Location: Bowdoin / Economics / Courses / Fall 2009

Economics

Fall 2009

101. Principles of Microeconomics
Rachel Connelly T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25 Searles-223
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on the allocation of resources through markets. The theory of demand, supply, cost, and market structure is developed and then applied to problems in antitrust policy, environmental quality, energy, education, health, the role of the corporation in society, income distribution, and poverty. Students desiring a comprehensive introduction to economic reasoning should take both Economics 101 and 102.

101. Principles of Microeconomics
Bibi Khan T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55 Druckenmiller-004
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on the allocation of resources through markets. The theory of demand, supply, cost, and market structure is developed and then applied to problems in antitrust policy, environmental quality, energy, education, health, the role of the corporation in society, income distribution, and poverty. Students desiring a comprehensive introduction to economic reasoning should take both Economics 101 and 102.

101. Principles of Microeconomics
Joon-Suk Lee M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55 Searles-223
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on the allocation of resources through markets. The theory of demand, supply, cost, and market structure is developed and then applied to problems in antitrust policy, environmental quality, energy, education, health, the role of the corporation in society, income distribution, and poverty. Students desiring a comprehensive introduction to economic reasoning should take both Economics 101 and 102.

101. Principles of Microeconomics
Joon-Suk Lee M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55 Searles-223
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on the allocation of resources through markets. The theory of demand, supply, cost, and market structure is developed and then applied to problems in antitrust policy, environmental quality, energy, education, health, the role of the corporation in society, income distribution, and poverty. Students desiring a comprehensive introduction to economic reasoning should take both Economics 101 and 102.

101. Principles of Microeconomics
David Vail T 8:30 - 9:55, TH 8:30 - 9:55 Hubbard-Conference Room West
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on the allocation of resources through markets. The theory of demand, supply, cost, and market structure is developed and then applied to problems in antitrust policy, environmental quality, energy, education, health, the role of the corporation in society, income distribution, and poverty. Students desiring a comprehensive introduction to economic reasoning should take both Economics 101 and 102.

102. Principles of Macroeconomics
Jonathan Goldstein T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25 Searles-213
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on determinants of the level of national income, prices, and employment. Current problems of inflation and unemployment are explored with the aid of such analysis, and alternative views of the effectiveness of fiscal, monetary, and other governmental policies are analyzed. Attention is given to the sources and consequences of economic growth and to the nature and significance of international linkages through goods and capital markets.

102. Principles of Macroeconomics
Yao Tang T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25 Kanbar Hall-107
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on determinants of the level of national income, prices, and employment. Current problems of inflation and unemployment are explored with the aid of such analysis, and alternative views of the effectiveness of fiscal, monetary, and other governmental policies are analyzed. Attention is given to the sources and consequences of economic growth and to the nature and significance of international linkages through goods and capital markets.

226. Political Economy of Pan-Americanism
Stephen Meardon M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55 Sills-117
Examines programs for economic and political integration of the Americas from the early nineteenth century to the present. Surveys the material and ideological motives for Pan-Americanism from the Congress of Panama (1826) to the Organization of American States (1948), the draft of a Free Trade Area of the Americas (2001), and beyond. Different forms of integration are evaluated in light of historical consequences and economic ideas.

228. Natural Resource Economics and Policy
Guillermo Herrera T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25 Searles-223
A study of the economic issues surrounding the existence and use of renewable natural resources (e.g., forestry/land use, fisheries, water, ecosystems, and the effectiveness of antibiotics) and exhaustible resources (such as minerals, fossil fuels, and old growth forest). A basic framework is first developed for determining economically efficient use of resources over time, then extended to consider objectives other than efficiency, as well as the distinguishing biological, ecological, physical, political, and social attributes of each resource. Uncertainty, common property, and various regulatory instruments are discussed, as well as alternatives to government intervention and/or privatization.

