2012 Calendar of Events

Environmental Studies Program Senior Reception

Environmental Studies Program Senior Reception

May 25, 201212:00 PM – 2:00 PM
Adams Hall, Room 111 (Common Room)

Friday, May 25 2012
12:00-pm-2:00pm
ES Common Room, Adams Hall

A reception for all graduating environmental studies majors/minors, families and friends. Come join us to celebrate the Environmental Studies Seniors!

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Gulf of Maine in a Changing Climate

Gulf of Maine in a Changing Climate

June 13, 20128:30 AM – 4:30 PM
Searles Science Building, Room 315

The Gulf of Maine in a Changing Climate
June 12-13

June 13
8:15-8:30 Continental Breakfast
8:15-4:30 Lectures: Searles Hall, Room 315

This two- day workshop will be focused on the observed trends and variability in the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of the Gulf of Maine. Scientists have been making continuous observations of in the Gulf of Maine region for decades, ranging from hydrology to circulation, nutrients to fisheries, and have identified notable and portent trends and shifts.
This workshop provides a forum for discussions of scientific observations with an eye to predicting future characteristics of the Gulf.


Registration is free to Bowdoin faculty, staff and students, as well as other undergraduate students. Registration is and $25 for graduate students and $50 for other participants outside the Bowdoin community. For more information and to register, see the webpage

Please contact either Dr. Collin Roesler, or Rosie Armstrong (rarmstro@bowdoin.edu) with any questions.

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Protecting Canyonlands in Southern Utah (Jackie Feinberg)

Protecting Canyonlands in Southern Utah (Jackie Feinberg)

September 19, 20127:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Schwartz Outdoor Leadership, Beebe Room

Jackie Feinberg is the National Grassroots Organizer for the Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance. For the past five years, she has spoken to various groups on the east coast and other parts of the country about the ongoing campaign to protect the remaining wild public lands in Utah.

"There are few enough places left in the lower 48 where we can truly lose ourselves, stand alone and bask in creation's splendor. One of them is the Greater Canyonlands Region, a stretch of matchless country in Southern Utah at the heart of which is Canyonlands National Park.

Sponsored by the Bowdoin Outing Club & the Environmental Studies Program

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Navigating Alaskan Waters: Natives, Science, and Politics

Navigating Alaskan Waters: Natives, Science, and Politics

September 20, 20124:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

An extraordinary group of 11 Alaskan Iñupiat and Yup'ik hunters and leaders will gather on the Bowdoin College campus September 18 through 20, 2012, for a series of meetings to look at issues of marine mammal protection and indigenous subsistence activities in light of climate change, as well as growing gas and petroleum development and ship traffic in the region.

On Thursday, September 20, the leaders will participate in a panel discussion, "Navigating Alaskan Waters: Natives, Science, and Politics" from 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. in Kresge Auditorium, Visual Arts Center. The panel discussion is free and open to the public.

George Noongwook, a representative of the Alaska Eskimo Whaling Commission, will be the keynote speaker. Representatives of the five Alaskan marine mammal commissions will join him in discussions moderated by Martin Robards of the Arctic Beringia Program.

The panelists are the heads of Alaska's five marine mammal commissions (whale, beluga, polar bear, seal, and walrus). They will talk about the challenges and opportunities their families and communities face in light of intensification of oil and gas development in Alaska, dramatic increases in ship traffic as ice disappears from northern waters, and climate change. They will also reflect on the importance and difficulty of integrating traditional knowledge, science, and policy when trying to safeguard marine mammal habitat and traditional cultural lifeways.

The commissioners work with state and federal authorities to ensure marine mammal populations stay healthy and indigenous hunters can continue their traditional harvesting of animals.

Along with representatives of local Alaskan community governments, they are conducting two days of meetings at Bowdoin College to work on common community concerns, most immediately the dramatic increase in international ship traffic through Alaskan waters. They will be finalizing a statement to be presented to the U.S. Coast Guard, the Alaska Congressional Delegation, and the federal Marine Mammal Commission detailing key concerns about shipping and measures that should be taken to ensure the safety of marine mammals, indigenous subsistence activities, and food security.

