Arts Center

This award winning film documents the world of the Inuit and Eider ducks on the Belcher Islands.  The contrasts between traditional and modern life are explored, as Inuit and Eiders face the challenges of changing sea ice and ocean currents, disrupted by the giant hydro dams powering North America.

Film producer and leading Canadian ecologist Joel Health will talk about the making of the film and his research on the effects of climate change on Arctic Sea ecology.

Free and open to the public. 

Sponsored by Lectures and Concerts, The Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum and Arctic Studies Center, and the Biology Department.

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Colin Woodard on Watchdog Journalism

Colin Woodard on Watchdog Journalism

October 16, 2013 7:30 PM  – 9:00 PM
Thorne Hall, Daggett Lounge

Watchdog Journalism: The Vital Role of a Threatened Discipline

Colin Woodard, an award-winning author and journalist, is State & National Affairs Writer at the Portland Press Herald and Maine Sunday Telegram, where he recently won a 2012 George Polk Award for his investigative reporting. He is a longtime foreign correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor, The Chronicle of Higher Education and The San Francisco Chronicle. A native of Maine, he has reported from more than fifty foreign countries and six continents, and lived for more than four years in Eastern Europe. He is the author of American Nations: A History of The Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America (Viking Press, 2011), The Republic of Pirates: Being The True and Surprising Story of the Caribbean Pirates and the Man Who Brought Them Down (Harcourt, 2007), the New England bestseller The Lobster Coast: Rebels, Rusticators, and the Struggle for a Forgotten Frontier (Viking Press, 2004), a cultural and environmental history of coastal Maine, and Ocean's End: Travels Through Endangered Seas (Basic Books, 2000), a narrative non-fiction account of the deterioration of the world's oceans. He lives in Midcoast Maine. www.colinwoodard.com

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Daniel Schrag on Climate, Energy, and Innovation

Daniel Schrag on Climate, Energy, and Innovation

October 18, 2013 12:30 PM  – 1:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Common Hour with Dr. Daniel Schrag - Keynote for President's Science Symposium

Daniel P. Schrag will discuss "Climate, Energy and Innovation."

The increase in atmospheric CO2 due to burning coal, oil and natural gas represents an unprecedented experiment on the Planet Earth. Geologic records support the view that future climate change will have a profound impact both on human society and on natural ecosystems. A daunting challenge is the timescale of climate change. More than half of the carbon dioxide emitted to the atmosphere by burning fossil fuels will remain for hundreds of years, and roughly 20% will be there for tens of thousands of years. In this context, a variety of strategies will be discussed for meeting the world's energy needs, preserving economic prosperity and security, while protecting human and natural systems from climate impacts. In addition, we will explore what strategies might be required if the impacts of climate change are larger than we expect.

Daniel Schrag is the Director of the Harvard University Center for the Environment, the Sturgis Hooper Professor of Geology, and Professor of Environmental Science and Engineering at Harvard University. He currently serves on President Obama's Council of Advisors for Science and Technology. Among various honors, he was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2000. Schrag received a B.S. from Yale University and a Ph.D. in Geology from the University of California at Berkeley.

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Local Political Geography and Institutionalized Racial Inequality

Local Political Geography and Institutionalized Racial Inequality

October 23, 2013 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Searles Science Building, Room 315

Dr. Allan Parnell will discuss the work he and his non-profit (Cedar Grove Institute) has done in challenging social inequities using GIS and census data. 

Dr. Parnell is a demographer who runs a non-profit demographer who runs a non-profit firm in North Carolina (Cedar Grove Institute); website: http://www.cedargroveinst.org/.  He and his group do research and analyses to provide support for legal cases involving civil rights, predatory lending, segregation in schools, institutionalized discrimination and community economic development.
 
Sponsored by the Department of Sociology/Anthropology, the Environmental Studies Program, the McKeen Center, and Lectures and Concerts.

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Shored Up

Shored Up

October 24, 2013 7:30 PM  – 9:30 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

Our beaches and coastline are a national treasure, a shared resource, a beacon of sanity in a world of constant change…and they’re disappearing in front of us. Shored Up is a documentary that asks tough questions about coastal communities in the US and their relationships with the land. What will a rising sea do to our homes, our businesses, and the survival of our communities? Can we afford to pile enough sand on our shores to keep the ocean at bay? In Long Beach Island, New Jersey and the Outer Banks of North Carolina, surfers, politicians, scientists, and residents are racing to answer these questions. Beach engineering has been our only approach so far, but is there something else out there to be explored? Highly developed US coastlines puts us in a tough predicament, and it’s time to start looking for solutions.

