Fall 2014 Calendar of Events

David Hecht presents: "The Power of the Metaphor: Evolution, Economics, and The Selfish Gene"

David Hecht presents: "The Power of the Metaphor: Evolution, Economics, and The Selfish Gene"

September 16, 2014 12:00 PM  – 1:00 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

FACULTY SEMINAR SERIES

David Hecht
, Assistant Professor of History is the featured speaker. The title of his talk is: "The Power of Metaphor: Evolution, Economics, and The Selfish Gene."

Open to faculty and staff.
Buffet lunch $3, or bring your own lunch.

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Author Pope Brock: "Another Fine Mess: Life on Tomorrow's Moon"

Author Pope Brock:  "Another Fine Mess: Life on Tomorrow's Moon"

September 18, 2014 4:30 PM  – 5:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Pope Brock will speak on his current book project, Another Fine Mess: Life on Tomorrow's Moon, which imagines what might happen on the moon in the mid-to-late 21st century if the schemes various governments, corporations, and obsessed individuals have for it all come true.

Brock is also the author of Charlatan: America's Most Dangerous Huckster, the Man Who Pursued Him, and the Age of Flimflam (Crown, 2008), an account of the improbable career of John Brinkley, the most successful quack in U.S. history, and Indiana Gothic (Doubleday/Nan Talese). His work has appeared in GQ, Rolling Stone, Esquire, Talk, The New Yorker, London Independent, Life, People, and the London Sunday Times Magazine.

Brock received his BA from Harvard University and his MFA from New York University School of the Arts.  He is currently on the faculty of the MFA Program in Writing at the University of Nebraska.

Brock's lecture will be followed by a reception in the Visual Arts Center "Fishbowl."

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Book reading and signing by Rabbi Simeon Maslin

Book reading and signing by Rabbi Simeon Maslin

September 28, 2014 4:00 PM  – 5:30 PM
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

Bowdoin Hillel will host local author, Rabbi Simeon J. Maslin, the author of the recently published novel, Uncle Sol’s Women, at a reception and reading on Sunday afternoon, September 28, in Moulton Union’s Lancaster Lounge. This debut novel, set largely in Maine, has been described by Kirkus Reviews as comparable to Thomas Mann’s Buddenbrooks and John Galsworthy’s The Forsyte Saga. Maslin is a resident of both Harpswell and Philadelphia and has served as rabbi for High Holy Day services at Bowdoin College for the past fourteen years. His novel opens and closes in Vilnius, Lithuania, but much of the action takes place around Brunswick, mid-coast Maine and Bowdoin College. We follow the protagonist, Justin Ross, from his birth in Boston, through his academic career at Harvard and the University of Chicago, to Harpswell where he comes under the influence of his wealthy, profligate Uncle Sol and falls in love with the beautiful but forbidden Marie Beaulieu from Presque Isle. From the Kirkus Review: Like Chaim Potok and Philip Roth before him, Maslin – himself a rabbi – focuses on the lives of 20th-century American Jews…. His book is fueled by human relationships, and there’s an intimacy and tenderness in his treatment of his characters…. Rabbi Maslin has served as the president of the Central Conference of American Rabbi and as president of both the Chicago and Philadelphia Boards of Rabbis. He has also served congregations in Curacao, South Africa and Australia. During the summer months, he leads a Torah study group each Saturday morning in Bowdoin’s Kanbar Hall. All are welcome to the reading and discussion in Lancaster Lounge.

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Bowdoin Friends Book Lecture Series (Film): Richard III (1995)

Bowdoin Friends Book Lecture Series (Film): Richard III (1995)

October 2, 2014 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Richard III (1995), directed by Richard Loncraine, presented by Aaron Kitch, associate professor and chair of the English department. The film is being presented in conjunction with his talk on October 9, "Looking for Richard: The Many Faces of Shakespeare's Stage Villain." For more information about this, refer to the second issue of the Bowdoin Bulletin or call 207-725-3253.

