Cinema Studies Spring 2015 Calendar

Tanya Tagaq in Concert with 'Nanook of the North'

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January 25, 2015 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Memorial Hall, Pickard Theater

This event is sold out; a limited number of tickets may become available at the door.

Internationally acclaimed performer Tanya Tagaq will appear in concert in Pickard Auditorium, Bowdoin College at 7 pm on Sunday January 25, 2015. This avant-garde music sensation will create exciting new music against the backdrop of the Inuit film Nanook of the North. Admission is free, but tickets are required. Tickets can be picked up at the Smith Union Information Desk on the college campus beginning January 19, 2015.

Tagaq is a ground-breaking performer who has taken the traditional Inuit throat-singing she heard growing up in Cambridge Bay in the Canadian Arctic and transformed it, infusing it with jazz, punk, and other contemporary music, to create an exciting new sound. Reviewers describe her performances as "fierce," "exquisite," "unnerving," and"emotionally gripping."

She evokes the sounds, visions, and emotions of the northern landscape with her remarkable voice. Tagaq has performed with musicians ranging from Bjork and the Kronos Quartet to the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra. In 2014 she was awarded the Polaris Music Prize, one of Canada's top music awards, and her newest album, Animism, was listed as one of the top albums of 2014 by CBC Radio.

Nanook of the North, Robert Flaherty's classic 1922 silent film about life among the Inuit of northern Quebec, is regarded as one of the forerunners of modern documentary films. In 2012, Toronto International Film Festival commissioned composer Derek Charke, along with Tagaq, and her collaborators violinist Jesse Zubot and percussionist Jean Martin, to create a new soundscape for this silent classic. Drawing on her love of her northern home, Tagaq brings a depth of emotion and understanding to Flaherty's essentially colonial vision, reclaiming Nanook for contemporary Inuit.

This concert is presented by the Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum and Arctic Studies Center with support from the Departments of Music, Cinema Studies, and Sociology and Anthropology, Student Activities, the President's Office Wabanaki Initiative, and the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund.

Tanya Tagaq in concert with Nanook of the North was commissioned by TIFF Bell Lightbox as part of its film retrospective First Peoples Cinema: 1500 Nations, One Tradition.

For more information call Kristi Clifford at 725-3062, or visit the museum's web page www.bowdoin.edu/arctic-museum


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Film Screening: Charlie Hebdo Documentary, "C'est Dur D'être Aimé Par Des Cons"

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January 30, 2015 7:00 PM  – 9:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

In the aftermath of the attacks in Paris at the beginning of this month, the Bowdoin French Club, the Famille Francophone, will be holding a public screening of Daniel Leconte's 2008 documentary, C'est Dur D'être Aimé Par Des Cons (“It’s tough being loved by jerks”). The film follows the 2006 court case that was brought against the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo in the wake of their decision to publish cartoons depicting the Prophet Muhammad. It will be shown in French with English subtitles, with discussion to follow in English.  

The movie offers fascinating and unprecedented insight behind the scenes at this controversial publication. It also raises important questions about free speech and satire in France, a country with very different laws concerning freedom of expression. The discussion will provide an opportunity to reflect on these questions as well as the social and political consequences of recent events.

The Bowdoin Famille Francophone (aka “Bowdoin French Club”) is a student-run organization operating under the auspices of the Bowdoin Student Government. It seeks to promote Francophone values, culture and interests to the wider Bowdoin College community.

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Film: 'For the Rights of All: Ending Jim Crow in Alaska'

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February 5, 2015 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

In observance of Black History Month the Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum and Arctic Studies Center presents the film, For the Rights of All: Ending Jim Crow in Alaska.

This one-hour, award winning documentary reveals the true-life story of an extraordinary Alaskan woman who becomes an unlikely hero in the fight for civil rights. Like Native Americans in the lower forty-eight states, Alaska Natives struggled to keep their basic human rights, as well as protect their ancient ties to the land. The Bill of Rights did not apply to them.

Elizabeth Peratrovich, a young Tlingit woman and mother of three, testified before the Alaska Territorial Senate in 1945 and swayed their vote with her compelling testimony in favor of the Anti-Discrimination Act, the first civil rights bill passed in the U.S. since the Civil War.


Free and open to the public.

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Sherryl Vint: "To Seek Out New Worlds: Science Fiction in a Global Perspective"

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February 5, 2015 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

Sherryl Vint is professor of Science Fiction Media Studies at the University of California, Riverside, where she co-directs the Science Fiction and Technoculture Studies program. She is the author and/or editor of several books, including Bodies of Tomorrow (2007), Animal Alterity (2010), The Wire (2013), Science Fiction: A Guide to the Perplexed (2014), and The Routledge Concise History of Science Fiction (2011, with Mark Bould). She co-edits the journals Science Fiction Film and Television and Science Fiction Studies.

Her talk will present an overview of science fiction in a global context, exploring the ways common science fiction icons appear differently when embedded in multiple local contexts, and will discuss the significance of the recent explosion of science fiction across the globe. 

This event is free and open to the public.  For more information contact Arielle Saiber at asaiber@bowdoin.edu.  

Sponsored by the Departments of Romance Languages and English and the Cinema Studies and Gender and Women's Studies Programs.

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Nancy Blum: "Prints, Drawings, and Public Art"

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February 10, 2015 4:15 PM  – 6:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Nancy Blum is the Spring 2015 Marvin Bileck Printmaking Project visiting artist. She received her MFA at Cranbrook Academy of Art and has since been creating and exhibiting extensively in the worlds of printmaking, public art, and drawing.  Her work, which explores the pattern and architecture of nature, has been recognized through such fellowships as the Pollock-Krasner Foundation, Peter S. Reed Foundation, and Mid-Atlantic Arts Foundation. 

