Location: Bowdoin / Economics / Courses

Economics

Fall 2014

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ECON 1027. The Quiet Revolution: Women, Work, and Family in the Twentieth Century.
Explores the revolutionary changes in fertility, marriage, divorce, educational attainment and employment affecting all aspects of women’s lives that occurred over the course of the twentieth century (and onto today). From Lillian Gilbreth (the mother in the book, Cheaper by the Dozen, who was one of the first working female engineers holding a PhD) to Rosie the Riveter; from June Cleaver to Murphy Brown; from “Opting Out” to “Leaning In,” these changes are all around us. Focuses mainly on women in developed countries. Students are not required to have any prior knowledge of economics.
ECON 1050. Introductory Microeconomics and Quantitative Reasoning.
A quantitative reasoning supported introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on the allocation of resources through markets. Covers the same content as Economics 1101 with added instruction in the quantitative skills used in modern microeconomics, providing a firm foundation for further coursework in economics. Students desiring a comprehensive introduction to economic reasoning should take both this course (or Economics 1101) and 1102 (102). To ensure proper placement, students must fill out economics department placement form and must be recommended for placement in Economics 1050. Not open to students have taken Economics 1101.
ECON 1101A. Principles of Microeconomics.
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on the allocation of resources through markets. The theory of demand, supply, cost, and market structure is developed and then applied to problems in antitrust policy, environmental quality, energy, education, health, the role of the corporation in society, income distribution, and poverty. Students desiring a comprehensive introduction to economic reasoning should take both Economics 1101 (101) and 1102 (102). For proper placement students should fill out the economics placement request form and must be recommended for placement in Economics 1101. Not open to students who have taken Economics 1050.
ECON 1101B. Principles of Microeconomics.
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on the allocation of resources through markets. The theory of demand, supply, cost, and market structure is developed and then applied to problems in antitrust policy, environmental quality, energy, education, health, the role of the corporation in society, income distribution, and poverty. Students desiring a comprehensive introduction to economic reasoning should take both Economics 1101 (101) and 1102 (102). For proper placement students should fill out the economics placement request form and must be recommended for placement in Economics 1101. Not open to students who have taken Economics 1050.
ECON 1101C. Principles of Microeconomics.
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on the allocation of resources through markets. The theory of demand, supply, cost, and market structure is developed and then applied to problems in antitrust policy, environmental quality, energy, education, health, the role of the corporation in society, income distribution, and poverty. Students desiring a comprehensive introduction to economic reasoning should take both Economics 1101 (101) and 1102 (102). For proper placement students should fill out the economics placement request form and must be recommended for placement in Economics 1101. Not open to students who have taken Economics 1050.
ECON 1101D. Principles of Microeconomics.
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on the allocation of resources through markets. The theory of demand, supply, cost, and market structure is developed and then applied to problems in antitrust policy, environmental quality, energy, education, health, the role of the corporation in society, income distribution, and poverty. Students desiring a comprehensive introduction to economic reasoning should take both Economics 1101 (101) and 1102 (102). For proper placement students should fill out the economics placement request form and must be recommended for placement in Economics 1101. Not open to students who have taken Economics 1050.
ECON 1101E. Principles of Microeconomics.
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on the allocation of resources through markets. The theory of demand, supply, cost, and market structure is developed and then applied to problems in antitrust policy, environmental quality, energy, education, health, the role of the corporation in society, income distribution, and poverty. Students desiring a comprehensive introduction to economic reasoning should take both Economics 1101 (101) and 1102 (102). For proper placement students should fill out the economics placement request form and must be recommended for placement in Economics 1101. Not open to students who have taken Economics 1050.
ECON 1102A. Principles of Macroeconomics.
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on determinants of the level of national income, prices, and employment. Current problems of inflation and unemployment are explored with the aid of such analysis, and alternative views of the effectiveness of fiscal, monetary, and other governmental policies are analyzed. Attention is given to the sources and consequences of economic growth and to the nature and significance of international linkages through goods and capital markets.
ECON 1102B. Principles of Macroeconomics.
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on determinants of the level of national income, prices, and employment. Current problems of inflation and unemployment are explored with the aid of such analysis, and alternative views of the effectiveness of fiscal, monetary, and other governmental policies are analyzed. Attention is given to the sources and consequences of economic growth and to the nature and significance of international linkages through goods and capital markets.
ECON 1102C. Principles of Macroeconomics.
