Calendar of Events

Economics Seminar: IKEA: Products, Pricing, and Pass-through

Economics Seminar: IKEA: Products, Pricing, and Pass-through

October 2, 2014 4:00 PM  – 5:15 PM
Hubbard Hall, Room 208 Thomas F. Shannon Room

Please join the Economics Department for a talk by Anthony Landry from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. 

Landry will be giving a paper entitled "IKEA: Products, Pricing, and Pass-through." With over 300 stores in 40 countries, IKEA is a major international presence in retail housewares and furnishings. IKEA publishes country-specific catalogs with local-currency prices guaranteed to hold for 1 year. This paper explores a new dataset of IKEA products and catalog prices covering six countries for the time period 1994-2010. The dataset, with over 140,000 observations, is uniquely poised to shed light on the way in which a large multinational retailer operates in a setting characterized by a very large number of goods, distributed and priced in many countries. Thus, the goal of this paper is to document the choices made by IKEA in several related decision areas. In doing so, this paper provides evidence against which existing theories can be evaluated and revised in the light of this new information.

Supported by The F. Thomas O'Halloran '77, P '13 Family Fund.

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Economics Seminar: Validating China's Output Data Using Satellite Observations

Economics Seminar: Validating China's Output Data Using Satellite Observations

October 23, 2014 4:00 PM  – 5:15 PM
Hubbard Hall, Room 208 Thomas F. Shannon Room

Join us for a talk by Bowdoin's own Stephen Morris as he presents "Validating China's output data using satellite observations," co-authored by Junjie Zhang (UCSD, School of International Relations and Pacific Studies) and Qiang Zhang (Tsinghua University, Center for Earth Systems Science).

Chinese statistical data has long been cast under suspicion. In particular, due to the incentives of provincial officials for career advancement, it is presumed that output is overreported. In this paper, we motivate using scientific data collected by international satellites -- including nighttime luminosity and nitrogen oxides -- for the purposes of computing proxies for economic growth in China. We use our newly computed measures to test the hypothesis that output was systematically overreported by individual provinces during the recent downturn of 2008-9.

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John Fitzgerald presents: "Does Public Assistance Improve Long Run Outcomes for Children? Avoiding Spurious Correlations"

John Fitzgerald presents: "Does Public Assistance Improve Long Run Outcomes for Children? Avoiding Spurious Correlations"

October 29, 2014 12:00 PM  – 1:00 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

FACULTY SEMINAR SERIES

John M. Fitzgerald
, William D. Shipman Professor of Economics is the featured speaker.  The title of his talk is: "Does Public Assistance Improve Long Run Outcomes for Children? Avoiding Spurious Correlations"

Open to faculty and staff.
Buffet lunch $3, or bring your own lunch.

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Economics Seminar: Getting the dirt: how soil variability limits social learning in rural Kenya

Economics Seminar: Getting the dirt: how soil variability limits social learning in rural Kenya

November 4, 2014 4:00 PM  – 5:15 PM
Hubbard Hall, Room 208 Thomas F. Shannon Room

Emilia Tjernstrom is a PhD candidate at UC Davis and will present her paper, "Getting the dirt: how soil variability limits social learning in rural Kenya."  This paper studies how networks affect knowledge about and adoption of a new agricultural technology in rural Kenya. Taking advantage of experimental variation in the information available to farmers through their social networks, we find that social learning is taking place and that it affects farmers' familiarity with the new technology as well as their likelihood of adopting the new technology. We also examine how variability in soil quality within villages influences social networks and provide evidence that greater differences in soils makes farmers less likely to respond to their peers' experiences. This finding suggests that in a region characterized by substantial environmental heterogeneity, but where country-level input recommendations are the norm, policy-makers may do well to provide more localized agricultural guidance, thereby reducing the complexity facing farmers in the learning process.


Supported by The F. Thomas O'Halloran '77, P '13 Family Fund.

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Economics Seminar: Apologies: Theory, Empirics and Experiments

Economics Seminar: Apologies: Theory, Empirics and Experiments

November 21, 2014 4:00 PM  – 5:15 PM
Hubbard Hall, Room 208 Thomas F. Shannon Room

Join us for a talk by Benjamin Ho, Assistant Professor of Economics at Vassar College. Ho is a behavioral economist who uses economic tools like game theory and experiments to understand social systems such as apologies, identity signaling, and climate concerns. He will present his paper Apologies: Theory, Empirics and Experiments.

Apologies are a social institution integral for the maintenance of relationships in areas ranging from politics, corporate culture, or in daily life. I present a principal-agent model where apologies serve as signals of match quality, and use the model to study the role of apologies in both lab experiments: as related to the trust game and to the dictator game; and in the real world, through a study of the impact of apology laws on medical malpractice, and a field experiment on repeated apologies by an online phone card vendor.

Supported by The F. Thomas O'Halloran '77, P '13 Family Fund.

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Erik Nelson presents: "Measuring the Opportunity Cost of Critical Habitat Designation under the U.S. Endangered Species Act"

Erik Nelson presents: "Measuring the Opportunity Cost of Critical Habitat Designation under the U.S. Endangered Species Act"

December 3, 2014 12:00 PM  – 1:00 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

FACULTY SEMINAR SERIES

Erik Nelson
, Assistant Professor of Economics is the featured speaker.  The title of his talk is: "Measuring the Opportunity Cost of Critical Habitat Designation under the U.S. Endangered Species Act."

Open to faculty and staff.
Buffet lunch $3, or bring your own lunch.

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