Spring 2010 Courses

101. Principles of Microeconomics
Bibi Khan M  1:00 - 2:25
W  1:00 - 2:25
Druckenmiller-020
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on the allocation of resources through markets. The theory of demand, supply, cost, and market structure is developed and then applied to problems in antitrust policy, environmental quality, energy, education, health, the role of the corporation in society, income distribution, and poverty. Students desiring a comprehensive introduction to economic reasoning should take both Economics 101 and 102.
101. Principles of Microeconomics
Guillermo Herrera T  10:00 - 11:25
TH 10:00 - 11:25
Searles-223
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on the allocation of resources through markets. The theory of demand, supply, cost, and market structure is developed and then applied to problems in antitrust policy, environmental quality, energy, education, health, the role of the corporation in society, income distribution, and poverty. Students desiring a comprehensive introduction to economic reasoning should take both Economics 101 and 102.
101. Principles of Microeconomics
Rachel Connelly M  11:30 - 12:55
W  11:30 - 12:55
Searles-215
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on the allocation of resources through markets. The theory of demand, supply, cost, and market structure is developed and then applied to problems in antitrust policy, environmental quality, energy, education, health, the role of the corporation in society, income distribution, and poverty. Students desiring a comprehensive introduction to economic reasoning should take both Economics 101 and 102.
102. Principles of Macroeconomics
Yao Tang T  8:30 - 9:55
TH 8:30 - 9:55
Searles-217
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on determinants of the level of national income, prices, and employment. Current problems of inflation and unemployment are explored with the aid of such analysis, and alternative views of the effectiveness of fiscal, monetary, and other governmental policies are analyzed. Attention is given to the sources and consequences of economic growth and to the nature and significance of international linkages through goods and capital markets.
102. Principles of Macroeconomics
Paola Boel T  2:30 - 3:55
TH 2:30 - 3:55
Druckenmiller-020
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on determinants of the level of national income, prices, and employment. Current problems of inflation and unemployment are explored with the aid of such analysis, and alternative views of the effectiveness of fiscal, monetary, and other governmental policies are analyzed. Attention is given to the sources and consequences of economic growth and to the nature and significance of international linkages through goods and capital markets.
102. Principles of Macroeconomics
John Fitzgerald T  1:00 - 2:25
TH 1:00 - 2:25
Searles-215
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on determinants of the level of national income, prices, and employment. Current problems of inflation and unemployment are explored with the aid of such analysis, and alternative views of the effectiveness of fiscal, monetary, and other governmental policies are analyzed. Attention is given to the sources and consequences of economic growth and to the nature and significance of international linkages through goods and capital markets.
102. Principles of Macroeconomics
Stephen Meardon M  11:30 - 12:55
W  11:30 - 12:55
Searles-126
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on determinants of the level of national income, prices, and employment. Current problems of inflation and unemployment are explored with the aid of such analysis, and alternative views of the effectiveness of fiscal, monetary, and other governmental policies are analyzed. Attention is given to the sources and consequences of economic growth and to the nature and significance of international linkages through goods and capital markets.
211. Poverty and Redistribution
John Fitzgerald T  10:00 - 11:25
TH 10:00 - 11:25
Searles-213
Examines the causes and consequences of poverty and inequality in the United States and analyzes policy responses. Topics include social welfare theory, poverty measurement, discrimination, rising wage inequality, the working poor, and consequences of poverty for families and subsequent generations. Substantial focus on benefit-cost analysis and experimental and non-experimental evaluations of current policy, including welfare reform, education and training, and employment programs. Makes limited use of comparisons to other countries. Note: This course counts toward the major and minor in gender and women’s studies.
212. Labor and Human Resource Economics
Rachel Connelly M  1:00 - 2:25
W  1:00 - 2:25
Searles-215
A study of labor market supply and demand, with special emphasis on human resource policies, human capital formation, and wage inequality. Note: This course counts toward the major and minor in gender and women’s studies.