She has been an artist in residence and guest lecturer at numerous institutions; her work has been featured in solo exhibitions at galleries and institutions across the US, and in collections as far as Brussels and South Korea.

This event is sponsored by The Marvin Bileck and Emily Nelligan Trust, is presented by the Bowdoin College Visual Arts Department, and is free and open to the public.

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Dinnertime Film and Discussion: 'Growing Local'

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February 10, 2015 6:00 PM  – 8:00 PM
Thorne Hall, Daggett Lounge

Growing Local is a short series by Maine Farmland Trust about small farms and the uncertain fate of the local food movement. The series weaves together three separate but connected stories to create a coherent narrative about local food and local farms. The goal of the project is to help fellow Mainers, and hopefully others around the country, better understand the agrarian landscape surrounding us and the important role it plays in growing community as well as food. The film makers hope to inspire viewers to actively seek out local foods for their own health, the health of their communities and that of the planet. 

We will be joined by Kristin Pierson, Apprentice, Crystal Spring Farm; Tristan Noyes, '05 GroMaine, Aroostock County, and Sarah Wiederkehr, Winterhill Farm

Join us for dinner (get dinner 'through the line' and eat in Daggett Lounge), watch the film (starting at 6:30) and participate in conversation with table mates and local farmers. Open to students with Board Plan and others at Polar Plus rates.

This event is being hosted at Bowdoin by the Environmental Studies Program, Sustainable Bowdoin, and Bowdoin Dining.

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Second Annual World Cinema Festival: 'The Tribe' - with Kristina Toland

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February 16, 2015 7:00 PM  – 10:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

Newly arrived at a boarding school for the deaf, student Sergey quickly realizes he must win the protection of the school gang’s leader to survive. He assimilates into "the tribe" --an institutional system of organized crime involving robbery and prostitution--but compromises his position when he falls in love with a female classmate, who is also one of the gang’s sex workers. Using no spoken dialogue or subtitles, the film unfolds through body language and sign language from its cast of deaf, non-professional actors. 

Winner of the Critics' Week Grand Prix at the 2014 Cannes Film Festival, The Tribe (Miroslav Slaboshpitsky, Ukraine, 2014), is presented by Kristina Toland, visiting assistant professor, Russian. 

Bowdoin’s World Cinema Festival offers a varied program of important contemporary narrative and documentary films from around the world with post-screening discussions moderated by faculty and students. 

The public is welcomed at no charge and tickets are not required.

The 2nd Annual World Cinema Festival is sponsored by the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund, the Latin American Studies Program, the Asian Studies Program, the Africana Studies Program, the Russian Department, the German Department, the Romance Languages Department, the English Department, MacMillan House, the Bowdoin Film Society, and the Cinema Studies Program.


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Second Annual World Cinema Festival: 'The German Doctor' - with Carolyn Wolfenzon

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February 17, 2015 7:00 PM  – 10:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

Patagonia, 1960. A German doctor meets an Argentinean family and joins them on a long desert road to a small town where they will be starting a new life. Eva, Enzo and their three children welcome the doctor into their home and entrust their young daughter, Lilith to his care, not knowing they are harboring one of the most dangerous criminals in the world and that Israeli agents are desperately looking to bring him to justice. 

The German Doctor (Lucía Puenzo, Argentina, 2013) is the true story of the family who lived with Josef Mengele, the German SS officer known as the "Angel of Death," without knowing his true identity. It also follows the girl who fell in love with one of the most heinous criminals of all time in the years he spent "hiding" in South America following his escape from Germany. 

Presented by Carolyn Wolfenzon, assistant professor of romance languages.

Bowdoin’s World Cinema Festival offers a varied program of important contemporary narrative and documentary films from around the world with post-screening discussions moderated by faculty and students. 

The public is welcomed at no charge and tickets are not required.

The 2nd Annual World Cinema Festival is sponsored by the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund, the Latin American Studies Program, the Asian Studies Program, the Africana Studies Program, the Russian Department, the Romance Languages Department, the English Department, MacMillan House, the Bowdoin Film Society, and the Cinema Studies Program.

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Second Annual World Cinema Festival: 'God Loves Uganda' - with Hanetha Vete-Congolo and Laura Premack

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February 18, 2015 7:00 PM  – 10:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

As an American-influenced bill to make homosexuality punishable by death wins widespread support, tension in Uganda mounts and an atmosphere of murderous hatred takes hold. This film reveals the conflicting motives of faith and greed, ecstasy and egotism, among Ugandan ministers, American evangelical leaders and the foot soldiers of a theology that sees Uganda as ground zero in a battle for billions of souls. Through verité, interviews, and hidden camera footage – and with unprecedented access – God Loves Uganda takes viewers inside the evangelical movement in both the US and Uganda.

Presented by Hanétha Vété-Congolo, Associate Professor of Romance Languages and Laura Premack, Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow of Latin American Studies, God Loves Uganda (Roger Ross Williams, US, 2013), is a NY Times Critic’s Pick, winner of the Inspiration Award at the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival, and official selection at Sundance, HotDocs, and AFI Docs. 

Bowdoin’s World Cinema Festival offers a varied program of important contemporary narrative and documentary films from around the world with post-screening discussions moderated by faculty and students.

The public is welcomed at no charge and tickets are not required.

The 2nd Annual World Cinema Festival is sponsored by the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund, the Latin American Studies Program, the Asian Studies Program, the African Studies Program, the Russian Department, the German Department, the Romance Languages Department, the English Department, MacMillan House, the Bowdoin Film Society, and the Cinema Studies Program.

