Fall 2013 Courses

  • Please note that for the 2013-14 academic year, official course numbers are now four digits. This page only shows the older three-digit course numbers. If you need to see both the old and the new numbers, consult the College Catalogue.
  • The College Catalogue has a class finder tool to search for courses by title, instructor, department, and more.
  • Login to Blackboard. Instructional materials are available on a course-by-course basis.

Archeology

101. Introduction to Greek Art and Archaeology
James Higginbotham T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25
Introduces the techniques and methods of classical archaeology as revealed through an examination of Greek material culture. Emphasis upon the major monuments and artifacts of the Greek world from prehistory to the Hellenistic age. Architecture, sculpture, fresco painting, and other ìminor artsî are examined at such sites as Knossos, Mycenae, Athens, Delphi, and Olympia. Considers the nature of this archaeological evidence and the relationship of classical archaeology to other disciplines such as art history, history, and classics. Assigned reading supplements illustrated presentations of the major archaeological finds of the Greek world.
207. Who Owns the Past? The Roles of Museums in Preserving and Presenting Culture
Susan Kaplan T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25
Examines the storied place of museums in the acquisition, preservation, and display of cultural heritage. The past practices of museums are studied with an eye to how they inform present policies. Aims to examine museumsí responses when confronting national and ethnic claims to items in museumsí permanent collections; the ethical choices involved in deciding what should be exhibited; the impact of politics, conflicts, and war on museum practices; and the alliances between museums, archaeologists, art historians, and anthropologists. Students benefit from conversations with a number of Bowdoin faculty and staff, as well as a series of guest speakers from other organizations. Selected readings and class discussion are augmented by visits to the collegeís two museums and other local museums.

Classics

011. Shame, Honor, and Responsibility
Jennifer Kosak T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
Examines Greek and Roman notions of responsibility to family, state, and self, and the social ideals and pressures that shaped ancient attitudes towards duty, shame, and honor. Readings may include works by Homer, Sophocles, Euripides, Virgil, Ovid, and Petronius.
211. History of Ancient Greece: Bronze Age to the Death of Alexander
Robert Sobak M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55
Surveys the history of Greek-speaking peoples from the Bronze Age (c. 3000ñ1100 B.C.E.) to the death of Alexander the Great in 323 B.C.E. Traces the political, economic, social, religious, and cultural developments of the Greeks in the broader context of the Mediterranean world. Topics include the institution of the polis (city-state); hoplite warfare; Greek colonization; the origins of Greek ìscience,î philosophy, and rhetoric; and fifth-century Athenian democracy and imperialism. Necessarily focuses on Athens and Sparta, but attention is also given to the variety of social and political structures found in different Greek communities. Special attention is given to examining and attempting to understand the distinctively Greek outlook in regard to gender, the relationship between human and divine, freedom, and the divisions between Greeks and barbarians (non-Greeks). A variety of sourcesóliterary, epigraphical, archaeologicalóare presented, and students learn how to use them as historical documents. Note: This course fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors.
310. Imagining Rome
Barbara Boyd M 6:30 - 9:25
The mythical fate-driven foundation of Rome and the cityís subsequent self-fashioning as caput mundi (ìcapital of the worldî) have made the city an idea that transcends history, and that has for millennia drawn historians, poets, artists, and, most recently, filmmakers to attempt to capture Romeís essence. As a result, the city defined by its ruins is continually created anew; this synergy between the ruins of Romeótogether with the mutability of empire that they representóand the cityís incessant rebirth through the lives of those who visit and inhabit it offers a model for understanding the changing reception of the classical past. This research seminar explores the cycle of ancient Romeís life and afterlife in the works of writers and filmmakers such as Livy, Virgil, Tacitus, Juvenal, Petrarch, Shakespeare, Keats, Goethe, Gibbon, Hawthorne, Freud, Moravia, Rossellini, Fellini, Bertolucci, and Moretti. All readings are in English.

Greek

102. Elementary Greek II
Jennifer Kosak M 9:30 - 10:25, W 9:30 - 10:25, F 9:30 - 10:25
A continuation of Greek 1101 {101}; introduces students to more complex grammar and syntax, while emphasizing the development of reading proficiency. Includes readings, both adapted and in the original, of Greek authors such as Plato and Euripides. Focuses on Attic dialect.
102. Elementary Greek II
Jennifer Kosak M 11:30 - 12:25, W 11:30 - 12:25, F 11:30 - 12:25
A continuation of Greek 1101 {101}; introduces students to more complex grammar and syntax, while emphasizing the development of reading proficiency. Includes readings, both adapted and in the original, of Greek authors such as Plato and Euripides. Focuses on Attic dialect.
204. Homer
Barbara Boyd M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25
An introduction to the poetry of Homer. Focuses both on reading and on interpreting Homeric epic.

Latin

101. Elementary Latin I
Michael Nerdahl M 9:30 - 10:25, W 9:30 - 10:25, F 9:30 - 10:25
A thorough presentation of the elements of Latin grammar. Emphasis is placed on achieving a reading proficiency.
101. Elementary Latin I
Michael Nerdahl M 11:30 - 12:25, W 11:30 - 12:25, F 11:30 - 12:25
A thorough presentation of the elements of Latin grammar. Emphasis is placed on achieving a reading proficiency.
203. Intermediate Latin for Reading
Robert Sobak M 11:30 - 12:25, W 11:30 - 12:25, F 11:30 - 12:25
A review of the essentials of Latin grammar and syntax and an introduction to the reading of Latin prose and poetry. Materials to be read change from year to year, but always include a major prose work. Equivalent of Latin 1102 {102} or two to three years of high school Latin is required.
304. Cicero
Michael Nerdahl M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25
Marcus Tullius Cicero (103-43 BC) lived through a period of great social, political, and cultural upheaval, and through his prolific writings left us a detailed if subjective record of what he did, saw, and experienced. He did so, furthermore, with styleóthat is, he wrote in a Latin style of such remarkable purity and elegance that he has set the standard not only for scholars through the centuries who have studied Latin style but also for many writers of prose of all sortsórhetorical, philosophical, historicalóthroughout the course of Western intellectual history. The course involves reading selections from Ciceroís corpus that can give us some sense of the world in which he lived and the Roman identity he helped to shape, and to acquire an appreciation for Latin prose (as well as some new techniques for reading it) as Cicero created it through translation, composition, and oratorical performance.