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on determinants of the level of national income, prices, and employment. Current problems of inflation and unemployment are explored with the aid of such analysis, and alternative views of the effectiveness of fiscal, monetary, and other governmental policies are analyzed. Attention is given to the sources and consequences of economic growth and to the nature and significance of international linkages through goods and capital markets.
ECON 2210. Economics of the Public Sector.
Theoretical and applied evaluation of government activities and the role of government in the economy. Topics include public goods, public choice, income redistribution, benefit-cost analysis, health care, social security, and incidence and behavioral effects of taxation. Not open to students who have credit for Economics 3510 {310}.
ECON 2226. Political Economy of Pan-Americanism.
Examines programs for economic and political integration of the Americas from the early nineteenth century to the present. Surveys the material and ideological motives for Pan-Americanism from the Congress of Panama (1826) to the Organization of American States (1948), the draft of a Free Trade Area of the Americas (2001), and beyond. Different forms of integration are evaluated in light of historical consequences and economic ideas.
ECON 2227. Human Resources and Economic Development.
An analysis of human resource issues in the context of developing countries. Topics include the composition of the labor force by age and gender, productivity of the labor force, unemployment and informal sector employment, child labor and the health and schooling of children, and the effects of structural adjustment policies and other policy interventions on the development and utilization of human resources. Examples from selected African, Asian, and Latin American countries are integrated throughout and the interaction of sociocultural environments with economic forces is considered.
ECON 2301. Financial Economics.
Provides an overview of issues in the economics of finance. Explores how financial markets are used to manage risk and allocate scarce resources over time and space. Topics covered may include: bond pricing, time and risk preferences, the capital asset pricing model, the efficient markets hypothesis, anomalies and proposed explanations in asset pricing, the Modigliani-Miller theorem, and agency issues within firms. Presentation of material will be grounded in economic theory. Mathematics 1600 {161} is recommended.
ECON 2555A. Microeconomics.
An intermediate-level study of contemporary microeconomic theory. Analysis of the theory of resource allocation and distribution, with major emphasis on systems of markets and prices as a social mechanism for making resource allocation decisions. Topics include the theory of individual choice and demand, the theory of the firm, market equilibrium under competition and monopoly, general equilibrium theory, and welfare economics.
ECON 2555B. Microeconomics.
An intermediate-level study of contemporary microeconomic theory. Analysis of the theory of resource allocation and distribution, with major emphasis on systems of markets and prices as a social mechanism for making resource allocation decisions. Topics include the theory of individual choice and demand, the theory of the firm, market equilibrium under competition and monopoly, general equilibrium theory, and welfare economics.
ECON 2556. Macroeconomics.
An intermediate-level study of contemporary national income, employment, and inflation theory. Consumption, investment, government receipts, government expenditures, money, and interest rates are examined for their determinants, interrelationships, and role in determining the level of aggregate economic activity. Policy implications are drawn from the analysis.
ECON 2557. Economic Statistics.
An introduction to the data and statistical methods used in economics. A review of the systems that generate economic data and the accuracy of such data is followed by an examination of the statistical methods used in testing the hypotheses of economic theory, both micro- and macro-. Probability, random variables and their distributions, methods of estimating parameters, hypothesis testing, regression, and correlation are covered. The application of multiple regression to economic problems is stressed. Students who have taken Mathematics 2606 (265})are encouraged to take Economics 3516 (316) instead of this course.
ECON 3305. Game Theory and Strategic Behavior.
A rigorous introduction to mathematical game theory, the theory of strategic behavior. Topics include dominance, rationalizability, pure and mixed strategy Nash equilibrium, sequential and repeated games, subgame perfect equilibrium, bargaining, and games of incomplete information. Applications to business, politics, and sports will be discussed. Not open to students who have credit for Economics 2323.
ECON 3508. International Trade.
Seminar. Offers a theoretical and empirical analysis of international trade. Addresses the globalization debate; and the relation between trade, growth, and productivity. Particular attention is given to the standard models of trade: the Ricardian model, the Heckscher-Ohlin model, the specific factors model, the monopolistic competition model, and the model of heterogeneous firms and trade. Data analysis is used in order to evaluate the success or shortcomings of the theoretical models.
ECON 3516. Econometrics.
Seminar. A study of the mathematical formulation of economic models and the statistical methods of testing them. A detailed examination of the general linear regression model, its assumptions, and its extensions. Applications to both micro- and macroeconomics are considered. Though most of the course deals with single-equation models, an introduction to the estimation of systems of equations is included. An empirical research paper is required.
ECON 3518. Environmental and Natural Resource Economics.
Seminar. Analysis of externalities and market failure; models of optimum control of pollution and efficient management of renewable and nonrenewable natural resources such as fisheries, forests, and minerals; governmental vs. other forms of control of common-pool resources; and benefit-cost analysis of policies, including market-based and non-market valuation. Permission of instructor required during add/drop for students who have credit for Economics 2218 {218}