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Second Annual World Cinema Festival: 'A Touch of Sin' - with Shu-chin Tsui

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February 19, 2015 7:00 PM  – 10:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

An angry miner, enraged by widespread corruption in his village, decides to take justice into his own hands. A rootless migrant discovers the infinite possibilities of owning a firearm. A young receptionist, who dates a married man and works at a local sauna, is pushed beyond her limits by an abusive client. And a young factory worker goes from one discouraging job to the next, only to face increasingly degrading circumstances. This daring, poetic and grand-scale film focuses on four characters, each living in different provinces, who are driven to violent ends. 

Written and directed by master filmmaker Jia Zhangke (China, 2013) and presented by Shu-Chin Tsui, professor of Asian studies and cinema studies, A Touch of Sin is the winner of Best Screenplay at the Cannes Film Festival, and an official selection of the 2013 NYFF. 

Bowdoin’s World Cinema Festival offers a varied program of important contemporary narrative and documentary films from around the world with post-screening discussions moderated by faculty and students. 

The public is welcomed at no charge and tickets are not required.

The 2nd Annual World Cinema Festival is sponsored by the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund, the Latin American Studies Program, the Asian Studies Program, the African Studies Program, the Russian Department, the German Department, the Romance Languages Department, the English Department, MacMillan House, the Bowdoin Film Society, and the Cinema Studies Program.

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Second Annual World Cinema Festival: 'A Coffee in Berlin' - with Birgit Tautz

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February 20, 2015 7:00 PM  – 10:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

Twenty-something college dropout Niko is going nowhere fast. He lives for the moment as he drifts through the streets of Berlin, curiously observing everyone around him and oblivious to his growing status as an outsider. Then on one fateful day, through a series of absurdly amusing encounters, everything changes. Unable to ignore the consequences of his passivity any longer, Niko finally concludes that he has to engage with life. 

Shot in timeless black and white and enriched with a snappy jazz soundtrack, A Coffee in Berlin (Jan Ole Gerster, Germany, 2014) is a love letter to Berlin and the Generation Y experience. Presented by Birgit Tautz, Associate Professor of German, and the Bowdoin Film Society, this slacker dramedy is the winner of six German Oscar Awards including Best Film, Best Director, and Best Actor. 
 
Bowdoin’s World Cinema Festival offers a varied program of important contemporary narrative and documentary films from around the world with post-screening discussions moderated by faculty and students. 

The public is welcomed at no charge and tickets are not required.

The 2nd Annual World Cinema Festival is sponsored by the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund, the Latin American Studies Program, the Asian Studies Program, the Africana Studies Program, the Russian Department, the German Department, the Romance Languages Department, the English Department, MacMillan House, the Bowdoin Film Society, and the Cinema Studies Program.

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Second Annual World Cinema Festival: 'Loose Cannons' - with Davida Gavioli

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February 21, 2015 7:00 PM  – 10:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

Tommaso visits his family in Southern Italy to announce his plans to be a writer rather than take over their pasta-making business...and to tell them that he’s gay. But his older brother, Antonio, beats him to the punch with an unexpected announcement of his own, literally giving their father a heart attack. Tommaso must now play the dutiful son, until his boyfriend and their friends pay him a surprise visit and threaten to upend everything.

Loose Cannons / Mine Vaganti (Ferzan Ozpetek, Italy, 2010) is presented by Davida Gavioli, Senior Lecturer in Italian, and MacMillan House.

Bowdoin’s World Cinema Festival offers a varied program of important contemporary narrative and documentary films from around the world with post-screening discussions moderated by faculty and students. 

The public is welcomed at no charge and tickets are not required.

The 2nd Annual World Cinema Festival is sponsored by the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund, the Latin American Studies Program, the Asian Studies Program, the Africana Studies Program, the Russian Department,the German Department, the Romance Languages Department, the English Department, MacMillan House, the Bowdoin Film Society, and the Cinema Studies Program.

 
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Film: 'The Master Plan' with students Wilder Nicholson '16 and Paul Sullivan '16

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February 24, 2015 7:00 PM  – 8:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

The National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO), the junta ruling Thailand following the 2014 Thai coup d'état, recently devised a plan to significantly reduce deforestation in Thailand. This new land management policy, named the Master Plan, has the ambitious goal of reaching forty percent forest cover in Thailand within ten years. The plan called for removing ‘commercial investors’ from forested areas, and promised that the action would not negatively impact poor and landless villagers. The military junta, however, has begun a widespread campaign of targeting forest communities and forcing villagers off land that they've called home for decades. Villagers are facing forced evictions, arrests, and destruction of property and their livelihoods. 

Wilder Nicolson '16 and Paul Sullivan '16 spent the Fall of 2014 in Khon Kaen Thailand with Center for International Educational Exchange (CIEE) on their development and globalization program. They studied issues involving the military, martial law, agriculture, mines, dams, and other development projects. Paul and Wilder stayed in several villages that were facing severe human rights violations, and they were especially moved by the land rights conflicts in North East Thailand. 

They collaborated with the Land Reform Network, a NGO fighting for land rights, and created the documentary The Master Plan: Solving Deforestation, or Another Strategy to Remove and Evict People? to educate forest communities about the Master Plan and to spread awareness about the issue.

Informal discussion and a question and answer period will follow the film.

This event is open to the public free of charge.

