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English

Fall 2013

Screening of "The Motherhood Archives" with film maker Irene Lusztig

Screening of

September 17, 2013 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Searles Science Building, Room 315

Archival montage, science fiction, and an homage to 70s feminist filmmaking are woven together to form this haunting and lyrical essay film excavating hidden histories of childbirth in the twentieth century. Assembling an extraordinary archive of over 100 educational, industrial, and medical training films (including newly rediscovered Soviet and French childbirth films) THE MOTHERHOOD ARCHIVES inventively untangles the complex, sometimes surprising genealogies of maternal education. From the first use of anesthetic ether in the 19th century to the postmodern 21st century hospital birthing suite, THE MOTHERHOOD ARCHIVES charts a fascinating course through the cultural history of pain, the history of obstetric anesthesia, and the little-known international history of the natural childbirth and Lamaze movements. Revealing a world of intensive training, rehearsal, and performative preparation for the unknown that is ultimately incommensurate with experience, THE MOTHERHOOD ARCHIVES is a meditation on the maternal body as a site of institutional control, ideological surveillance, medical knowledge, and nationalist state intervention.

http://people.ucsc.edu/~ilusztig/projects/motherhoodarchives.html

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Joel Greenberg: "Hope is the Thing with Feathers"

Joel Greenberg:

September 19, 2013 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Joel Greenberg, Research Associate at both 
Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum, Chicago Academy of Sciences, 
and Field Museum, Chicago, IL



Joel has been a birder/naturalist for 45 years, and has shared his love and knowledge of nature and conservation by authoring three books, writing numerous articles, co-hosting a radio show, blogging on Birdzilla.com, and lecturing widely. Since the summer of 2009, he has been working exclusively on passenger pigeons, for he has written the first book on the species in over 50 years. The book, Feathered River Across the Sky:  The Passenger Pigeon’s Flight to Extinction (Bloombury), is scheduled for publication in January 2014.

Joel’s total immersion in the literature over that time has led to his heavy involvement in Project Passenger Pigeon (http://passengerpigeon.org/). 


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Film Screening, Death in Venice, 1971, by Luchino Visconti

Film Screening, Death in Venice, 1971, by Luchino Visconti

September 20, 2013 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

Luchino Visconti's film adaptation of the classic Thomas Mann novella follows an artist to turn-of-the-century Venice, where his search for beauty and sensuality culminates in an extended stay at the Lido. Steven Cerf, George Lincoln Skolfield, Jr. Professor of German will introduce the film. The screening will be followed by a conversation with Cerf, Jill Suzanne Smith, Associate Professor of German, and Joachim Homann, curator. Organized in conjunction with  the exhibition Maurice Prendergast: By the Sea currently on view at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art.

Still from Death in Venice, directed by Luchino Visconti.

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Book Release Celebration with Tricia Welsch - "Gloria Swanson: Ready for Her Close-Up"

Book Release Celebration with Tricia Welsch -

October 3, 2013 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Hubbard Hall, Room 208 Thomas F. Shannon Room

Bowdoin College Associate Professor of Film Studies Tricia Welsch will discuss and present selected readings from her new book, Gloria Swanson: Ready for Her Close-Up.

Welsch's biography trains a spotlight on the talented, self-assured actress whose career spanned seven decades, and also shows how the powerful women of early Hollywood re-invented themselves after their acting lives were over.

Swanson patented inventions and won fashion awards for her clothing designs, was a natural foods activist, exhibited her sculptures, and worked for the United Nations while continuing to act in films, theater, and television.

In the film Sunset Boulevard, Swanson had one of cinema's most famous exit lines--"All right, Mr. DeMille, I'm ready for my close-up." In Welsch's biography, as in her real life, Gloria Swanson remains boldly in the picture.

What the critics are saying about Gloria Swanson: Ready for Her Close-Up:

"I am so glad that Gloria Swanson is at last receiving the attention she deserves." --Kevin Brownlow, author of The Parade's Gone By. . ., filmmaker, and Academy Award recipient for his contributions to film scholarship and film preservation

"(The book) provides a lively, deft, and full account of Swanson's pioneering career and personal life, both of which were informed by a spirit of constant, intrepid reinvention. Welsch has given us the definitive biography of one of the major figures of the performing arts in the twentieth century." --Matthew H. Bernstein, author of Walter Wanger, Hollywood Independent

Copies of Professor Welsch's book are available for sale at the Bowdoin bookstore. This event is free and open to the public.

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Aaron Kitch presents: The Matter with Hamlet

Aaron Kitch presents: The Matter with Hamlet

October 9, 2013 12:00 PM  – 1:00 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

FACULTY SEMINAR SERIES

Aaron Kitch
, Associate Professor of English is the featured speaker. His talk is titled: The Matter with Hamlet.

Open to faculty and staff.
Buffet lunch $3, or bring your own lunch.

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The Salem Witch Trial Archives and Strategies in Digital Humanities

The Salem Witch Trial Archives and Strategies in Digital Humanities

October 10, 2013 4:30 PM  – 6:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Ben Ray, Professor of Religious Studies at University of Virginia, will give a talk for Bowdoin faculty regarding his Salem Witch Trials project - how it got started and why he turned to digital methods. Chats with interested faculty on project ideas for teaching & research will follow the talk.