 While at Bowdoin the Alaskans will visit a number of anthropology, sociology, and environmental studies classes where they will talk with Bowdoin students about how the Iñupiat and Yup'ik organizations work with local, state, federal, and international organizations. 

This gathering of Alaskan leaders on the Bowdoin College campus is funded by the Oak Foundation and the Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum and Arctic Studies Center, whose current exhibition, "Animal Allies, Inuit Views of the natural World," highlights traditional knowledge of Alaskan and Canadian northern hunters.

For more information about the panel discussion call 207-725-3062 or 207-725-3416.

Photo by Anne Henshaw.

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Mexican Immigrant Fathers: The Effects of Gendered Immigration Policy Enforcement with Sarah Lipinoga Gallo '03

Mexican Immigrant Fathers: The Effects of Gendered Immigration Policy Enforcement with Sarah Lipinoga Gallo '03

September 25, 20127:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Hubbard Hall, Room 208 Thomas F. Shannon Room

Sarah Lipinoga Gallo is a Ph.D. Candidate in Educational Linguistics at the University of Pennsylvania. Situated in a recently established Mexican immigrant community, her ethnographic research focuses on a new generation of Mexican immigrant fathers' complicated politics of recognition across public, private, and institutional contexts. This talk will examine the implementation of current immigration policies, which have come to equate "illegal" with "Mexican immigrant." She will discuss how the enforcement of these policies, which overwhelmingly target Mexican immigrant men, affect immigrant children and their schooling in powerful ways. She will also highlight how targeting Mexican adult males, especially for minor infractions, is likely to create educational challenges for their children, a younger generation of DREAMers and U.S. citizens.

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A BioMath view of critical thresholds and tipping

A BioMath view of critical thresholds and tipping

September 27, 20124:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT WEEKLY SEMINAR SERIES

Mary Lou Zeeman, R. Wells Johnson Professor of Mathematics, "A BioMath view of critical thresholds and tipping"

Research Interests:
Geometric dynamical systems, mathematical biology, population dynamics, neuroendocrinology and hormone oscillations, hypothalamus-pituitary interactions, climate modeling and sustainability

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"The Future is in the Dirt" by Ben Hewitt

September 27, 20127:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Keynote: "The Future's In the Dirt," Ben Hewitt

Ben Hewitt is a farmer in Cabot, Vermont, and the author of two books, The Town That Food Saved: How One Community Found Vitality in Local Food and Making Supper Safe: One Man's Quest to Learn the Truth About Food Safety and an upcoming book, Saved: How to Break the Spell of Money, Live Well, and Change the World. His writing has also appeared in numerous national publications including New York Times Magazine, National Geographic Adventure, and Outside. His work focuses on how a regionalized food-based system can be used to create economic development, how weaning Americans off their dependence on industrial food improves public health, and how communities all over New England can become sustainable food hubs similar to what has been created in his hometown.

Cosponsored with Local Farms-Local Food, a program of the Kennebec Estuary Land Trust and the Brunswick-Topsham Land Trust. 

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Adapting to Climate: An interactive Panel Discussion on Climate Adaptation & Preparedness

Adapting to Climate: An interactive Panel Discussion on Climate Adaptation & Preparedness

October 3, 20127:00 PM – 8:30 PM
Searles Science Building, Room 315

Adapting to Change: An interactive Panel Discussion on Climate Adaptation & Preparedness
Wed. Oct 3 7:00-8:30 pm
Searles Hall, Room 315
Bowdoin College

A Pre-conference panel discussion of the Northern New England Chapter of the American Planning Association. The panel discussion will provide an opportunity for attendees to converse with outstanding speakers on a number of climate adaption issues dealing with infrastructure, wildlife habitat, and adapting to our ever-changing coastal area in New England.
This event is free and open to the public free of charge.

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"The Transnational Politics of Energy and Climate" by Robert Keohane

October 3, 20127:30 PM – 8:45 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Lecture Title: "The Transnational Politics of Energy and Climate"

Robert Keohane is professor at the Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University. He is undoubtedly one of the most influential scholars of international affairs.