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Film and Discussion with David Mrazek and Joel Greenberg: 'From Billions to None: The Passenger Pigeon's Flight to Extinction'

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February 26, 2015 5:00 PM  – 7:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

This award-winning documentary tells the incredible forgotten story of the passenger pigeon, its unlikely extinction, and its striking relevance to conservation challenges today. Almost 100 years ago on September 1, 1914, Martha, the last known passenger pigeon in existence (named after Martha Washington) died in the Cincinnati Zoo. A superabundant species of billions that darkened the entire sky disappeared in a matter of decades. 

What happened to the passenger pigeon? You could say we happened. Discover how and why this bird went extinct, and how this anthropogenic extinction foreshadows more recent, rapid, ongoing destruction of species in the wake of the deforestation, rising ocean temperatures, acidification of bodies of water, and melting of polar ice shelves that are of vital concern to the current generation of students. 

Director and co-writer David Mrazek and co-producer and co-writer Joel Greenberg enter into discussions with biologists concerning the current unsustainable taking of sharks, acidification of oceans and bleaching of coral reefs, destruction of reptile habitat, and "de-extinction" of lost species through genetic manipulation. 

View the trailer and information on the filmmakers at passengerpigeon.org.

Sponsored by Bowdoin College Departments of Art History, Biology, Cinema Studies, Education, Environmental Studies, Bowdoin Outing Club, Visual Arts and The Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund.


Open to the public.


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Film Screening: 'The Man From Oran' with Director, Actor, and Screenwriter Lyes Salem

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March 2, 2015 7:00 PM  – 10:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Corruption in political life, falsification of historical facts, personal loss, and thirst for power are all dealt with remarkable lucidity and conviction in Algerian filmmaker Lyes Salem's The Man From Oran (L'Oranais), a haunting political drama laced with the agony and angst of men and women who lived through the Algerian Revolution. 

Djaffar, the main character and “man from Oran,” has no interest in the liberation movement until he finds himself involved with his friend Hamid in the murder of a French farmer. By the time they manage to run away, Djaffar's beloved wife has been raped by the farmer’s son as a vendetta. She will give birth to a son of her own and die in despair. 

All of this is kept in secret from Djaffar until after the war when he returns home a hero. He accepts the boy as his own, but asks everybody to act as if the rape never occurred and Hamid--now a minister in the new government--helps him rewrite his story. But year after year they grow apart and their deliberate falsification of history has terrible consequences for them, their friends and families, and for the country. The movie enumerates through Djaffar's life how tragic separations, breakdown of families, small sacrifices and strong selfish desires change the tone and tenor of a society.

This event is sponsored by the Department of Romance Languages, the Cinema Studies Program and the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund.


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David Bruce '13: "Cities at Sea" Artist Talk and Gallery Opening

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March 3, 2015 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Edwards Arts Center, Room 115 [Digital Media Lab]

David Bruce was a recipient of the Thomas J. Watson fellowship during the 2012 through 2013 academic year. The exhibition Cities at Sea is the visual journal of drawings, paintings, and sketches that document his fellowship experience, during which he traveled to the Netherlands, Argentina, India, Bangladesh, Indonesia, and Singapore to investigate what densely populated coastal cities are doing to adapt to the water-related threats of climate change. 

Cities at Sea will run from Monday, March 2 through Sunday, March 29, 2015 in the Edwards Center Main Gallery. There will be a reception and artist talk following opening day in the Edwards Digital Media Lab at 7:00pm on Tuesday, March 3. 

This event is sponsored by the Departments of Visual Art and Environmental Studies and is free and open to the public.

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Reception: Nancy Blum, Visiting Artist in Residence

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March 5, 2015 4:00 PM  – 6:00 PM
Edwards Arts Center, Room 116 [Gallery]

Artist in Residence Nancy Blum will present her work during a reception hosted by the Bowdoin College Department of Visual Art. 

Nancy Blum received her MFA at Cranbrook Academy of Art and has since been creating and exhibiting extensively in the worlds of printmaking, public art, and drawing.  Her work, which explores the pattern and architecture of nature, has been recognized through such fellowships as the Pollock-Krasner Foundation, Peter S. Reed Foundation, and Mid-Atlantic Arts Foundation. She has been an artist in residence and guest lecturer at numerous institutions; her work has been featured in solo exhibitions at galleries and institutions across the US, and in collections as far as Brussels and South Korea.

This event is free and open to the public. 

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Film Screening and Discussion with Toru Shinoda: 'Hafu,' and "What Does it Mean to be Japanese"?

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March 25, 2015 6:00 PM  – 8:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

With an ever increasing movement of people between places in this transnational age, there is a mounting number of mixed-race people in Japan; some visible, others not. The film Hafu explores the intricacies of the multicultural experience in modern day Japan as it follows the lives of five "hafus"-the Japanese term for people who are half Japanese-in a nation that once proudly proclaimed itself as the mono-ethnic nation. It examines the issues of race, diversity, multiculturalism, nationality, and identity within this new community to answer the question of what it means to be hafu, to be Japanese, and ultimately, what all of it means for Japan. 

Narrated by the hafus themselves, the viewer is guided through a myriad of experiences that are influenced by upbringing, family relationships, education, and even physical appearance. As five unique life stories become interwoven, audiences discover the depth and diversity of hafu personal identities. 

The screening will be followed by a student panel discussion moderated by Professor Toru Shinoda, faculty of social sciences at Waseda University, one of the most prestigious universities in Japan. 

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Film Screening: 'The Auschwitz Gateway Film' with Filmmaker David Conover

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March 25, 2015 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Filmmaker David Conover will screen his recently-produced eight-minute film created for the Auschwitz-Birkenau Memorial Museum near Krakow, Poland.

The Auschwitz Gateway Film is a compelling and heartbreaking introduction to the horrors of the Holocaust at the largest concentration camp of the Nazi era, and will be shown to museum visitors before they walk through the infamous Arbeit Macht Frei ("work makes you free") gateway to enter the camp.

