Calendar of Events

Laura McClure: "Women and Theater in Classical Athens"

Laura McClure: "Women and Theater in Classical Athens"

October 1, 2014 7:30 PM  – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Laura McClure is Jane Ellen Harrison Professor of Classics at the University of Wisconsin.  Professor McClure received her Ph.D. in Classical Languages and Literatures from the University of Chicago in 1991. Her research interests include Athenian drama, the study of women in the ancient world, and classical reception. Her books focus on representations of women in Athenian drama: Spoken Like a Woman: Speech and Gender in Athenian Drama (Princeton, 1999) and Courtesans at Table: Gender and Greek Literary Culture in Athenaeus (Routledge 2003). She has edited three volumes on the subject of women in antiquity, including Making Silence Speak: Women's Voices in Greek Literature and Society, with Andre Lardinois (Princeton, 2001), Prostitutes and Courtesans in the Ancient World, with C. A. Faraone (Wisconsin, 2006), and Sexuality and Gender in the Classical World (Blackwell, 2008). She has published numerous articles, most recently an analysis of the role of women in tragic recognition scenes. She is currently completing a textbook about women in ancient Greece and Rome (under contract with Blackwell). While on research leave in 2014-15, she plans to work on a new project on women and memory in Greek tragedy. She regularly teaches advanced Greek language courses, Women and Gender in the Classical World, Civilization of Ancient Greece, and Ancient Drama in translation.


Sponsored by the Mellon Humanities Initiative--Studies in the Mediterranean, the Jasper Jacob Stahl Lectureship Fund, and the Department of Classics.

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Film: The Secret of the Grain

Film: The Secret of the Grain

October 15, 2014 7:30 PM  – 10:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

The Secret of the Grain (French: La graine et le mulet, also released internationally as Couscous) is a 2007 Franco-Tunisian drama film directed by Abdellatif Kechiche. The film stars Habib Boufares as an aging immigrant from the Maghreb whose ambition to establish a successful restaurant as an inheritance for his large and disparate family meets skeptical opposition from the French bureaucracy. 

The screening is organized in conjunction with the upcoming exhibition Revealing Mediterranean Women at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art, and other activities around the topic of gender and sexualities in the Mediterranean. 

It will be followed by a conversation with Hanétha Vété- Congolo (French) Russell Hopley (Arabic) and Amina Ben Ismail (17’). 

Open to the public free of charge. For more information call 207-725-3782. Sponsored by the Mellon Initiative in Mediterranean Studies.

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Jeri DeBrohun, "Love's Allusions: Elegy and Intertextuality"

Jeri DeBrohun, "Love's Allusions: Elegy and Intertextuality"

October 16, 2014 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

Jeri DeBrohun is associate professor of classics at Brown University. An expert on gender in Latin poetry, her lecture on Roman elegiac love poetry will be of interest to students in Classics and other disciplines such as English and Romance Languages.

Sponsored by the Jasper Jacob Stahl Lectureship Fund and the Classics Department.

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Seth Schein: "'War, What is it Good For?' in Homer's Iliad and Four Receptions"

Seth Schein: "'War, What is it Good For?' in Homer's Iliad and Four Receptions"

October 20, 2014 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Seth Schein is Emeritus Professor of Comparative Literature at the University of California, Davis.  A leading scholar of Homer, his lecture will explore not only the topic of war in the Iliad but also the influence of Homer's poetry on twentieth-century poetry and music.  He will touch on artistic responses to war in both antiquity and the present day.  

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Brett Rogers: Tyrannical Teachers and Student-Citizens

Brett Rogers: Tyrannical Teachers and Student-Citizens

October 21, 2014 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Professor Brett Rogers, University of Puget Sound, WA, will be joining the many conversations and debates we are having about the "usefulness" of a liberal arts education with his public lecture, "Tyrannical Teachers and Student-Citizens: Classical Greek Perspectives on Freedom and the Liberal Arts." This talk starts with a curious question that arises in classical Greek tragedy – Why do tyrants talk like teachers? – and explores the social and political implications of ‘teaching’ in fifth century BCE Athens. One significant problem that arises from this exploration is whether students can actually be ‘free’, and thus calls into question some of the premises that underlie not only the foundations for the liberal arts (‘the skills possessed by a free person’) in Plato and Aristotle, but also the notion of freedom for student-citizens even in a liberal arts and democratic context. Support for this event provided by the Jasper Jacob Stahl Lectureship Fund, the Mellon Humanities Initiative--Studies in the Mediterranean, and the Classics Department with additional support from the Education, Government, and Philosophy Departments.

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Joe Goodkin: "Folk-Opera of the Odyssey"

Joe Goodkin: "Folk-Opera of the Odyssey"

October 23, 2014 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

Joe Goodkin will perform his original 30-minute Odyssey, written for solo acoustic guitar and voice.  The piece is comprised of 24 short songs performed as an uninterrupted cycle.   

Joe is a professional musician from Chicago and the lead song writer and singer for Paper Arrows.  He was a classics major at the University of Wisconsin.  

His performance of his acoustic Odyssey and accompanying talk are wonderful; the style of the music and performance are also very engaging and contemporary.  For more information visit joesodyssey.com.   

Open to the public and free.  Sponsored by the Jasper Jacob Stahl Lectureship Fund and the Classics Department.  

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