Spring 2015

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EDUC 1101. Contemporary American Education.
What are the purposes of public education and what makes it “public”? Do schools serve an individual good or a collective good? Is America’s “system” of public education organized to serve these purposes? What is the public’s responsibility towards public education? How do current school reforms affect various stakeholders? The primary objective of this course is to examine the cultural, social, economic and institutional dilemmas confronting public schooling in the United States today. By approaching these dilemmas as unsolved puzzles instead of systematic failures, we will gain important insights into the challenges confronting a democratic society historically committed to the public provision of education. Considers which theories and purposes of education motivate current reform efforts. Likewise, examines who shapes public discourse about public education and by what strategies. Employs a mixed approach of reading, discussion, and class-based activities to explore important educational issues including school reform and finance, charter schools, busing, and vouchers, unequal educational opportunities and outcomes, and accountability, standardization and testing.
EDUC 2203. Educating All Students.
An examination of the economic, social, political, and pedagogical implications of universal education in American classrooms. Focuses on the right of every child, including physically handicapped, learning disabled, and gifted, to equal educational opportunity. Requires a minimum of twenty-four hours of observation in a local secondary school.
EDUC 2221. Democracy’s Citadel: Education and Citizenship in America.
Examines the relationship between education, citizenship, and democracy in America. Questions explored include: What does “public” mean and how necessary is a “public” to democracy? Is there something “democratic” about how Americans choose to govern their schools? What does “citizenship” mean? Is education a public good with a collective economic and civic benefit, a private good with benefits to individuals whose future earnings depend on the quality of their education, or some combination of the two? What type of curriculum is most important for civic education and how should it be taught? What policies are necessary to prevent economic inequality from undermining education’s role in fostering democratic citizenship? To what extent are the concepts of “education for democracy” and “democratic education” related?
EDUC 2260. Science Education: Purpose, Policy, and Potential.
Why do all Americans need to learn science and what are we doing to improve science education in our schools? With the release of the Next Generation Science Standards and in response to America’s poor standing on international assessments of math and science, there has been a shift in public interest and dialogue around why and how we teach science that is reminiscent of the 1950s. In this class we will consider the goals of science education in the United States and explore research and policy related to science curriculum, teaching practice and student learning.
EDUC 3303. Student Teaching Practicum.
Required of all students who seek secondary public school certification, this final course in the student teaching sequence requires that students work full time in a local secondary school from early January to late April. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. Education 3304 (304) must be taken concurrently. Students must complete an application and interview. Students with the following are eligible for this course: Education 2203 (203), 3301 (30)}, and 3302 (303); junior or senior standing; a cumulative 3.0 grade point average; a 3.0 grade point average in Education 3301 (301) and 3302 (303); and eight courses in a subject area that enables them to be certified by the State of Maine (English: eight courses in English; world language: eight courses in the language; life science: six courses in biology and two additional courses in biology, biochemistry, or neuroscience; mathematics: eight courses in mathematics; physical science: six courses in chemistry, earth and oceanographic science, or physics, and one course in each of the other departments listed; or social studies: six courses in history (at least two must be non-United States history) and one course each in two of the following departments: anthropology, economics, government, psychology, or sociology).
EDUC 3304. Bowdoin Teacher Scholars Seminar.
Taken concurrently with Education 3303 (302), Student Teaching Practicum. Considers theoretical and practical issues related to effective classroom instruction. Students with the following are eligible for this course: Education 2203 (203), 3301 (301), and 3302 (303); junior or senior standing; a cumulative 3.0 grade point average; a 3.0 grade point average in Education 3301 (301) and 3302 (303); and eight courses in a subject area that enables them to be certified by the State of Maine (English: eight courses in English; world language: eight courses in the language; life science: six courses in biology and two additional courses in biology, biochemistry, or neuroscience; mathematics: eight courses in mathematics; physical science: six courses in chemistry, earth and oceanographic science, or physics, and one course in each of the other departments listed; or social studies: six courses in history (at least two must be non-United States history) and one course each in two of the following departments: anthropology, economics, government, psychology, or sociology).