The screening will be followed by a conversation with Conover and Professor of English and Cinema Studies, Aviva Briefel.

Free and open to the public. No tickets required.
Call 725-3552 or email lholland@bowdoin.edu for more information.

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Bowdoin Amnesty International Screens "Girl Rising"

March 26, 2015 7:00 PM  – 9:30 PM
Searles Science Building, Room 315

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Justice for Palestine Week, Film Screening and Conversation with Director Yasmine Perni - 'The Stones Cry Out'

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March 28, 2015 2:00 PM  – 4:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

In 1948, tens of thousands of Palestinian villagers were driven from their homes in the fertile hills and valleys of the Galilee in what was officially dubbed 'Operation Broom,' intended to literally sweep them away to make room for settlers in the newly created state of Israel. After the Galilee came the expropriation of the West Bank in 1967; Bethlehem, the birthplace of Christ, is now hemmed in by a wall, cut off from Jerusalem, and robbed of much of its agricultural land.

The Stones Cry Out examines the fact that while media coverage of the conflict in Palestine frames the struggle as one between Muslims and Jews, Palestine was the birthplace of Christianity, Palestinians
are both Muslims and Christians, and Palestinian Christians have played a critical role in their land's history and the struggle to maintain its identity.
Director Yasmine Perni moved from her native Italy to the Middle East when she was thirteen years old, living in Sudan, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Jordan and Jerusalem. A graduate of the University of London's School of Oriental and African Studies, she has worked as a journalist, photographer, television producer and mother, and speaks Italian, English, Swedish and Arabic.

Perni went into documentary filmmaking inspired by the Christians of Palestine, whose story of perseverance and pride has been largely obscured by the headlines. It was her first experience at producing and writing a documentary, and she conducted extensive research, combed through official Palestinian. Israel and United Nations film archives, and traveled the length and breadth of historic Palestine. 

This event is scheduled as part of Justice for Palestine Week, March 27 through April 1, 2015.

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Gone to the Dogs: Heroism and Parody in "So Quiet on the Canine Front" a discussion with Jakub Kazecki

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March 30, 2015 2:30 PM  – 4:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

Jakub Kazecki, Assistant Professor of German
Department of German & Russian Studies, Bates College

Monday, March 30 at 2:30 in Smith Auditorium, Sill Hall

The 1930 American war movie All Quiet on the Western Front by Lewis Milestone, a faithful adaptation of the novel Im Westen nichts Neues by the German author Erich Maria Remarque, became a big hit in the United States and Great Britain. In the Weimar Republic, the political right accused the film of anti-German sentiment and, as was the case with the novel published a year earlier, of a distorted portrayal of the war, but the impact of the movie on the German audience was very significant nevertheless. The adaptation, made with a large budget and care for detail, created narrative images of combat and stylistic solutions in the depiction of war that, consequently, became visual marks of the Great War, easily recognizable icons and figures of remembrance of the conflict. As a standard-setting war production, All Quiet on the Western Front also provoked a number of humorist responses. Professor Kazecki will discuss the short 1931 movie A Dogville Comedy: So Quiet on the Canine Front by Zion Myers and Jules White, as a film parody of the movie All Quiet on the Western Front, with trained dogs playing all characters and dubbed by voice actors.

Sponsored by the departments of German, Romance Languages and the Cinema Studies Program.

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Film Screening: 'Secundaria' with Filmmaker Mary Jane Doherty

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March 30, 2015 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Cleaveland 151

Boston University film professor Mary Jane Doherty traveled to Cuba multiple times over a period of years to complete what the Boston Globe called a “lucid, watchful portrait of young ballet dancers desperately trying to plié their way out of poverty and into the Ballet Nacional."

Doherty’s documentary Secundaria follows one high school class on its journey through Cuba’s world famous National Ballet School.  The teenage dancers love to dance…but many of them must dance as the only way to improve the lives of their impoverished families. 

As we follow Doherty’s primary subjects—middle-class Gabriela, poor Mayara, poorer Moises— Secundaria reveals itself through cinematic storytelling (and without a script, staging, or interviews) as being less about competing in dance and more about battling into adulthood.

Post-screening discussion with the filmmaker.

Free and open to the public - no tickets required.

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Film Screening and Q&A: 'Nostalgia for the Light'

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March 31, 2015 7:00 PM  – 10:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

In this enthralling and award-winning documentary, Chilean master director Patricio Guzman travels 10,000 feet above sea level to the driest place on earth, the Atacama Desert, where atop the mountains astronomers from all over the world gather to observe the stars. The sky is so translucent that it allows them to see right to the boundaries of the universe.

But the Atacama is also a place where the harsh heat of the sun keeps human remains intact: Pre-Columbian mummies; nineteenth-century explorers and miners; and political prisoners, disappeared by the Chilean army after the military coup of September 1973. While astronomers examine the most distant and oldest galaxies, women at the foot of the mountains search, even after twenty-five years, for the remains of their loved ones, whose bodies were dumped here, to reclaim their families' histories.

Melding the celestial quest of the astronomers and the earthly one of the women, Nostalgia for the Light is a moving and deeply personal odyssey.

Followed by a Q&A with Allen Wells, Roger Howell, Jr. professor of history; Sarah Childress, visiting assistant professor of cinema studies; and Sarah Montross, Andrew W. Mellon post-doctoral curatorial fellow.

Presented in conjunction with the exhibition, Past Futures: Science Fiction, Space Travel, and Postwar Art of the Americas.

RSVPs are requested but not required. You may RSVP at: https://nostalgiaforthelight.eventbrite.com or contact artmuseumevents@bowdoin.edu.

