Fall 2011 Courses

020. The Educational Crusade
Charles Dorn M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25
Why do you go to school? What is the central purpose of public education in the United States? Should public schools prepare students for college? The workforce? Competent citizenship? Who makes these decisions and through what policy process are they implemented? Explores the ways that public school reformers have answered such questions, from the “Common School Crusaders” of the early nineteenth century to present advocates of “No Child Left Behind.” Examining public education as both a product of social, political, and economic change and as a force in molding American society, highlights enduring tensions in the development and practice of public schooling in a democratic republic.
101. Contemporary American Education
Mariana Cruz T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
Examines current educational issues in the United States and the role schools play in society. Topics include the purpose of schooling; school funding and governance; issues of race, class, and gender; school choice; and the reform movements of the 1990s. The role of schools and colleges in society’s pursuit of equality and excellence forms the backdrop of this study.
101. Contemporary American Education
Doris Santoro M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25
Examines current educational issues in the United States and the role schools play in society. Topics include the purpose of schooling; school funding and governance; issues of race, class, and gender; school choice; and the reform movements of the 1990s. The role of schools and colleges in society’s pursuit of equality and excellence forms the backdrop of this study.
203. Educating All Students
Kathryn Byrnes T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25
An examination of the economic, social, political, and pedagogical implications of universal education in American classrooms. Focuses on the right of every child, including physically handicapped, learning disabled, and gifted, to equal educational opportunity. Requires a minimum of twenty-four hours of observation in a local elementary school.
211. Education and the Human Condition
Doris Santoro M 8:00 - 9:25, W 8:00 - 9:25
Explores the relationship between education and being/becoming human. Topics may be guided by the questions: What does it mean to be an educated person? How can education lead to emancipation? How might teaching and learning lead to the good life? What is our responsibility to teach the next generation? Readings may include works by Hannah Arendt, John Dewey, W.E.B. DuBois, Plato, Jacques Rancière, among others.
250. Education and Law
George Isaacson M 8:00 - 9:25, W 8:00 - 9:25
A study of the impact of the American legal system on the functioning of schools in the United States through an examination of Supreme Court decisions and federal legislation. Analyzes the public policy considerations that underlie court decisions in the field of education and considers how those judicial interests may differ from the concerns of school boards, administrators, and teachers. Issues to be discussed include constitutional and statutory developments affecting schools in such areas as free speech, sex discrimination, religious objections to compulsory education, race relations, teachers’ rights, school financing, and education of the handicapped.
251. Teaching Writing: Theory and Practice
Kathleen O'Connor T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55
Explores theories and methods of teaching writing, emphasizing collaborative learning and peer tutoring. Examines relationships between the writing process and the written product, writing and learning, and language and communities. Investigates disciplinary writing conventions, influences of gender and culture on language and learning, and concerns of ESL and learning disabled writers. Students practice and reflect on revising, responding to others’ writing, and conducting conferences. Prepares students to serve as writing assistants for the Writing Project.
301. Teaching
Nancy Jennings T 8:00 - 8:55, TH 8:00 - 8:55, F 8:00 - 8:55
A study of what takes place in classrooms: the methods and purposes of teachers, the response of students, and the organizational context. Readings and discussions help inform students’ direct observations and written accounts of local classrooms. Peer teaching is an integral part of the course experience. Requires a minimum of thirty-six hours of observation in a local secondary school. Education 303 must be taken concurrently with this course.
303. Curriculum
Kathryn Byrnes T 9:00 - 9:55, TH 9:00 - 9:55, F 9:00 - 9:55
A study of the knowledge taught in schools; its selection and the rationale by which one course of study rather than another is included; its adaptation for different disciplines and for different categories of students; its cognitive and social purposes; the organization and integration of its various components. Education 301 must be taken concurrently with this course.
310. The Civic Functions of Higher Education
Charles Dorn M 10:00 - 11:25, W 10:00 - 11:25
What does it mean for an institution of higher education to act in the public interest? How have interpretations of higher education’s public service role changed throughout history? In what ways might a college, such as Bowdoin, fulfill its institutional commitment to promote the “common good”? Examines the civic functions adopted by and ascribed to institutions of higher education in America, from the seventeenth century to the present. Students investigate both how colleges and universities have employed civic rhetoric to advance institutional agendas and how societal expectations of civic responsibility have shaped these institutions over time. Students survey relevant literature in the history of liberal arts colleges, research universities, women’s colleges, and historically Black colleges and universities; learn how historians frame questions, gather and interpret evidence, and draw conclusions; and conduct archival research, culminating in a case study of one institution’s historically defined civic purpose.