Location: Bowdoin / Economics / Courses / Spring 2009

Economics

Spring 2009

100. Introduction to the Economy
Gregory DeCoster W 2:30 - 3:55
A non-technical introduction to the operation of modern capitalist economies, with a focus on the United States. Emphasizes use of a small number of fundamental concepts to clarify how economies function and to provide a foundation for informed evaluation of contemporary economic debates. Topics include incentives, decision-making, markets as a means of allocating resources, characteristics of market allocation, measures and history of U.S. economic performance, structure and function of the financial system, sources of economic growth, and business cycles. Periodic discussions of the role of government in the economy. Seeks to provide a level of economic literacy adequate to understanding debates as conducted in the popular press. Appropriate for all students, but intended for non-majors. Does not satisfy the prerequisites for any other course in the Department of Economics.

101. Principles of Microeconomics
Rachel Connelly T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on the allocation of resources through markets. The theory of demand, supply, cost, and market structure is developed and then applied to problems in antitrust policy, environmental quality, energy, education, health, the role of the corporation in society, income distribution, and poverty. Students desiring a comprehensive introduction to economic reasoning should take both Economics 101 and 102.

101. Principles of Microeconomics
Deborah DeGraff M 8:00 - 9:25, W 8:00 - 9:25
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on the allocation of resources through markets. The theory of demand, supply, cost, and market structure is developed and then applied to problems in antitrust policy, environmental quality, energy, education, health, the role of the corporation in society, income distribution, and poverty. Students desiring a comprehensive introduction to economic reasoning should take both Economics 101 and 102.

101. Principles of Microeconomics
Guillermo Herrera T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on the allocation of resources through markets. The theory of demand, supply, cost, and market structure is developed and then applied to problems in antitrust policy, environmental quality, energy, education, health, the role of the corporation in society, income distribution, and poverty. Students desiring a comprehensive introduction to economic reasoning should take both Economics 101 and 102.

101. Principles of Microeconomics
Zorina Khan M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on the allocation of resources through markets. The theory of demand, supply, cost, and market structure is developed and then applied to problems in antitrust policy, environmental quality, energy, education, health, the role of the corporation in society, income distribution, and poverty. Students desiring a comprehensive introduction to economic reasoning should take both Economics 101 and 102.

102. Principles of Macroeconomics
Julian Diaz T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on determinants of the level of national income, prices, and employment. Current problems of inflation and unemployment are explored with the aid of such analysis, and alternative views of the effectiveness of fiscal, monetary, and other governmental policies are analyzed. Attention is given to the sources and consequences of economic growth and to the nature and significance of international linkages through goods and capital markets.

102. Principles of Macroeconomics
John Fitzgerald T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on determinants of the level of national income, prices, and employment. Current problems of inflation and unemployment are explored with the aid of such analysis, and alternative views of the effectiveness of fiscal, monetary, and other governmental policies are analyzed. Attention is given to the sources and consequences of economic growth and to the nature and significance of international linkages through goods and capital markets.

102. Principles of Macroeconomics
Jonathan Goldstein T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on determinants of the level of national income, prices, and employment. Current problems of inflation and unemployment are explored with the aid of such analysis, and alternative views of the effectiveness of fiscal, monetary, and other governmental policies are analyzed. Attention is given to the sources and consequences of economic growth and to the nature and significance of international linkages through goods and capital markets.

213. History of Economic Thought
Stephen Meardon M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55
A historical study of insights and methods of inquiry into the functions of markets and the role of government in shaping them. Readings include the original works of economic thinkers from the eighteenth to twentieth centuries, including Adam Smith, David Ricardo, Henry Carey, Karl Marx, Henry George, Thorstein Veblen, and John Maynard Keynes, among others. Different historiographical approaches are employed, including examination of the problems motivating past thinkers as well as the relevance of their ideas to modern economics.

223. Africa’s Economic Prospects: Globalization and Economic Institutions
John Todd T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25
An examination of the factors that have affected Africa’s recent economic development, including geography and history, globalization, international aid, and political and economic management. Particular attention is paid to the interests and strategies of the many players in this field—both external (multinationals, NGOs, and aid agencies) and internal (governments, civil society, local businesses, and citizens). Tools of economic analysis are used to help understand the potential roles of international trade, foreign investment, aid, and domestic policy changes in achieving higher rates of economic growth in the next ten to fifteen years. Each student follows a particular country throughout the semester.

236. Health Economics and Policy
June O'Leary T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55
An introduction to health economics and policy analysis as applied to the interdisciplinary field of public health. No knowledge of public health or healthcare systems is necessary. Begins with an overview of the United States healthcare system as a way to introduce terminology and concepts (e.g., managed care) before proceeding with more specific issues and their analysis. Basic microeconomic theory will serve as the conceptual model for the study of topics such as the demand for healthcare and insurance, the market for physician and hospital services, and public programs such as Medicare. In addition, the limitations of the economic approach in the analysis of healthcare will be raised throughout the course. Assignments will focus on learning how to analyze important health policy issues through the application of basic economic principles.

255. Microeconomics
John Fitzgerald T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
An intermediate-level study of contemporary microeconomic theory. Analysis of the theory of resource allocation and distribution, with major emphasis on systems of markets and prices as a social mechanism for making resource allocation decisions. Topics include the theory of individual choice and demand, the theory of the firm, market equilibrium under competition and monopoly, general equilibrium theory, and welfare economics.

256. Macroeconomics
Julian Diaz T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
An intermediate-level study of contemporary national income, employment, and inflation theory. Consumption, investment, government receipts, government expenditures, money, and interest rates are examined for their determinants, interrelationships, and role in determining the level of aggregate economic activity. Policy implications are drawn from the analysis.

257. Economic Statistics
Jonathan Goldstein T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25
An introduction to the data and statistical methods used in economics. A review of the systems that generate economic data and the accuracy of such data is followed by an examination of the statistical methods used in testing the hypotheses of economic theory, both micro- and macro-. Probability, random variables and their distributions, methods of estimating parameters, hypothesis testing, regression, and correlation are covered. The application of multiple regression to economic problems is stressed. Students who have taken Mathematics 265 are encouraged to take Economics 316 instead of this course.

301. The Economics of the Family
Rachel Connelly T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55
Seminar. Microeconomic analysis of the family—gender roles, and related institutions. Topics include marriage, fertility, married women’s labor supply, divorce, and the family as an economic organization.

318. Environmental and Resource Economics
Guillermo Herrera T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25
Seminar. Analysis of externalities and market failure; models of optimum control of pollution and efficient management of renewable and nonrenewable natural resources such as fisheries, forests, and minerals; governmental vs. other forms of control of common-pool resources; and benefit-cost analysis of policies, including market-based and non-market valuation. Not open to students who have credit for Economics 218 or 228.

348. Research in Economic History
Zorina Khan M 10:00 - 11:25, W 10:00 - 11:25
Seminar. Investigates the sources of economic growth and development using cliometrics, or the quantitative study of economic history. Students are required to apply economic theories and methodology to the analysis of primary historical materials in order to produce a professional-quality research paper. Not open to students who have taken Economics 208.

360. Finance II
Gregory DeCoster T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55
A continuation of Economics 260. The focus is essentially two-fold: (1) What are the sources of business value, and how can it be created? (2) How can the uncertainty and risk inherent to intertemporal choices, i.e., capital accumulation, be “managed”? Involves analysis of business strategy with regard to both operations and financing decisions; the pricing and uses of financial derivatives (i.e., futures, options, and swaps); sources of risk and basic risk management techniques; and an examination of recent insights from behavioral finance.