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Lisa Yaszek: "Afrofuturism as Global Science Fiction?"

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April 1, 2015 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

Lisa Yaszek explores the global aspects and movement of science fiction over the past two centuries through the focusing lens of Afrofuturism. As a mode of aesthetic practice characterized by the use of science fictional tropes and narrative technique to investigate the necessary relations of science, technology, and race, Afrofuturism has been deployed by artists across media to recover lost African and Afrodiasporic histories and to imagine rich, racially-diverse worlds of tomorrow that oppose the white-washed futures implicit in much first-world scientific and economic rhetoric. 

Yaszek begins her talk with a brief overview of Afrofuturism and its
relation to genre science fiction. She then considers the evolution of
Afrofuturism from its roots in nineteenth-century African-American utopian and military fiction to its integration with mid-twentieth- century Western science fiction and its current spread across the Atlantic seaboard and Africa itself. Taken together, the stories, films, and comics produced by black men and women over the past 200 years demonstrates both the global nature of race relations in the modern era and the centrality of science and technology to the production of these relations.

Lisa Yaszek is a professor of science fiction studies a the School of Literature, Media and Communication at Georgia Tech, where she also serves as the director of the SciFi@Tech. She is the past president of the Science Fiction Research Association, and her research interests include science fiction, cultural history, critical race and gender studies, and science and technical studies. Her books include Galactic Suburbia: Recovering Women's Science Fiction, (Ohio State University Press, 2008), and she co-edited the Configurations special double issue on science fiction author Kim Stanley Robinson (Winter-Spring 2012), among other publications. She is currently completing an anthology on women's work in the early science fiction community and serving as associate producer for the science fiction film Rite of Passage.

This event is open to the public and is free of charge.

For more information, contact Arielle Saiber (asaiber@bowdoin.edu).

Sponsored by the Departments of Romance Languages, English and Africana Studies and the Cinema Studies Program.

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Justice for Palestine Week, Film Screening: 'Budrus'

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April 1, 2015 8:30 PM  – 10:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Nearly seven years ago, in the middle of the bloody battle
between Palestinians and Israelis known as the second intifada, an extraordinary set of events occurred in a poor West Bank village. Israel was building a security barrier, a mix of fencing and wall, to block terrorists. But the route was swallowing up large tracts of Palestinian land and was impossibly disruptive in places, including in the village of Budrus. Scores of ancient olive trees that provided a living were uprooted, and the villagers were going to be cut off from their farmlands.

The people of Budrus fought back, but not with arms. Led by a father-daughter team, they unified feuding political factions, brought Palestinian women from inside their homes to stand up to bulldozers and armed troops, and invited Israeli activists to join the protest. After ten months of relentless and disciplined work, the Israeli military rerouted the barrier around their lands. 

The documentary film Budrus highlights the non-violent resistance in the Palestinian village. Producer Ronit Avni stated that the film was made in response to questions concerning the existence of Palestinian non-violence movements and explores what it looks like when such a movement emerges.

This event is scheduled as part of Justice for Palestine Week, March 27 through April 1, 2015.

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Francophone Film Festival - 'In The House' (Dans La Maison)

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April 2, 2015 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

A sixteen-year-old boy insinuates himself into the house of a fellow student from his literature class and writes about it in essays for his French teacher. Faced with this gifted and unusual pupil, the teacher rediscovers his enthusiasm for his work, but the boy's intrusion will unleash a series of uncontrollable events. Directed by Francois Ozon and based on the play The Boy in the Last Row by Juan Mayorga, the film was awarded the main prize at the 2012 San Sebastian International Film Festival, the Golden Shell, as well as the Jury Prize for Best Screenplay.

Presented as part of the Bowdoin Francophone Film Festival, a part of the Tournees Festival, and made possible with the support of the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the US, the Centre National de la Cinematographie et de l'Image Animee, and the Franco-American Cultural Fund.

Additional support provided by the Department of Romance Languages, La Famille francophone, as well as the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund.

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Francophone Film Festival: 'Ernest and Celestine'

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April 3, 2015 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

There is a world of where the bears live above ground in their cities and the rodents live below in in their underground ones in mutual fear and hate. However, Celestine, an apprentice mouse dentist, finds at least momentary common cause with Ernest, a poor street Bear musician, that gets them rejected from both their respective worlds.

Even in the face of misfortune, the exiles find a growing friendship between themselves as their respective talents flower because of it. Yet despite this, their quietly profound challenge to the founding prejudices of their worlds cannot be ignored as the authorities track them down. When that happens, Ernest and Celestine must stand up for their love in the face of such bigotry and achieve the impossible.

Based on a series of children's books of the same name, the film was selected to be screened in the Directors' Fortnight section at the 2012 Cannes Film Festival, as part of the TIFF Kids programme at the 2012 Toronto International Film Festival, and at the 2013 Hong Kong International Film Festival. It was selected for the grand competition at feature film edition of the 2013 World festival of animated film Animafest Zagreb and was screened as the opening film. The film received widespread critical acclaim, and became the first animated film to win the Magritte Award for Best Film.

Presented as part of the Bowdoin Francophone Film Festival, a part of the Tournees Festival, and made possible with the support of the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the US, the Centre National de la Cinematographie et de l'Image Animee, and the Franco-American Cultural Fund.

Additional support provided by the Department of Romance Languages, La Famille francophone, as well as the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund.

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Francophone Film Festival: 'Ernest and Celestine' (Children's Matinee)

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April 4, 2015 10:00 AM  – 12:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

There is a world of where the bears live above ground in their cities and the rodents live below in in their underground ones in mutual fear and hate. However, Celestine, an apprentice mouse dentist, finds at least momentary common cause with Ernest, a poor street Bear musician, that gets them rejected from both their respective worlds.

