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Classics

Requirements

The Department of Classics offers three major programs: one with a focus on language and literature (Classics), one with a focus on classical archaeology (Classical Archaeology), and one that looks at the ancient world from varied perspectives (Classical Studies). Students pursuing these majors are encouraged to study not only the languages and literatures but also the physical monuments of Greece and Rome. This approach is reflected in the requirements for the three major programs: for all, requirements in Greek and/or Latin and in classical culture must be fulfilled.

Classics

The classics program is arranged to accommodate both those students who have studied no classical languages and those who have had extensive training in Latin and Greek. The objective of classics courses is to study the ancient languages and literatures in the original. By their very nature, these courses involve students in the politics, history, and philosophies of antiquity. Advanced language courses focus on the analysis of textual material and on literary criticism.

Requirements for the Major in Classics

The major in classics consists of ten courses. At least six of the ten courses are to be chosen from offerings in Greek and Latin and should include at least two courses in Greek or Latin at the 300 level.  Of the remaining courses, one should be chosen from Archaeology 101 or 102, one should be chosen from Classics 101 or 102, and one should be chosen from Classics 211 or 212.  Of the courses a student wishes to count towards the major, at least one at the 300 level should be taken during the senior year.  Students concentrating in one of the languages are encouraged to take at least two courses in the other.  As a capstone to this major, a research seminar taken in the junior or senior year is required; a research seminar is one in which a substantial research project is undertaken and successfully completed.  Courses are so designated in the course descriptions.


Classical Archaeology

Within the broader context of classical studies, the classical archaeology program pays special attention to the physical remains of classical antiquity. Students studying classical archaeology should develop an understanding of how archaeological evidence can contribute to our knowledge of the past, and of how archaeological study interacts with such related disciplines as philology, history, and art history. In particular, they should acquire an appreciation for the unique balance of written and physical sources that makes classical archaeology a central part of classical studies.

Requirements for the Major in Classical Archaeology

The major in classical archaeology consists of ten courses. At least five of the ten courses are to be chosen from offerings in archaeology, and should include Archaeology 101, 102, and at least one archaeology course at the 300 level. At least four of the remaining courses are to be chosen from offerings in Greek or Latin, and should include at least one at the 300 level. As a capstone to this major, a research seminar is required.


Classical Studies

The Classical Studies major provides a useful foundation for students who seek a multi-disciplinary view of the ancient. The major enfolds coursework in an ancient language (Greek or Latin) with classes that explore the culture, history, and traditions of the ancient Mediterranean.

Requirements for the Major in Classical Studies

The major in classical studies consists of ten courses. At least eight courses must be selected from within the department. A minimum of two classes should be elected in a single ancient language (Greek or Latin). The appropriate level depends on the student’s preparation and is determined by the department. The remaining classes should include: Classics 101, 102, 211, and 212; at least one course in Classical Archaeology; at least one and not more than two classes outside the department of Classics and chosen from the following (or from other appropriate offerings in these disciplines, with classics department approval): Anthropology 102 or 221; Art History 213 or 215; Government 240; Philosophy 111; Religion 106, 215, or 216; English/Theater 106; and at least two advanced courses in the department at the 300 level, one of which must be a designated research seminar.  As a capstone to this major, a research seminar taken in the junior or senior year is required; a research seminar is one in which a substantial research project is undertaken and successfully completed.  Courses are so designated in the course descriptions.


Interdisciplinary Major

The department participates in an interdisciplinary program in archaeology and art history.  A student wishing to pursue one of these majors needs the approval of the departments concerned.

Art History and Archaeology Requirements

  • Art History 101; one of Art History 212, 213, 214 or 215; Art  History 222; and one of Art History 302 through 388; Archaeology 101 (same as Art History 209), 102 (same as Art History 210) and any three additional archaeology courses, at least one of which must be at the 300 level.
  • Any two art history courses numbered 10 through 388.
  • One of the following:  Classics 101, 211 (same as History 201), 212 (same as History 202), or 291 (Independent Study in Ancient History); Philosophy 111; or an appropriate course in religion at the 200 level.
  • Either Art History 401 or Archaeology 401.

Requirements for the Minor

Students may choose a minor in one of five areas:

  1. Greek: Five courses in the department, including at least four in the Greek language;
  2. Latin: Five courses in the department, including at least four in the Latin language;
  3. Classics: Five courses in the department, including at least four in the classical languages; of these four, one should be either Greek 204 or Latin 205 or 206;
  4. Archaeology: Six courses in the department, including either Archaeology 101 or 102, one archaeology course at the 300 level, and two other archaeology courses;
  5. Classical Studies (Greek or Roman): Six courses, including:
    • for the Greek studies concentration:
      • two courses in the Greek language;
      • Archaeology 101;
      • one of the following: Classics 17 (or any other appropriate first-year seminar), Classics 101, 102, or 211; or Philosophy 111; or Government 240;
      • and two of the following: Archaeology 203 or any 300-level archaeology course focusing primarily on Greek material; Classics 291–294 (Independent Study) or any 200- or 300-level Greek or classics course focusing primarily on Greek material.
    • for the Roman studies concentration:
      • two courses in the Latin language;
      • Archaeology 102;
      • one of the following: Classics 16 (or any other appropriate first-year seminar), Classics 101, 102, or 212; or Philosophy 111; or Government 240;
      • and two of the following: Archaeology 204 or any 300-level archaeology course focusing primarily on Roman material; or Classics 291–294 (Independent Study) or any 200- or 300-level Latin or classics course focusing primarily on Roman material.

Other courses in the Bowdoin curriculum may be applied to this minor if approved by the Classics Department.