Fall 2013 Courses

  • Please note that for the 2013-14 academic year, official course numbers are now four digits. This page only shows the older three-digit course numbers. If you need to see both the old and the new numbers, consult the College Catalogue.
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015. Urban Education
Doris Santoro T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55
Explores the experiences of various stakeholders: students, parents, teachers, educational leaders, unions, local residents, and non-profit and educational management organizations; and the roles of urban public schools in their communities. Films and readings examine representations of urban students, their teachers, and their schools; analyze the purposes, challenges, and possibilities of urban education, consider schools’ relationships to the cities in which they are located; and interrogate the politics of urban teaching. Investigates urban schools as sites of promise and innovation as well as sites for social and political struggle.
101. Contemporary American Education
Doris Santoro T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55
Examines current educational issues in the United States and the role schools play in society. Topics include the purpose of schooling; school funding and governance; issues of race, class, and gender; school choice; and the reform movements of the 1990s. The role of schools and colleges in society’s pursuit of equality and excellence forms the backdrop of this study.
203. Educating All Students
Kathryn Byrnes T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
An examination of the economic, social, political, and pedagogical implications of universal education in American classrooms. Focuses on the right of every child, including physically handicapped, learning disabled, and gifted, to equal educational opportunity. Requires a minimum of twenty-four hours of observation in a local secondary school.
206. Sociology of Education
Ingrid Nelson T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
Examines the ways that formal schooling influences individuals and the ways that social structures and processes affect educational institutions. Explores the manifest and latent functions of education in modern society; the role education plays in stratification and social reproduction; the relationship between education and cultural capital; the dynamics of race, class, and gender in education; and other topics.
222. Educational Psychology
Kathryn Byrnes T 6:30 - 9:25
Examines theories of how people learn and the implications of those theories for the education of students, particularly those who have been traditionally underserved in the United States. Course concepts will be grounded in empirical research and authentic activities geared towards understanding the nuances and complexities of perspectives on behavior, cognition, development, motivation, sociocultural identities and pedagogy in PK-12 educational contexts. Insights for the ways educators can structure learning experiences to better serve students’ needs from a variety of backgrounds will be cultivated through a field placement working with students.
251. Teaching Writing: Theory and Practice
Kathleen O'Connor T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55
Explores theories and methods of teaching writing, emphasizing collaborative learning and peer tutoring. Examines relationships between the writing process and the written product, writing and learning, and language and communities. Investigates disciplinary writing conventions, influences of gender and culture on language and learning, and concerns of ESL and learning disabled writers. Students practice and reflect on revising, responding to others’ writing, and conducting conferences. Prepares students to serve as writing assistants for the Writing Project.
265. Place-Based Education
Casey Meehan M 8:00 - 9:25, W 8:00 - 9:25
One critique of K-12 schooling is that it separates the learning happening within the school walls from the places people inhabit. Place-based education is a form of education that seeks to connect students' learning with the community and the local natural and built environment. This course explores the history, theory, and practice of place-based education with special attention given to the prospects and challenges of using this framework in formal K-12 educational settings. Instruction models tenets of place-based pedagogy to actively engage participants in learning about the course material and the community in which we reside.
301. Teaching and Learning
Nancy Jennings M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25
A study of what takes place in classrooms: the methods and purposes of teachers, the response of students, and the organizational context. Readings and discussions help inform students’ direct observations and written accounts of local classrooms. Peer teaching is an integral part of the course experience. Requires a minimum of thirty-six hours of observation in a local secondary school. Education 3302 {303} must be taken concurrently with this course. In order to qualify for this course students must have Education 1101 {101} and 2203 {203}; junior or senior standing; a concentration in a core secondary school subject area (English: four courses in English; foreign language: four courses in the language; life science: four courses in biology; mathematics: four courses in mathematics; physical science: three courses in chemistry, earth and oceanographic science, or physics and one course in one of the other departments listed; or social studies: three courses in history and one course in anthropology, economics, government, psychology, or sociology); and permission of the instructor.
303. Curriculum
Nancy Jennings M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55
A study of the knowledge taught in schools; its selection and the rationale by which one course of study rather than another is included; its adaptation for different disciplines and for different categories of students; its cognitive and social purposes; the organization and integration of its various components. Education 3301 {301} must be taken concurrently with this course. In order to qualify for this course, students must have Education 1101 {101} and 2203 {203}; junior or senior standing; and a concentration in a core secondary school subject area (English: four courses in English; foreign language: four courses in the language; life science: four courses in biology; mathematics: four courses in mathematics; physical science: three courses in chemistry, earth and oceanographic science, or physics and one course in one of the other departments listed; or social studies: three courses in history and one course in anthropology, economics, government, psychology, or sociology).