Even in the face of misfortune, the exiles find a growing friendship between themselves as their respective talents flower because of it. Yet despite this, their quietly profound challenge to the founding prejudices of their worlds cannot be ignored as the authorities track them down. When that happens, Ernest and Celestine must stand up for their love in the face of such bigotry and achieve the impossible.

Based on a series of children's books of the same name, the film was selected to be screened in the Directors' Fortnight section at the 2012 Cannes Film Festival, as part of the TIFF Kids programme at the 2012 Toronto International Film Festival, and at the 2013 Hong Kong International Film Festival. It was selected for the grand competition at feature film edition of the 2013 World festival of animated film Animafest Zagreb and was screened as the opening film. The film received widespread critical acclaim, and became the first animated film to win the Magritte Award for Best Film.

Presented as part of the Bowdoin Francophone Film Festival, a part of the Tournees Festival, and made possible with the support of the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the US, the Centre National de la Cinematographie et de l'Image Animee, and the Franco-American Cultural Fund.

Additional support provided by the Department of Romance Languages, La Famille francophone, as well as the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund.

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Aviva Briefel, Bowdoin Friends Book Lecture: "Sherlocked: Desire and Detection"

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April 9, 2015 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

Aviva Briefel explores the cultural obsession with Sherlock Holmes that started in 1886 with the publication of A Study in Scarlet and extends well into the present day. Focusing on Arthur Conan Doyle's The Sign of Four (1890), A Scandal in Bohemia (1891), and the adaptations of these texts found in the BBC series Sherlock (2010- ), Briefel will discuss this obsession in relation to depictions of romantic (and not so romantic) desire found in the stories themselves.

Aviva Briefel is professor of English and cinema studies. She has published several papers about horror films and was commentator on Bravo's 100 Scariest Movie Moments and Even Scarier Movie Moments.

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Francophone Film Festival: Cousin Jules

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April 9, 2015 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

After winning a prize at the Locarno Film Festival in 1973, Dominique Benicheti's magnificent documentary about the quotidian rhythms of an elderly couple in rural Burgundy unjustly remained without US distribution for 40 years. Filmed over a five-year period--and shot in CinemaScope and recorded in stereo--this immersive portrait follows Jules Guiteaux (a distant relative of the director's) and his wife, Felicie, as they go about their formidable tasks. Jules, a blacksmith, is shown hammering out hinges and other implements as his wife tends to their vegetable garden and prepares meals and mid-morning coffee. Benicheti, working with cinematographers Pierre William Glenn and Paul Launay, patiently observes these labor-intensive chores, daily rituals that are attended to with utmost precision and grace and never less than transfixing to watch. Although Jules and Felicie, both born in 1891, rarely speak in the film, their silence conveys the deep intimacy of spouses who have spent six decades together.

Presented as part of the Bowdoin Francophone Film Festival, a part of the Tournees Festival, and made possible with the support of the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the US, the Centre National de la Cinematographie et de l'Image Animee, and the Franco-American Cultural Fund.

Additional support provided by the Department of Romance Languages, La Famille francophone, as well as the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund.

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Leslie Morgan Steiner: "Understanding Violence in Relationships"

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April 9, 2015 8:00 PM  – 10:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

At 22, Leslie Morgan Steiner seemed to have it all: good looks, a Harvard diploma, a glamorous job in New York City. Plus a handsome, funny boyfriend who adored her. But behind the appearance of her success, this golden girl hid a dark secret. She'd made a mistake shared by millions: she fell in love with the wrong person--that is, madly in love with a man who routinely abused her and threatened her life. 

Steiner is a columnist, blogger, and advocate for domestic assault survivors. Using her personal narrative, she sheds light on the complexities of relationship violence. Crazy Love, her 2009 memoir about surviving domestic violence, was a New York Times bestseller, People Pick, Book of the Week for The Week magazine, and subject of the first TED Talk by a domestic violence survivor. 

Her visit is intended to bring visibility to the fact that abuse does happen, and it does happen within relationships. Sometimes we idealize relationships and assume they are safe havens, but this is not necessarily the case. Furthermore, abuse happens even in environments of privilege, intelligence, and self-respect. She speaks articulately and profoundly about these realities, and sheds light on the complicated question of why it is often difficult for survivors to leave their abusers. 
 
Sponsored by: Lectures and Concerts, Gender Violence Prevention and Education, the Women's Resource Center, the Resource Center for Sexual and Gender Diversity, the Office of the Dean, the Office of Residential Life, the Kurtz Fund, Health Education, Counseling Services, Gender and Women's Studies, the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Cinema Studies, and Department of Psychology.

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What is Digital and Computational Studies and How Can this Bowdoin Initiative Help you Build your Future?

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April 14, 2015 6:30 PM  – 8:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Room 303 (South)

Join professors Crystal Hall and Mohammad Irfan for a discussion of what is Digital and Computational Studies - including previous and upcoming courses, and the difference between Computer Science and DCS. Find out why learning the use of digital tools in your area of study will give you a leg-up in your chosen profession.

Sponsored by the Bowdoin Digital and Computational Studies Initiative. Refreshments will be served.

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Francophone Film Festival: Sister (L'enfant d'en haut)

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April 16, 2015 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

A keenly observed examination of class differences and tenuous family ties, Ursula Meier's accomplished second film (after 2008's equally assured Home) focuses on 12-year-old Simon and his desperate attempts to survive. Simon lives in a bleak housing project in the valley of a posh Swiss ski resort. This tiny, cunning boy steals skis and other expensive equipment, later reselling it to his neighbors. The money Simon earns from his illegal trade supports not just himself but his young mother, Louise, a wayward, unemployed young woman in her twenties who tries to pass him as her brother. 