With a Ph.D. from Harvard, Professor Keohane is best known for his path-breaking book, After Hegemony: Cooperation and Discord in the World Political Economy, along with Power and Interdependence, co-authored with Joseph Nye Jr. and now in its third edition. He has written or edited more than 20 books and numerous articles, and virtually every undergraduate student of international relations will have read at least one of them. He has served as president of the International Studies Association and the American Political Science Association, and has taught at Swarthmore, Brandeis, Harvard and Duke University.

Professor Keohane's talk is sponsored by the Department of Government through the Donovan Lecture Fund. It is free and open to the public. For more information, call 207-725-3295.

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Common Hour with Dr. Thomas Seeley, President's Science Symposium

Common Hour with Dr. Thomas Seeley, President's Science Symposium

October 12, 201212:30 PM – 1:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Honeybee Democracy

Thomas D. Seeley is a professor in the Department of Neurobiology and Behavior at Cornell University, where he teaches courses on animal behavior and does research on the functional organization of honeybee colonies. He grew up in Ithaca, New York, and began keeping and studying bees while in high school. He left home to study at Dartmouth College in 1970, but returned to Ithaca each summer to work at the Dyce Laboratory for Honeybee Studies at Cornell, where he learned the craft of beekeeping and began probing the inner workings of the honeybee colony. Thoroughly intrigued by the smooth functioning of bee colonies, he went on to graduate school at Harvard University. His research focuses on the behavior, ecology, and social life of honeybees. In recognition of his scientific work, he has received the Senior Scientist Prize of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, been awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship, and been elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

To view the Fall 2012 Common Hour program in its entirety, please visit us at: Events and Summer Programs: Common Hour

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President's Science Symposium: Student Poster Presentations and Reception

President's Science Symposium: Student Poster Presentations and Reception

October 12, 20123:00 PM – 4:30 PM
David Saul Smith Union, Morrell Lounge

The President's Science Symposium wraps up with poster presentations by the summer research fellows. Over 100 students will be presenting their research findings! Enjoy tea, coffee and cookies and learn about topics ranging from the molting cycle of the American lobster to the atmospheric history of methane gas.

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Artist's talk: Isabelle Smeets

Artist's talk: Isabelle Smeets

October 17, 20124:15 PM – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Isabelle Smeets, Dutch Artist and member of BIOMODD (NYC4).

She will talk about her involvement with BIOMODD, a multifaceted socially engaged art installation that finds meaningful relationships between biology, computers and people. On the most basic level, Biomodd creates symbiotic relationships between plants and computers, and ignites conversations among the community around them. Another project she will discuss is a conceptual architectural project called "A Watchtower of Nothingness."

The event is co-sponsored by the Art, Biology and Computer Science Departments and the Environmental Studies Program.

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Film:

Film: "Goranson Farm: An Uncertain Harvest" Oct. 17

October 17, 20127:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

In the 1980s, first-generation college graduate Jan Goranson returned to Maine to run the family farm upon her father's death. Over the course of 25 years, she and her family built the farm into an active organic farm serving the Midcoast.

The film follows Goranson and her husband Rob Johanson, their two sons, and their crew through the 2009 growing season, as they struggle first against the rainiest June on record, then with a potato blight that threatens to destroy their entire crop.

Goranson Farm: An Uncertain Harvest was an official selection at the Camden International Film Festival.

Co-sponsored by Film Studies and the Environmental Studies Program. Open to the public free of charge.

For more information, see the webpage

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Changes in the Benthic Communities in the Gulf of Maine: Here Comes the Invasives!

Changes in the Benthic Communities in the Gulf of Maine: Here Comes the Invasives!

