Spring 2013 Courses

102. Introduction to Ancient Greek Culture
Cassandra Borges M 11:30 - 12:25, W 11:30 - 12:25, F 11:30 - 12:25 VAC-Beam Classroom
Introduces students to the study of the literature and culture of ancient Greece. Examines different Greek responses to issues such as religion and the role of gods in human existence, heroism, the natural world, the individual and society, and competition. Considers forms of Greek rationalism, the flourishing of various literary and artistic media, Greek experimentation with different political systems, and concepts of Hellenism and barbarism. Investigates not only what we do and do not know about ancient Greece, but also the types of evidence and methodologies with which we construct this knowledge. Evidence is drawn primarily from the works of authors such as Homer, Sappho, Herodotus, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Thucydides, Aristophanes, Plato, and Hippocrates, but attention is also given to documentary and artistic sources. All readings are done in translation.
214. The Republic of Rome and the Evolution of Executive Power
Michael Nerdahl M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55 Adams-208
Examines in depth the approaches to leadership within the governmental system that enabled a small, Italian city-state to take eventual control of the Mediterranean world, and how this state was affected by its unprecedented military, economic, and territorial growth. Investigates and re-imagines the political maneuverings of the most famous pre-Imperial Romans, such as Scipio Africanus, the Gracchi, and Cicero, and how political institutions such as the Roman Senate and assemblies reacted to and dealt with military, economic, and revolutionary crises. Looks at the relationship of the Roman state to class warfare, the nature of electoral politics, and the power of precedent and tradition. While examining if the ultimate fall precipitated by Caesar's ambition and vision was inevitable, we will also discover what lessons, if any, modern politicians can learn about statesmanship from the transformation of the hyper-competitive atmosphere of the Republic into the monarchical principate of Augustus. All sources, such as Livy's history of Rome, Plutarch's Lives, letters and speeches of Cicero, and Caesar's Civil War, are in English, and no prior knowledge of Roman antiquity is required. Note: This course fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors.
232. Ancient Greek Theater
Jennifer Kosak T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55 Sills-109
Examines the development and character of tragedy and comedy in ancient Greece. Topics include the dramatic festivals of Athens, the nature of Greek theaters and theatrical production; the structure and style of tragic and comic plays; tragic and comic heroism; gender, religion and myth in drama; the relationship of tragedy and comedy to the political and social dynamics of ancient Athens. Some attention will be paid to the theory of tragedy and to the legacy of Greek drama. Authors include Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes. Includes a performance component.
309. Before Homer: Mycenaean Greek Society
Cynthia Shelmerdine T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55 Chase Barn Chamber
Mycenaean Greece (1600-1200 B.C.) provides the inspiration for many Greek myths and for the Homeric epics. Looks at the realities behind those stories. Mycenaean palaces, tombs, and a few town sites have been excavated. We also have administrative records from the palaces that shed light on Mycenaean religion, economy, and society. By putting together the archaeological and textual evidence we can begin to understand this earliest period of Greek history. Offers a good understanding of what we know about Mycenaean Greece, as well as the nature of the evidence and some problems in using it. Also compares real Mycenaean history with the mythological versions. Student research projects can be tailored to individual interest and background. Research seminar.

Greek

101. Elementary Greek I
Jennifer Kosak M 9:30 - 10:25, W 9:30 - 10:25, F 9:30 - 10:25 Sills-117
Introduces students to basic elements of ancient Greek grammar and syntax; emphasizes the development of reading proficiency and includes readings, both adapted and in the original, of various Greek authors. Focuses on Attic dialect.
203. Intermediate Greek for Reading
Robert Sobak M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25 The Hazelton Room (Kanbar 109)
A review of the essentials of Greek grammar and syntax and an introduction to the reading of Greek prose through the study of one of Plato's dialogues. Equivalent of Greek 102 or two to three years of high school Greek is required.
303. The Historians
Robert Sobak W 7:00 - 10:25 The Hazelton Room (Kanbar 109)
Focuses on the histories of Herodotus or Thucydides. Course may be repeated for credit if the contents change. Research seminar.

Latin

102. Elementary Latin II
Michael Nerdahl M 9:30 - 10:25, W 9:30 - 10:25, F 9:30 - 10:25 Searles-113
A continuation of Latin 101. During this term, readings are based on unaltered passages of classical Latin.
204. Studies in Latin Literature
Barbara Boyd T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25 Sills-209
An introduction to different genres and themes in Latin literature. The subject matter and authors covered may change from year to year (e.g., selections from Virgil's Aeneid and Livy's History, or from Lucretius, Ovid, and Cicero), but attention is always given to the historical and literary context of the authors read. While the primary focus is on reading Latin texts, some readings from Latin literature in translation are also assigned. Equivalent of Latin 203 or three to four years of high school Latin is required.
315. The Swerve: Lucretius' De rerum natura
Barbara Boyd T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25 Sills-209
T. Lucretius Carus (c. 94-55 B.C.E.) is the author of a poem "on the nature of things," composed in six books of didactic-epic hexameters. A student of Epicurean philosophy, Lucretius adapts both the beliefs and proto-scientific discoveries of one of classical antiquity's most influential intellectual traditions to Latin poetry; his poem proves a model both for subsequent classical poets and for the rationalist movements of the Renaissance. In this research seminar, we read major selections from the poem in Latin, and the entire work in English, and consider recent scholarly approaches to Lucretius's work; several weeks at the end of the semester devoted to Lucretius's post-classical influence and reception. Research seminar.

Archaeology

309. Before Homer: Mycenaean Greek Society
Cynthia Shelmerdine T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55 Chase Barn Chamber
Mycenaean Greece (1600-1200 B.C.) provides the inspiration for many Greek myths and for the Homeric epics. Looks at the realities behind those stories. Mycenaean palaces, tombs, and a few town sites have been excavated. We also have administrative records from the palaces that shed light on Mycenaean religion, economy, and society. By putting together the archaeological and textual evidence we can begin to understand this earliest period of Greek history. Offers a good understanding of what we know about Mycenaean Greece, as well as the nature of the evidence and some problems in using it. Also compares real Mycenaean history with the mythological versions. Student research projects can be tailored to individual interest and background. Research seminar.