The contrasts between the abundant privilege of the vacationing skiers and the dreary hand-to-mouth existence of Simon are further highlighted by ace cinematographer Agnes Godard: She masterfully shoots the resort as a majestic expanse of bright blue and white, while, down below, Simon's immediate environment is rendered in punishingly drab gray. In his indelible, heartbreaking portrayal of Simon, Klein joins the ranks of cinema's greatest child actors.

Presented as part of the Bowdoin Francophone Film Festival, a part of the Tournees Festival, and made possible with the support of the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the US, the Centre National de la Cinematographie et de l'Image Animee, and the Franco-American Cultural Fund.

Additional support provided by the Department of Romance Languages, La Famille francophone, as well as the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund.

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A Filmmaker's Perspective with David Conover: "The Arrival of the Drones"

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April 21, 2015 7:00 PM  – 8:00 PM
Searles Science Building, Room 315

Wendell Berry once wrote "If you want to see where you are, you will have to get out of your space vehicle, out of your car, off your horse, and walk over the ground."  Maybe not. Some people fear them. Others embrace them. Take a closer look at what drones can - and cannot - see.

Filmmaker David Conover has actively worked with drones for four years and will share his observations, footage, and stories of freedom, control, death, and creativity in this screening and talk. 
 
Sponsored by the Office of the Dean for Academic Affairs and the Cinema Studies Program. For more information, contact the Cinema Studies Program at 725-3552 or lholland@bowdoin.edu.

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Francophone Film Festival: The Missing Picture (L'Image Manquante)

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April 23, 2015 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

How can a filmmaker portray incomprehensible barbarity, especially when he himself and everyone he knew and loved was directly affected by this horror? Rithy Panh ingeniously uses carved and painted figures to represent himself and his family (and many others), who had to flee Phnom Penh for agricultural labor camps on April 17, 1975, the day that the Khmer Rouge seized Cambodia's capital city. 

In calm, occasionally astringent first-person narration, we learn that Panh was 13 when Pol Pot began his genocidal regime; by 1979, the year that the Khmer Rouge leader was removed from power, the director's parents, sisters, and a niece and nephew were dead, among the millions who perished. 
The title refers to the fact that almost all of the documentary footage - snippets of which is interspersed throughout the film - that exists from the Khmer Rouge's horrific four-year reign is nothing but propaganda that glorifies the party and its commander. What was never documented was the legions of Cambodians and their relentless suffering. Against intricately detailed dioramas, Panh's small clay human surrogates inexorably, almost magically, assume the qualities and dimensions of real people.

Presented as part of the Bowdoin Francophone Film Festival, a part of the Tournees Festival, and made possible with the support of the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the US, the Centre National de la Cinematographie et de l'Image Animee, and the Franco-American Cultural Fund.

Additional support provided by the Department of Romance Languages, La Famille francophone, as well as the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund.

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Exhibition Opening: Visual Art Majors, Class of 2015

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April 30, 2015 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Edwards Arts Center, Miscellaneous

Work by visual art majors from the Class of 2015 will be on display throughout the Edwards Arts Center.Come celebrate the culmination of the hard work and talent of this year's visual art seniors.


Refreshments will be provided.Hope to see you there!

Artwork: Mikaela Cooper '14

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Film Screening and Discussion with Wang Jiuliang and Shu-Chin Tsui: "Plastic China"

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May 4, 2015 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

The waste that we produce each day gets tossed away and quickly disappears from our view. But where does it go? Is it recycled properly as we hope?  

Plastic China is a story about how plastic waste from all around the world, including the United States, ends up in China. It is because of this plastic waste that water is no longer clean, air is no longer fresh, and food is no longer safe in many areas of the vast country. People living in these polluted areas experience elevated rates of disease and mortality. This film reveals the shocking degree to which we all play a part in this problem; the connection among people around the world grows ever closer, and China is in fact not that far from home. 

Film screening (30 minutes) followed by a question and answer session with the filmmaker and Bowdoin's Shu-chin Tsui, professor of Asian studies and cinema studies. 

Wang Jiang graduated from the Communication University of China and worked for several years as a freelance photographer. He is currently a visiting scholar and artist-in-residence at the University of California, Berkeley. 

Shu-chin Tsui earned her Ph.D. in cinema and culture studies at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She is currently teaching 'Ecocinima: China's Ecological and Environmental Crisis.' 

Sponsored by the Asian Studies Program, the Environmental Studies Program, and Cinema Studies.

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Honors Day 2015

May 6, 2015 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Studzinski Recital Hall, Kanbar Auditorium

Honors Day will be celebrated on Wednesday, May 6, 2015, with a ceremony in Studzinski Recital Hall, Kanbar Auditorium beginning at 7:00 p.m.

A reception will be held for scholars and faculty from 6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. in the lobby of Studzinski Recital Hall. Please join us in celebrating the success of our students.

For families and friends unable to attend the ceremony, Honors Day will be streamed live. Please visit Bowdoin College Live Events on the day of the event.

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Visual Art Department Open House

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May 8, 2015 5:00 PM  – 7:00 PM
Edwards Arts Center, Miscellaneous

Work by visual art majors from the Class of 2015 will be on display throughout the Edwards Arts Center. Come celebrate the culmination of the hard work and talent of this year's visual art seniors. 

Refreshments will be provided. Hope to see you there!

Artwork: Joanna Gromadzki '14

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