October 18, 20124:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020


Larry Harris, Center for Marine Biology, Department of Zoology, University of New Hampshire

Research Emphasis
I was trained as an invertebrate zoologist with strong interests in life histories, behavior, and offensive and defensive strategies between members of associations. My research is most accurately described as quantitative and manipulative natural history. I am particularly interested in organisms and how they are adapted to their systems. This would be in contrast to a more theoretical approach that places primary emphasis on testing general models. Both are important-I just happen to like living animals first.
My primary focus is on the ecology of species-specific, predator-prey associations and the role of predation in early community succession. There are two groups of organisms that are my favorites for research, cnidarians and nudibranchs. Both of these are predators so I can look at predation at more than one level in the same association.
I am also continuing some long-term subtidal community studies using both fouling panels and benthic communities. The manipulations involve substrate angle, predator access and depth. Three separate studies have been underway since the late 1970s and are becoming increasingly valuable for observing long-term trends and investigating the roles of new invaders into the Gulf of Maine system.
In the last few years I have become increasingly interested in understanding how sustained species exploitation by man influences community structure. I am presently trying to use this knowledge to develop an integrated approach for enhancing recruitment and growth of sea urchins that might result in a sustainable fishery with healthy benthic communities.

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Environmental Studies Pre-majors Dinner Meeting (Pizza and Salad)

Environmental Studies Pre-majors Dinner Meeting (Pizza and Salad)

October 18, 20126:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Adams Hall, Room 111 (Common Room)

Interested in majoring in Environmental Studies?
Attend one of the two pre-majors meetings hosted by the ES Program in October

Pizza and Salad will be Provided

Dinner: Thursday October 18 6:00-7:00 pm
ES Common Room, Adams Hall

Lunch: Friday, October 26 12:30-1:30 pm
ES Common Room, Adams Hall

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Film:

Film: "Qapirangajuq: Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change" Oct. 18

October 18, 20127:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

7-8 PM
Free

A stunning documentary by Zacharias Kunuk (Atanarjuat: The Fast Runner) and filmmaker Dr. Ian Mauro (Seeds of Change), Qapirangajug explores the social and ecological impacts of a warming Arctic from the perspectives of hunters and elders. This film, the world's first Inuktitut language film with English subtitles on the topic of climate change, features beautiful footage of the north and powerful interviews with Inuit.

Sponsored by the Edgard and Geraldine Feder Foundation, Inc., courtesy of Igloolik Isuma Productions.

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LaCasce Speaker Seminar

LaCasce Speaker Seminar

October 19, 20122:30 PM – 3:30 PM
Searles Science Building, Room 313

"Ice core insights into past atmospheric oxidant chemistry"
by Eric Sofen, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington

As the earth went into and out of ice ages, and more recently, industrial activity kicked in, the chemistry of the atmosphere evolved. I'll show how ice core based records of nitrate and sulfate can tell us about this evolution.

Reception to follow in Searles 314.

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Lecture:

Lecture: "Radioactive Heritage: The Legacy of Chernobyl" Oct. 22

October 22, 20127:00 PM – 8:30 PM
Hubbard Hall, Room 208 Thomas F. Shannon Room

Nicholas Hryhorczuk from the Department of Recreation, Sport and Tourism at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, will give the talk "Radioactive Heritage: The Legacy of Chernobyl."

The Chernobyl reactor accident of 1986 contaminated large areas of Ukraine, Belarus, and Russia with radiation and produced a 30 km exclusion zone around the reactor. The accident displaced large numbers of people from their ancestral homes and devastated the local economy.

The exclusion zone has been intermittently open to limited tourism. The designation of Chernobyl as a UNESCO heritage site, similar to the UNESCO designation of the Hiroshima atomic bomb site, has the potential to not only preserve the legacy of this manmade disaster but also to revive the local economy through the responsible promotion of ecotourism.

However, the plans also raise issues related to "disaster tourism" or "blighted tourism" and initiate contentious debates about the official interpretation of Chernobyl--who is to blame, who was affected and how, and what the site means now. These are important questions as we think about the Fukushima disaster in Japan and the future of nuclear power more broadly.