Following the movie, there will be a question-and-answer session with the producer of the film.

Visit shoredupmovie.com to view the trailer or for more information. This event is possible due to support from the Environmental Studies, Film Studies, Government and Legal Studies, and the Anthropology and Sociology departments, as well as the Sustainability Office, the McKeen Center for the Common Good, and the Bowdoin Green Alliance.

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Voluntary Environmentalists?

Voluntary Environmentalists?

November 6, 2013 7:30 PM  – 9:00 PM
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

Voluntary Environmentalists: Are green clubs a win for businesses and the environment?
Many companies around the world are participating in voluntary programs that require them to do good things for the environment, even beyond the requirements of government regulations. Some environmentalists worry that these programs are yet more corporate propaganda attempting to greenwash companies' poor environmental records. Supporters see in these programs great potential to improve environmental conditions in an era when gridlock prevents government led solutions. In this talk I will propose an analytic lens that focuses on what problems these programs can solve and what types of rules they need to be effective. Voluntary programs can induce companies to reduce their pollution emissions if they offer a mechanism that credibly signals their superior environmental behavior.

Matthew Potoski is a Professor at the Bren School of Environmental Science and Management at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He teaches courses on corporate environmental management, and his research focuses on management, voluntary environmental programs, and public policy. He co-authored The Voluntary Environmentalists (Cambridge, 2006) and was co-editor of Voluntary Programs (MIT, 2009). He is currently co-editor of the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management and the International Public Management Journal.

Sponsored by the Environmental Studies Program and the McKeen Center for the Common Good, the Bowdoin Globalist, and the Government & Legal Studies Department with support from the John C. Donovan Lecture Fund.

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Changing Tides: Perspectives on Sea Level Rise

Changing Tides: Perspectives on Sea Level Rise

November 14, 2013 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Searles Science Building, Room 315

An interdisciplinary panel to consider both the local and global impacts of sea level rise. Government Professor Allen Springer, marine geologist Peter Slovinsky of the Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry in the Maine Geological Survey, and EOS major Cam Adams, '14, will present, highlighting the ways that different governments deal with the issues presented by sea level rise, and what steps are being taken in the Northeast and in Midcoast Maine to combat this problem.

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Is 'Conservative Environmentalist' an Oxymoron?

Is 'Conservative Environmentalist' an Oxymoron?

February 7, 2014 4:00 PM  – 6:00 PM
Hubbard Hall, Room 208 Thomas F. Shannon Room

Steven F. Hayward is currently the inaugural visiting scholar in conservative thought and policy at the University of Colorado at Boulder.


From 2002 to 2012 Professor Hayward was the F.K Weyerhaeuser Fellow in Law and Economics at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington DC, and senior fellow at the Pacific Research Institute in San Francisco. He has also been the Thomas Smith Distinguished Visiting Fellow at the Ashbrook Center at Ashland University in Ohio, and the William Simon Distinguished Visiting Professor at Pepperdine University's Graduate School of Public Policy in California.

He holds a Ph.D in American Studies and an M.A. in Government from Claremont Graduate School. He writes frequently on a wide range of current topics, including environmentalism, law, economics, and public policy for publications including National Review, Reason, The Weekly Standard, The American Spectator, The Public Interest, the Claremont Review of Books, and Policy Review. He is the author of a two-volume narrative history of Ronald Reagan and his effect on American political life, The Age of Reagan: The Fall of the Old Liberal Order, 1964-1980, and The Age of Reagan: The Conservative Counter-Revolution, 1980-1989 (CrownForum books).

The evening is sponsored by the John C. Donovan Lecture Fund, which was established at Bowdoin College in 1990 by family members, professional colleagues and friends of John C. Donovan. Donovan served as Bowdoin's DeAlva Stanwood Alexander Professor of Government from 1965 until his death in 1984. Established through the leadership of Shepard Lee, Bowdoin Class of 1947, this fund is used to support lectures in the field of political science.

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