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Damnationland: Six Short Horror Films by Maine Filmmakers

Damnationland: Six Short Horror Films by Maine Filmmakers

October 2, 2014 7:00 PM  – 10:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

Damnationland, now in its fifth year, presents genre-defying original works from Maine filmmakers that redefine the classic thriller and horror categories.

Especially for the Halloween season, this Damnationland retrospective program will feature six short films produced in Maine by Mainers from 2010 through 2013.

These are dark, surreal, and fantastic pieces, and they offer film fans an excellent sampling of the talent producing independent film in Maine today.

Syrup (2013)
What begins as a quaint morning in New England becomes a nightmare over breakfast.
Through The Door Productions
Directed by Caroline O'Connor and Everett Bunker

Penelope: Once Upon A Time In The Woods (2013)
A dark fairy tale set in the Maine woods, where evil twists the imagination of a young girl as her older sister gets pulled to the horrors that lurk within.
Moving Circle Pictures
Directed by Jennifer Widor Smith

Last Call (2010)
The story of an ordinary man who has an epiphany and believes he must perform last rites on zombies because they still have souls. Zombie mayhem in Southern Maine.
Directed by Christian and Sarah Matzke.

Merrow (2012)
A study in the calm terror of the inevitable, "Merrow" tells an otherwordly love story between a man and his mistress of the sea. As their intense relationship winds towards its tragic end, the couple becomes more entwined in a macabre dance of strength, support, and codependence.
Written and directed by Allen Baldwin

Raid of the Vomit-Blood Fiends (2012)
All is well when a husband and wife discuss politics over a candlelit dinner. That is, until the butler misplaces the wine.
Written and directed by R.J. Wilson

Are You The Walkers? (2011) - . This film continues in the spirit of the traditional supernatural folktale. Two men seek to deter a creeping divergence in their friendship by retreating deep into the Maine woods for the weekend. Caught in a sudden and severe blizzard, their relationship unravels as they are visited by a voice that calls to them from the storm. Directed by Derek Kimball

To see more: www.damnationland.com


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Ryan Cordell Lecture "Viral Texts and the Technologies of Authorship"

Ryan Cordell Lecture "Viral Texts and the Technologies of Authorship"

October 6, 2014 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

Ryan Cordell will draw on the Viral Texts project at Northeastern University (http://www.viraltexts.org) to demonstrate how computational methods such as text mining, mapping, and network analysis can illuminate nineteenth-century systems of circulation, reprinting, and remediation systemically and at scale. Dr. Cordell’s project focuses on the viral culture that enlivened nineteenth-century periodical production, distribution, and consumption. Though the term “viral culture” is new, many of the practices it describes—especially the sharing, remixing, and repurposing of cultural materials—emerged long before the twenty-first century.

Ryan Cordell is Assistant Professor of English at Northeastern University and Core Founding Faculty Member in the NULab for Texts, Maps, and Networks. His scholarship focuses on convergences among literary, periodical, and religious culture in antebellum American mass media.

This lecture is underwritten by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

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Bowdoin Friends Book Lecture Series: "Looking for Richard: The Many Faces of Shakespeare's Stage Villain"

Bowdoin Friends Book Lecture Series: "Looking for Richard: The Many Faces of Shakespeare's Stage Villain"

October 9, 2014 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

The Association of Bowdoin Friends is pleased to continue this program. All members of the community are invited to read a good book and hear an excellent Bowdoin College professor lecture about it. There will be opportunity for questions. The event is free and open to the public. Just come, listen, and learn.

Associate Professor and Chair of the English Department Aaron Kitch will present:

"Looking for Richard: The Many Faces of Shakespeare's Stage Villain"
Shakespeare's play, Tragedy of Richard III

How did Richard III, whose notorious defeat by the Earl of Richmond at the Battle of Bosworth in 1485 initiated the Tudor dynasty, become a dramatic symbol of evil in Shakespeare's day and our own? Why, moreover, have so many readers and viewers found Shakespeare's stage villain strangely likeable over the centuries? To address these fundamental questions, Professor Kitch will situate Shakespeare's Tragedy of Richard III in the context of Elizabethan ideologies of power and in relation to contemporary politics of representation as found in cinematic productions starring Laurence Olivier, Ian McKellen, and Al Pacino. Reading Richard as an enduring icon of evil also allows us to find some of Shakespeare's central methods for creating plot and character through complex irony.