238. Economic History of American Enterprise
Bibi Khan M  10:00 - 11:25
W  10:00 - 11:25
Adams-406
Considers the history of American enterprise over the past two centuries. First examines key issues in the economics of the firm, entrepreneurship, and innovation during the nineteenth century (the period of the second industrial revolution). Then addresses these issues from a more recent perspective (the so-called third industrial revolution). Assesses what lessons for the twenty-first century can be learned from an examination of the development of enterprise since the nineteenth century; and analyzes the extent to which today’s “New Economy” raises novel questions for economic theory and its applications. Not open to students who have credit for Economics 208 or Economics 348.
239. Topics on Asian Economies
Yao Tang M  11:30 - 12:55
W  11:30 - 12:55
Searles-223
A study of the similarities and differences in growth experience and the level of economic output per person in Asian countries. Explores possible causes of differences in economic paths, with a focus on several important economies, including China and Japan. Also discusses the relationship between the Asian economies and the U.S. economy.
255. Microeconomics
Joon-Suk Lee M  1:00 - 2:25
W  1:00 - 2:25
Searles-223
An intermediate-level study of contemporary microeconomic theory. Analysis of the theory of resource allocation and distribution, with major emphasis on systems of markets and prices as a social mechanism for making resource allocation decisions. Topics include the theory of individual choice and demand, the theory of the firm, market equilibrium under competition and monopoly, general equilibrium theory, and welfare economics.
256. Macroeconomics
Paola Boel T  11:30 - 12:55
TH 11:30 - 12:55
Druckenmiller-004
An intermediate-level study of contemporary national income, employment, and inflation theory. Consumption, investment, government receipts, government expenditures, money, and interest rates are examined for their determinants, interrelationships, and role in determining the level of aggregate economic activity. Policy implications are drawn from the analysis.
257. Economic Statistics
Jonathan Goldstein T  1:00 - 2:25
TH 1:00 - 2:25
Searles-113
An introduction to the data and statistical methods used in economics. A review of the systems that generate economic data and the accuracy of such data is followed by an examination of the statistical methods used in testing the hypotheses of economic theory, both micro- and macro-. Probability, random variables and their distributions, methods of estimating parameters, hypothesis testing, regression, and correlation are covered. The application of multiple regression to economic problems is stressed. Students who have taken Mathematics 265 are encouraged to take Economics 316 instead of this course.
302. Business Cycles
Jonathan Goldstein T  10:00 - 11:25
TH 10:00 - 11:25
Hubbard-22
Seminar. A survey of competing theories of the business cycle, empirical tests of cycle theories, and appropriate macro stabilization policies. Topics include descriptive and historical analysis of cyclical fluctuations in the United States, Keynesian-Kaleckian multiplier-accelerator models, growth cycle models, theories of financial instability, Marxian crisis theory, new classical and new Keynesian theories, and international aspects of business cycles. The current global financial crisis is also analyzed.
318. Environmental and Resource Economics
Guillermo Herrera T  1:00 - 2:25
TH 1:00 - 2:25
The Hazelton Room (Kanbar 109)
Seminar. Analysis of externalities and market failure; models of optimum control of pollution and efficient management of renewable and nonrenewable natural resources such as fisheries, forests, and minerals; governmental vs. other forms of control of common-pool resources; and benefit-cost analysis of policies, including market-based and non-market valuation. Not open to students who have credit for Economics 218 (Same as Environmental Studies 218) or 228 (Same as Environmental Studies 228).
355. Game Theory and Strategic Behavior
Joon-Suk Lee M  10:00 - 11:25
W  10:00 - 11:25
Searles-223
An introduction to game theory, a theory analyzing and characterizing optimal strategic behavior. Strategic behavior takes into account other individuals’ options and decisions. Such behavior is relevant in economics and business, politics, and other areas of the social sciences, where game theory is an important tool. The main game theoretic equilibrium concepts are introduced in class and applied to a variety of economics and business problems. Elementary calculus and probability theory are used.
360. Finance II
Gregory DeCoster T  2:30 - 3:55
TH 2:30 - 3:55
Searles-215
A continuation of Economics 260. The focus is essentially two-fold: (1) What are the sources of business value, and how can it be created? (2) How can the uncertainty and risk inherent to intertemporal choices, i.e., capital accumulation, be “managed”? Involves analysis of business strategy with regard to both operations and financing decisions; the pricing and uses of financial derivatives (i.e., futures, options, and swaps); sources of risk and basic risk management techniques; and an examination of recent insights from behavioral finance.