Spring 2011 Courses

Archaeology

202. Augustan Rome
Barbara Boyd M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55 Sills-109
Upon his ascent to power after a century of war, Rome’s first princeps, Augustus, launched a program of cultural reformation and restoration that was to have a profound and enduring effect upon every aspect of life in the empire, from fashions in entertainment, decoration, and art, to religious and political habits and customs. Using the city of Rome as its primary text, investigates how the Augustan “renovation” of Rome is manifested first and foremost in the monuments associated with the ruler: the Mausoleum of Augustus, theater of Marcellus, temple of Apollo on the Palatine, Altar of Augustan Peace, and Forum of Augustus, as well as many others. Understanding of the material remains themselves is supplemented by historical and literary texts dating to Augustus’s reign, as well as by a consideration of contemporary research and controversies in the field.
308. The Fall of Rome?
Ryan Ricciardi T 1:00 - 3:55 Chase Barn Chamber
Examines the transformation of the ancient world from the third-century crisis of the Roman Empire to the rise of Islamic civilization. Explores political, cultural, and social changes that transformed the political and religious culture of the Mediterranean world between the third and the eighth centuries C.E. Challenges traditional understanding of the end of the Roman Empire through primary sources including architecture, sculpture, and texts.

Classical Studies

102. Introduction to Ancient Greek Culture
Jennifer Kosak M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25 Sills-117
Introduces students to the study of the literature and culture of ancient Greece. Examines different Greek responses to issues such as religion and the role of gods in human existence, heroism, the natural world, the individual and society, and competition. Considers forms of Greek rationalism, the flourishing of various literary and artistic media, Greek experimentation with different political systems, and concepts of Hellenism and barbarism. Investigates not only what we do and do not know about ancient Greece, but also the types of evidence and methodologies with which we construct this knowledge. Evidence is drawn primarily from the works of authors such as Homer, Sappho, Herodotus, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Thucydides, Aristophanes, Plato, and Hippocrates, but attention is also given to documentary and artistic sources. All readings are done in translation.
202. Augustan Rome
Barbara Boyd M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55 Sills-109
Upon his ascent to power after a century of war, Rome’s first princeps, Augustus, launched a program of cultural reformation and restoration that was to have a profound and enduring effect upon every aspect of life in the empire, from fashions in entertainment, decoration, and art, to religious and political habits and customs. Using the city of Rome as its primary text, investigates how the Augustan “renovation” of Rome is manifested first and foremost in the monuments associated with the ruler: the Mausoleum of Augustus, theater of Marcellus, temple of Apollo on the Palatine, Altar of Augustan Peace, and Forum of Augustus, as well as many others. Understanding of the material remains themselves is supplemented by historical and literary texts dating to Augustus’s reign, as well as by a consideration of contemporary research and controversies in the field.
225. Immorality and Political Revolution in Ancient Rome
Michael Nerdahl M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55 Adams-208
Ancient historians of Rome felt that an odd and retrospectively predictable malaise infected the Roman Republic after the great victory over Hannibal and the forces of Carthage. Commonly, the historians relate a growing immorality stemming from a continued distancing from the traditional form of “Roman-ness.” This corrupting immorality is used to explain the process through which the stolid Roman Republic collapses through Civil War and eventually transforms into a monarchy. Examines in detail the historical-literary context of these post-Punic War years. Analyzes both the narrative of Rome’s transition from Republic to Principate and the events themselves to reveal what connection, if any, there is between how the ancients saw the Republic decline and the actual historical causes, and what lessons can be applied to the crises of the modern world, and America in particular.

Greek

101. Elementary Greek I
Barbara Boyd M 9:30 - 10:25, W 9:30 - 10:25, F 9:30 - 10:25 Sills-109
Introduces students to basic elements of ancient Greek grammar and syntax; emphasizes the development of reading proficiency and includes readings, both adapted and in the original, of various Greek authors. Focuses on Attic dialect.
204. Homer
Jennifer Kosak M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25 Sills-111
An introduction to the poetry of Homer. Focuses both on reading and on interpreting Homeric epic.

Latin

102. Elementary Latin II
Ryan Ricciardi M 9:30 - 10:25, W 9:30 - 10:25, F 9:30 - 10:25 Searles-115
A continuation of Latin 101. During this term, readings are based on unaltered passages of classical Latin.
204. Studies in Latin Literature
Michael Nerdahl M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25 Sills-209
An introduction to different genres and themes in Latin literature. The subject matter and authors covered may change from year to year (e.g., selections from Virgil’s Aeneid and Livy’s History, or from Lucretius, Ovid, and Cicero), but attention is always given to the historical and literary context of the authors read. While the primary focus is on reading Latin texts, some readings from Latin literature in translation are also assigned. Equivalent of Latin 203 or three to four years of high school Latin is required.
314. Roman Biography
Michael Nerdahl T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55 Sills-209
Tacitus and Suetonius were the preeminent Roman biographers writing under the Principate. Whereas Tacitus was a senator who bitterly laments the limits and censoriousness of the Empire in comparison to the freedoms prevalent under the old Roman Republic, Suetonius was primarily a man of letters, eventually becoming an imperial secretary whose views on contemporary politics are perhaps less easily inferred. Each man employs the genre of biography in a unique way: Tacitus writes an encomiastic and reflective work on his father-in-law, Agricola, whereas Suetonius focusing more dogmatically on the events, personality, and minutiae of the lives of the first twelve emperors of Rome. Close readings of Tacitus’ Agricola and at least one of Suetonius’ Lives of the Caesars, complemented by modern studies in genre, historical context and literary criticism; this seminar counts as a research seminar.