Aaron Kitch teaches courses on early modern drama and culture, including "Shakespeare's Afterlives" and "Shakespeare in Theory." He is the author of Political Economy and the States of Literature in Early Modern England, as well as multiple essays on Renaissance literature and culture.




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Jeri DeBrohun, "Love's Allusions: Elegy and Intertextuality"

Jeri DeBrohun, "Love's Allusions: Elegy and Intertextuality"

October 16, 2014 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

Jeri DeBrohun is associate professor of classics at Brown University. An expert on gender in Latin poetry, her lecture on Roman elegiac love poetry will be of interest to students in Classics and other disciplines such as English and Romance Languages.

Sponsored by the Jasper Jacob Stahl Lectureship Fund and the Classics Department.

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Seth Schein: "'War, What is it Good For?' in Homer's Iliad and Four Receptions"

Seth Schein: "'War, What is it Good For?' in Homer's Iliad and Four Receptions"

October 20, 2014 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Seth Schein is Emeritus Professor of Comparative Literature at the University of California, Davis.  A leading scholar of Homer, his lecture will explore not only the topic of war in the Iliad but also the influence of Homer's poetry on twentieth-century poetry and music.  He will touch on artistic responses to war in both antiquity and the present day.  

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Book Release Celebration - David Collings "Stolen Future, Broken Present: The Human Significance of Climate Change"

Book Release Celebration - David Collings "Stolen Future, Broken Present: The Human Significance of Climate Change"

October 22, 2014 4:15 PM  – 5:15 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

Join us for a discussion and reception celebrating the release of Bowdoin Professor of English David Collings' new book, Stolen Future, Broken Present: The Human Significance of Climate Change, moderated by Collin Roesler, Associate Professor of Earth and Oceanographic Science at Bowdoin.

In Stolen Future, Collings argues that we are virtually out of time to prevent severe, irreversible climate change - with a devastating effect on how we think about the future.

Nearly everything we do, Collings says, is premised on the assumption that the world we know will endure into the future and provide a sustaining context for our activities. But today the future of a viable biosphere, and thus the purpose of our present activities, is put into question. A disappearing future leads to a broken present, a strange incoherence in the feel of everyday life.

We thus face the unprecedented challenge of salvaging a basis for our lives today. That basis may be found in our capacity to assume an infinite responsibility for ecological disaster. By owning disaster and accepting our small place within the inhuman forces of the biosphere, we may discover how to live with responsibility and serenity whatever may come.

David Collings teaches courses in British Romanticism, critical theory, sexuality and gender, and environmental studies. He is the author of Wordsworthian Errancies: The Poetics of Cultural Dismemberment (1994) and Monstrous Society: Reciprocity, Discipline, and the Political Uncanny, c. 1780-1848 (2009), among others.

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The Alfred E Golz Memorial Lecture: "Democracy at the Roots: Understanding Haiti's Political Culture" - Streamed LIVE

The Alfred E Golz Memorial Lecture: "Democracy at the Roots: Understanding Haiti's Political Culture" - Streamed LIVE

October 23, 2014 7:30 PM  – 9:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Laurent Dubois is the Marcello Lotti Professor of Romance Studies and History at Duke University. He is the author of several books on the history and culture of the French Caribbean and Atlantic World, including Avengers of the New World: The Story of the Haitian Revolution (2004), A Colony of Citizens: Revolution and Slave Emancipation in the French Caribbean, 1787-1804 (2004), and his latest work, Haiti: The Aftershocks of History (2012). He also has an interest in the relationship between sports and politics. In 2010 he published Soccer Empire: The World Cup and the Future of France. He is currently preparing a book manuscript on the history of the banjo, for which he has received several awards, including a Mellon New Directions Fellowship, and fellowships from the National Humanities Center and the Guggenheim Foundation. Professor Dubois also served as head historical consultant for a PBS documentary on the Haitian Revolution, which premiered in 2009.

