Calendar of Events

Careers in the Locavore Economy

Careers in the Locavore Economy

September 25, 2014 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

There is more to the locavore movement than farmer's markets on the green! Maine is an incubator of entrepreneurial opportunities connected to the food economy, and Bowdoin alumni are playing an active role in its success. Come learn about their work, challenges and areas of growth. Panelists include representatives from the fishing industry, craft beer movement, international tea import start-up, and the role that foundations are playing in supporting local food initiatives. Refreshments will follow.

This will be a moderated discussion with plenty of time for questions and informal conversation over refreshments.The panelists are:

Jay Espy, '79 executive director of the Elmina B. Sewall Foundation. Based in Brunswick, the foundation focuses on the environment, animal welfare, and human well-being, primarily in Maine.

Before joining the Sewall Foundation, Espy served as president of Maine Coast Heritage Trust, a statewide land conservation organization. During his tenure, the Trust accelerated its land protection efforts along Maine's entire coast by conserving more than 125,000 acres and establishing the Maine Land Trust Network, which helps build capacity of local land trusts throughout Maine. Jay has an A.B. in Economics from Bowdoin and master's degrees in business and environmental studies from Yale's School of Management and its School of Forestry and Environmental Studies.

Sara Holby, '08 founder Ajiri Tea, Kenya

After graduating from Bowdoin College in May 2008, Sara Holby headed to Kisii, in western Kenya, to volunteer for a health-related non-governmental organization (NGO). When funding ran short for the NGO Sara worked with local women (and her sister and Mom), to found Ajiri tea, a non-profit that directly benefits local women, farmers and aids orphans. Ajiri Tea also supports Ajiri Foundation which together form a sustainable trade cycle to educate orphans in Western Kenya. Sarah was an ES/History major, who went to Kenya after graduation with a Global Citizen Grant from Bowdoin's McKeen Center. In her senior year, Sara was a co-president of the Outing Club.

Sean Sullivan, '08, executive director, Maine Brewers' Guild, and Co-founder, Buoy Local

The Maine Brewers' Guild is a nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting and protecting the craft beer industry in Maine. The guild's mission is to keep Maine in the forefront of the craft beer revolution by offering high quality and creative diversity for the customer. Buoy Local is a community-minded technology company based in Portland, ME with a mission to help consumers spend locally and grow greater Portland's economy. The company offers a single, community-based, 'open loop' gift card that enables consumers to buy locally from their favorite independent stores and businesses in the Portland region. Sean was an Art History major at Bowdoin.

Lucy Van Hook, '06 Fisheries Program Coordinator, Maine Coast Fishermen's Association

Lucy Van Hook is the Fisheries Program Coordinator at the Maine Coast Fishermen's Association and provides support to the groundfish sector as the Sector Data Analyst. She works on projects that focus on sustaining the inshore groundfish fishermen of Maine. Projects include building a greater constituency and increasing fishermen engagement, fishing gear and monitoring research, business planning for fishermen and expanding communication and outreach efforts to build a strong foundation for the organization.

Though Lucy's fishing experience is limited to trolling for mackeral, she grew up spending time in Penobscot Bay and has spent the last ten years living in Mid-coast Maine. She graduated from Bowdoin College with a focus in biology and environmental studies and spent several years conducting field-based research in a fresh water ecosystem. Most recently, she earned her masters degree in climate science policy with a strong emphasis on interdisciplinary, sustainable approaches to building policy.

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Economics Seminar: IKEA: Products, Pricing, and Pass-through

Economics Seminar: IKEA: Products, Pricing, and Pass-through

October 2, 2014 4:00 PM  – 5:15 PM
Hubbard Hall, Room 208 Thomas F. Shannon Room

Please join the Economics Department for a talk by Anthony Landry from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. 

Landry will be giving a paper entitled "IKEA: Products, Pricing, and Pass-through."  With over 300 stores in 40 countries, IKEA is a major international presence in retail housewares and furnishings. IKEA publishes country-specific catalogs with local-currency prices guaranteed to hold for 1 year. This paper explores a new dataset of IKEA products and catalog prices covering six countries for the time period 1994-2010. The dataset, with over 140,000 observations, is uniquely poised to shed light on the way in which a large multinational retailer operates in a setting characterized by a very large number of goods, distributed and priced in many countries. Thus, the goal of this paper is to document the choices made by IKEA in several related decision areas. In doing so, this paper provides evidence against which existing theories can be evaluated and revised in the light of this new information.

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Economics Seminar: Apologies: Theory, Empirics and Experiments

Economics Seminar: Apologies: Theory, Empirics and Experiments

November 21, 2014 4:00 PM  – 5:15 PM
Hubbard Hall, Room 208 Thomas F. Shannon Room

Join us for a talk by Benjamin Ho, Assistant Professor of Economics at Vassar College. Ho is a behavioral economist who uses economic tools like game theory and experiments to understand social systems such as apologies, identity signaling, and climate concerns.

He will present his paper "Apologies: Theory, Empirics and Experiments."

Apologies are a social institution integral for the maintenance of relationships in areas ranging from politics, corporate culture, or in daily life. I present a principal-agent model where apologies serve as signals of match quality, and use the model to study the role of apologies in both lab experiments: as related to the trust game and to the dictator game; and in the real world, through a study of the impact of apology laws on medical malpractice, and a field experiment on repeated apologies by an online phone card vendor.

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