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Colin Woodard on Watchdog Journalism

Colin Woodard on Watchdog Journalism

October 16, 2013 7:30 PM  – 9:00 PM
Thorne Hall, Daggett Lounge

Watchdog Journalism: The Vital Role of a Threatened Discipline

Colin Woodard, an award-winning author and journalist, is State & National Affairs Writer at the Portland Press Herald and Maine Sunday Telegram, where he recently won a 2012 George Polk Award for his investigative reporting. He is a longtime foreign correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor, The Chronicle of Higher Education and The San Francisco Chronicle. A native of Maine, he has reported from more than fifty foreign countries and six continents, and lived for more than four years in Eastern Europe. He is the author of American Nations: A History of The Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America (Viking Press, 2011), The Republic of Pirates: Being The True and Surprising Story of the Caribbean Pirates and the Man Who Brought Them Down (Harcourt, 2007), the New England bestseller The Lobster Coast: Rebels, Rusticators, and the Struggle for a Forgotten Frontier (Viking Press, 2004), a cultural and environmental history of coastal Maine, and Ocean's End: Travels Through Endangered Seas (Basic Books, 2000), a narrative non-fiction account of the deterioration of the world's oceans. He lives in Midcoast Maine. www.colinwoodard.com

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Galileo, Poetry, and Digital Studies with Crystal Hall

Galileo, Poetry, and Digital Studies with Crystal Hall

October 24, 2013 4:30 PM  – 5:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Crystal Hall, Postdoctoral Fellow with the new Digital and Computational Studies Initiative, explores the challenges and opportunities of digital humanities research through the case study of Galileo Galilei and the ways that the best-selling poetry of his age shaped the expression of his philosophical ideas.

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"Roughhouse Friday" with Jaed Coffin

October 28, 2013 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Massachusetts Hall, Faculty Room

Jaed Muncharoen Coffin will read from Roughhouse Friday, his forthcoming book about the year he fought as the middleweight champion of a barroom boxing show in Juneau, Alaska. He is also the author of A Chant to Soothe Wild Elephants (Da Capo/Perseus 2008), a memoir chronicling his experience as a Buddhist monk in his mother's native village in Thailand.

Coffin is a contributing editor at Maine Magazine, and his work has appeared in numerous magazines and journals, including Nautilus, Jezebel, The Shambhala Sun, The Sun, Post Road, and Down East.  He has been an adjunct instructor at the University of Maine Farmington and the Salt Institute, as well as at the Bread Loaf Writers Conference, the Champlain College Young Writers Conference, the Telling Room, and the Maine Writers and Publishers Alliance, among others.

He served as the 2009 William Sloane Fellow at Bread Loaf Writers Conference, the 2009-10 Wilson Fellow in Creative Writing at Deerfield Academy, and the 2008 Resident Fellow at the Island Institute in Sitka, Alaska.

Coffin is currently on the nonfiction faculty at the University of Southern Maine's Stonecoast MFA and is a Bowdoin College adjunct lecturer in English for the Fall 2013 semester.

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"The Rest of Us: Stories" with Guy Mark Foster

October 30, 2013 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Massachusetts Hall, Faculty Room

"The Rest of Us: Stories" Book Release Celebration with Professor Guy Mark Foster

Bowdoin College Associate Professor of English Guy Mark Foster will read from and discuss his newly released collection of short stories, The Rest of Us: Stories (2013).

The Rest of Us has been described as "a remarkable collection of short stories that embrace the breadth and depth of being a gay African-American ... The boys and men in Guy Mark Foster's tales refuse to be bound by the heavy chains of oppressive religion in the family household or racism encountered on campus."

Of Foster's short story collection, Nisi Shawl, co-author of Writing the Other: Bridging Cultural Differences for Successful Fiction says, ''Love makes us all vulnerable. Guy Mark Foster's exquisitely crafted new collection The Rest of Us cradles that vulnerability in crystal-clear yet cryptic language...The Rest of Us rings true notes, dances surely through complicated steps, and offers intimate, detailed vignettes of heroes who surprise readers and themselves with their despair, determination, and hope.''

Copies of The Rest of Us are available for sale at the Bowdoin Bookstore. This event is free and open to the public.

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Vyjayanthi Selinger and Sree Padma Book Launch

Vyjayanthi Selinger and Sree Padma Book Launch

November 1, 2013 4:00 PM  – 6:00 PM
Massachusetts Hall, Faculty Room

Please join Prof. Vyjayanthi Selinger as she discusses her new book "Authorizing the Shogunate: Ritual and Material Symbolism in the Literary Construction of Warrior Order" and Prof. Sree Padma as she discusses her new book "Vicissitudes of the Goddess: Reconstructions of the Gramadevata in India's Religious Traditions."

Friday, November 1
4:00 - 6:00 p.m.
Mass Hall, Faculty Room

Moderated by Prof. Belinda Kong.