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Launch Your Green Dream Job: Energy and Sustainability Alumni Panel

Launch Your Green Dream Job: Energy and Sustainability Alumni Panel

October 22, 20127:30 PM – 8:30 PM
Quinby House, Living Room

Launch Your Green Dream Job: Energy and Sustainability Alumni Panel

Date: Monday, October 22
Time: 7:30 pm - 8:30pm
Location: Quinby House

Are you interested in an environmental career, but uncertain how to go about landing an internship or a job?

Join us for this alumni panel to learn about the various career paths that five different graduates from the Class of 2010 pursued on their way to landing a green dream job!

You'll meet:

Brooks Winner, Community Energy Associate at the Island Institute
Thai Ha-Ngoc, Program Assistant at The Henry P. Kendall Foundation
Drew Trafton, Associate Analyst/Engineer at GDS Associates, Inc.
Abriel Ferreira, Pricing and Product Manager at Competitive Energy Services
Simon Ou, Princeton in Asia Fellow at the Institute for Sustainable Communities

Co-sponsored by Bowdoin Career Planning, Environmental Studies, Residential Life, Green Global Initiatives, and the Green Bowdoin Alliance.

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Environmental Studies Pre-majors Lunch Meeting (Pizza and Salad)

Environmental Studies Pre-majors Lunch Meeting (Pizza and Salad)

October 26, 201212:30 PM – 1:30 PM
Adams Hall, Room 111 (Common Room)

Interested in majoring in Environmental Studies?
Attend one of the two pre-majors meetings hosted by the ES Program in October

Pizza and Salad will be Provided

Dinner: Thursday October 18 6:00-7:00 pm
ES Common Room, Adams Hall

Lunch: Friday, October 26 12:30-1:30 pm
ES Common Room, Adams Hall

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Robert Greenlee and Nathaniel Wheelwright present: Doves - They've got Rhythm!

Robert Greenlee and Nathaniel Wheelwright present: Doves - They've got Rhythm!

November 14, 201212:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

FACULTY SEMINAR SERIES

Robert Greenlee, Professor of Music and Nathaniel Wheelwright, Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of Natural Sciences are the featured speakers. Their talk is titled Doves - They've got Rhythm!

Open to faculty & staff.
Buffet lunch $3, or bring your own lunch.

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Susan Merriam, Associate Professor of Art History from Bard College: Being Animal, Becoming Human. Exploring the Human-Animal Boundary in the Visual Culture of Early Modern Europe

Susan Merriam, Associate Professor of Art History from Bard College: Being Animal, Becoming Human. Exploring the Human-Animal Boundary in the Visual Culture of Early Modern Europe

November 14, 20126:30 PM – 8:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Susan Merriam, Associate Professor of Art History from Bard College will speak on "Being Animal, Becoming Human. Exploring the Human-Animal Boundary in the Visual Culture of Early Modern Europe" She will consider early modern attitudes toward and images of animals

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Michael Kolster presents: River of Shadows: Recent Conversations with Silver Salts and Ultraviolet Radiation

Michael Kolster presents: River of Shadows: Recent Conversations with Silver Salts and Ultraviolet Radiation

November 27, 201212:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

FACULTY SEMINAR SERIES

Michael Kolster, Associate Professor of Art is the featured speaker. His talk is titled River of Shadows: Recent Conversations with Silver Salts and Ultraviolet Radiation.

Open to faculty & staff.
Buffet lunch $3, or bring your own lunch.

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The ecological and evolutionary impacts of agricultural management on songbirds

The ecological and evolutionary impacts of agricultural management on songbirds

December 6, 20124:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

Noah Perlut, Assistant Professor, University of New England,

Research Interests
I study the joint ecological and evolutionary consequences of using human-managed habitats as wildlife habitat. In 2002 I began a long-term research project on how hayfield and pasture management affects the life-histories of grassland songbirds. Along with ecology and evolution work, this project has expanded to create and explore federal policies that balance landowners' economic and birds' life-history needs. Additional projects include: studying grey squirrel ecology on the UNE campus; exploring the ecology of urban roof-nesting Herring Gulls; evaluating the marsh bird communities on the Saco River; exploring what the ideal farm looks like--both in terms of maximizing farm production as well as biodiversity.

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