255. Microeconomics
John Fitzgerald T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25 Searles-215
An intermediate-level study of contemporary microeconomic theory. Analysis of the theory of resource allocation and distribution, with major emphasis on systems of markets and prices as a social mechanism for making resource allocation decisions. Topics include the theory of individual choice and demand, the theory of the firm, market equilibrium under competition and monopoly, general equilibrium theory, and welfare economics.

255. Microeconomics
Guillermo Herrera T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25 Adams-406
An intermediate-level study of contemporary microeconomic theory. Analysis of the theory of resource allocation and distribution, with major emphasis on systems of markets and prices as a social mechanism for making resource allocation decisions. Topics include the theory of individual choice and demand, the theory of the firm, market equilibrium under competition and monopoly, general equilibrium theory, and welfare economics.

256. Macroeconomics
Paola Boel T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25 Druckenmiller-020
An intermediate-level study of contemporary national income, employment, and inflation theory. Consumption, investment, government receipts, government expenditures, money, and interest rates are examined for their determinants, interrelationships, and role in determining the level of aggregate economic activity. Policy implications are drawn from the analysis.

257. Economic Statistics
Rachel Connelly T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55 Searles-223
An introduction to the data and statistical methods used in economics. A review of the systems that generate economic data and the accuracy of such data is followed by an examination of the statistical methods used in testing the hypotheses of economic theory, both micro- and macro-. Probability, random variables and their distributions, methods of estimating parameters, hypothesis testing, regression, and correlation are covered. The application of multiple regression to economic problems is stressed. Students who have taken Mathematics 265 are encouraged to take Economics 316 instead of this course.

260. Finance I
Gregory DeCoster T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55 Searles-315
As the first in a two-course sequence (Finance I and II—Economics 260 and 360), provides a thorough exposure to the fundamental concepts involved in corporate financial decision-making, investment analysis, and portfolio management. In addition, presents the financial accounting principles and practices necessary to understand and utilize corporate financial statements as inputs to decision-making and valuation exercises. Topics include functions and structure of the financial system; overview of valuation—measures of return and risk, and discounted cash-flow analysis; sources of financial information—basic accounting concepts, balance sheet, income statement, statement of cash-flows, and financial ratios; portfolio theory, the capital asset pricing model, and efficient markets theory; corporate decision-making, the cost of capital, capital budgeting, and capital structure. Mathematics 161 is recommended.

310. Advanced Public Economics
John Fitzgerald T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25 Hubbard-22
Seminar. A survey of theoretical and empirical evaluations of government activities in the economy, considering both efficiency and equity aspects. Topics include public choice, income redistribution, benefit-cost analysis, analysis of selected government expenditure programs (including social security), incidence and behavioral effects of taxation, and tax reform. Current public policy issues are emphasized. Not open to students who have credit for Economics 210.

316. Econometrics
Jonathan Goldstein T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25 Hubbard-22
Seminar. A study of the mathematical formulation of economic models and the statistical methods of testing them. A detailed examination of the general linear regression model, its assumptions, and its extensions. Applications to both micro- and macroeconomics are considered. Though most of the course deals with single-equation models, an introduction to the estimation of systems of equations is included. An empirical research paper is required.

340. Law and Economics
Bibi Khan T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55 Sills-111
Seminar. Law and economics is one of the most rapidly growing areas in the social sciences. The field applies the concepts and empirical methods of economics to further our understanding of the legal system. Explores the economic analysis of law and legal institutions, including the economics of torts, contracts, property, crime, courts, and dispute resolution. Also focuses on topics in law and economics such as antitrust and regulation, corporations, the family, labor markets, product liability, and intellectual property. Students are introduced to online sources of information in law, and are required to apply economic reasoning to analyze landmark lawsuits in each of these areas. Not open to students who have credit for Economics 341.

356. Monetary Economics
Paola Boel T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55 Searles-223
Examines the role that money plays in market economies. Monetary policies, fiscal policies, and payment systems are studied. Particular attention is given to how inflation and taxes affect saving, investment, and output. The interaction of money with other assets, the banking system, forms of credit, and alternatives to fiat money are also investigated.