Open to the public, free of charge.
Refreshments will be served.

Sponsored by the Asian Studies Program.



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Queer Matter: Science and Sexuality in the Renaissance

Queer Matter: Science and Sexuality in the Renaissance

November 5, 2013 7:30 PM  – 8:15 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

This inaugural lecture in the "Science Before Science" faculty series and course cluster examines early modern alchemy as a science of generation that had profound implications for defining what it meant to be human and for approaching Nature as an object of study.

Presented by Associate Professor of English Aaron Kitch.

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Winter of Arab Discontent

Winter of Arab Discontent

November 18, 2013 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

As'ad AbuKhalil is a Lebanese-American professor of political science at California State University, Stanislaus. AbuKhalil is the author of Historical Dictionary of Lebanon (1998), Bin Laden, Islam & America's New "War on Terrorism" (2002), and The Battle for Saudi Arabia (2004). He maintains a blog, The Angry Arab News Service. He will be discussing trends in the Middle East in the age of uprising.

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Scenes from Molière's Tartuffe

Scenes from Molière's Tartuffe

November 21, 2013 6:30 PM  – 7:30 PM
Massachusetts Hall, Faculty Room

Scenes from Moliere's Tartuffe

Presented by the students of French 2409
6:30-7:30 pm

Mass Hall Faculty

Summaries will be provided in French and in English
Open to the Bowdoin community

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Staged Reading of the Normal Heart

Staged Reading of the Normal Heart

November 25, 2013 7:00 PM  – 9:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

A staged reading of The Normal Heart, by Larry Kramer, as part of AIDS Awareness Month. The Normal Heart shows the struggle of the gay community in New York City to combat the emergence of the AIDS epidemic. A panel discussion will follow the play, featuring Whitney Hogan (Peer Health) and Peter Coviello (Gay & Lesbian Studies). Directed by Jamie Weisbach, '16." Presented through special arrangement with Samuel French Inc.

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"Into the Apothecary," a Reading by Poet Heather Treseler

December 3, 2013 4:30 PM  – 6:15 PM
Massachusetts Hall, Faculty Room

Heather Treseler will read from her work-in-progress "Into the Apothecary."

Treseler is an assistant professor at Worcester State University, and her poems have appeared in Harvard Review, Iowa Review, Pleiades, Notre Dame Review, and other journals. Her work has been supported by the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She is a contributing editor at Boulevard.

Free and open to the public

Sponsored by:
The English Department Visiting Writers Fund and
From the Fishhouse.

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"Their Eyes Were Watching God"

December 5, 2013 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

Revisiting Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God

Bowdoin Book Lecture by Guy Mark Foster, associate professor of English

About the novel:
First published at the closing years of the Harlem Renaissance, in 1937, Their Eyes Were Watching God has since become a landmark text within the African American women's literary tradition. The novel's black female protagonist, Janie Crawford, experiences more than her share of joy and tragedy as she embarks on a series of intimate relationships with three different men, each of whom has a significant role to play in this character's colorful and tumultuous journey to self-knowledge. Along the way, Janie learns a great deal about the world of men and women during an era of racial inequality, as well as her own capacity to love and endure. Many early critics considered Their Eyes to be somewhat anomalous, as most black writers during this period chose to center the narrative of racial conflict between the races in their writings. Hurston's novel is an exception.

About the speaker:
Guy Mark Foster teaches courses in African American literature as well as Gay and Lesbian Studies at Bowdoin College. He has published critical essays on such diverse topics as interracial intimacy, black female identity, the contemporary romance novel, and LGBTQ representation in popular culture. He is presently revising a book-length manuscript entitled, "Waking up to the Enemy: Towards a New Ethics of Interracial Intimacy in African American Literature." Also a fiction writer, Professor Foster's short story collection, The Rest of Us, was recently published by Lethe Press.

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Bowdoin Book Lecture

Bowdoin Book Lecture

February 4, 2014 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

"Room for Wonder: Loving Children in Late James"
What Maisie Knew by Henry James, a lecture by Peter Coviello,
Professor of English, Bowdoin College.

What Maisie Knew, from 1897, is one of the funniest and most sparkling, but also strangest and saddest of the novels of Henry James. In the gorgeous prolix sentences for which the author (especially in this, his later period) was famed, it traces the fate of young Maisie Farange, whose parents divorce and divide custody of her, as she is propelled through a world of rivalry, marital bitterness, and sexual intrigue. It asks again and again: what is a child's love like? And what are the intricacies of loving children? Peter Coviello

Peter Coviello is Professor of English at Bowdoin College, where he has served as Chair of the departments of English, Africana Studies, and Gay and Lesbian Studies. He has written about Walt Whitman, the history of sexuality, queer children, 18th- and 19th-century American literature, Mormon polygamy, stepparenthood, pop music, and much besides. His work has appeared in several books most recently Tomorrow's Parties: Sex and the Untimely in Nineteenth-Century America (NYU 2013) and in a range of quarterlies, as well as in venues like Raritan and Frieze and The Believer. His newest work is called How to Do Things With Joy.

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