Professor Dubois's upcoming Golz lecture, "Democracy at the Roots: Understanding Haiti's Political Culture," explores three intertwined legacies of the Haitian Revolution on political thought and practice in the country: the largely hostile reaction to it outside the country, the formation of new political institutions and structures, and -- most importantly -- the creation of a new set of cultural, social, and economic structures that Jean Casimir has called the “counter-plantation” system. He identifies both the main currents and critical counter-currents within each of these legacies, calling attention to the aspects of the latter legacies that seem to him to be the most valuable and worth comprehending and nourishing in constructing new Haitian futures.

This talk will also be live streamed on Bowdoin's Live Webcasts page.

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Prof. Sherry Roush, "Haunting Authors, Haunting Us: Writing What the Dead Speak"

Prof. Sherry Roush, "Haunting Authors, Haunting Us: Writing What the Dead Speak"

October 27, 2014 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

Sherry Roush is associate professor of Italian at Penn State University.  She is author of Hermes' Lyre: Italian Poetic Self-Commentary from Dante to Tommaso Campanella (2002), co-editor of The Medieval Marriage Scene: Prudence, Passion and Policy (2005) and editor and translator of Campanella's Selected Philosophical Poems (2011). Her talk presents parts from her current book project investigating the rhetorical power harnessed by Renaissance authors who feign "speaking" with the spirits of the dead in ghost stories, dream visions, and journeys to the afterlife.  The book is forthcoming from the University of Toronto Press under the title Speaking Spirits: Ventriloquizing the Dead in Renaissance Italy.

This event, free and open to the public, is sponsored by the Departments of Romance Languages and English and by the Lectures and Concerts General Fund.

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The Imaginary Invalid by Moliere

The Imaginary Invalid by Moliere

November 8, 2014 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Memorial Hall, Wish Theater

The Imaginary Invalid - By Molière / Adapted by Oded Gross and Tracy Young / Original music by Paul James Prendergast / Lyrics by Oded Gross, Paul James Prendergast and Tracy Young / Originally produced by the Oregon Shakespeare Festival. Directed by Bowdoin professor Abigail Killen of the Department of Theater and Dance.

Argan is a wealthy hypochondriac with a houseful of problems: piles of medical bills, a daughter in love with the wrong man, and a sassy servant all too ready to remind him of his shortcomings. At least his wife is loyal – or is she? This zany Molière mash-up set in 1960s Paris proves once again that laughter is the best medicine.

Free tickets, limited seating. Tickets available at the Smith Union information desk beginning Oct 17 (207-725-3375).  Tickets will also be available at the door.  Tickets expire 15 minutes before performance begins. Patrons must be seated by 6:45 pm.

With generous support from the Alice Cooper Morse Fund for the Performing Arts 

Presented by the Department of Theater and Dance

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Bowdoin Premiere of Disney's Family Favorite "Frozen"

Bowdoin Premiere of Disney's Family Favorite "Frozen"

November 22, 2014 10:00 AM  – 12:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

"Let it go" all over again with Elsa, Anna, Kristoff, and Olaf! Kids and kids-at-heart are invited for this special sing-along screening of the acclaimed Disney film "Frozen."

Free and open to the public. No tickets required. For more information, contact the Bowdoin Cinema Studies Program at 207-725-3552.

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Roundtable Discussion of the Animated Disney Film "Frozen"

Roundtable Discussion of the Animated Disney Film "Frozen"

December 1, 2014 7:45 PM  – 8:30 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

Allison Cooper (Assistant Professor of Romance Languages), Jennifer Scanlon (Professor of Gender and Women's Studies and Associate Dean for Faculty), and others discuss the acclaimed 2013 animated Disney film "Frozen."

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