Spring 2012 Curses

102. Introductory Chemistry II
Elizabeth Stemmler M 11:30 - 12:25, W 11:30 - 12:25, F 11:30 - 12:25
The second course in a two-semester introductory college chemistry sequence. Introduction to chemical bonding and intermolecular forces; characterization of chemical systems at equilibrium and spontaneous processes; the rates of chemical reactions; and special topics. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week.
105. Perspectives in Environmental Science
John Lichter T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
Functioning of the earth system is defined by the complex and fascinating interaction of processes within and between four principal spheres: land, air, water, and life. Leverages key principles of environmental chemistry and ecology to unravel the intricate connectedness of natural phenomena and ecosystem function. Fundamental biological and chemical concepts are used to understand the science behind the environmental dilemmas facing societies as a consequence of human activities. Laboratory sessions consist of local field trips, laboratory experiments, group research, case study exercises, and discussions of current and classic scientific literature.
109. General Chemistry
Daniel Steffenson M 9:30 - 10:25, W 9:30 - 10:25, F 9:30 - 10:25
A one-semester introductory chemistry course. Introduction to models of atomic structure, chemical bonding, and intermolecular forces; characterization of chemical systems at equilibrium and spontaneous processes; the rates of chemical reactions; and special topics. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week. To ensure proper placement, students must take the chemistry placement examination and must be recommended for placement in Chemistry 109.
109. General Chemistry
Ronald Christensen M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25
A one-semester introductory chemistry course. Introduction to models of atomic structure, chemical bonding, and intermolecular forces; characterization of chemical systems at equilibrium and spontaneous processes; the rates of chemical reactions; and special topics. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week. To ensure proper placement, students must take the chemistry placement examination and must be recommended for placement in Chemistry 109.
226. Organic Chemistry II
Michael Danahy M 8:30 - 9:25, W 8:30 - 9:25, F 8:30 - 9:25
Continuation of the study of the compounds of carbon. Highlights the reactions of aromatic, carbonyl-containing, and amine functional groups. Mechanistic reasoning provides a basis for understanding these reactions. Skills for designing logical synthetic approaches to complex organic molecules are developed. Chemistry 225 and 226 cover the material of the usual course in organic chemistry and form a foundation for further work in organic chemistry and biochemistry. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week.
226. Organic Chemistry II
Ryan Nelson M 11:30 - 12:25, W 11:30 - 12:25, F 11:30 - 12:25
Continuation of the study of the compounds of carbon. Highlights the reactions of aromatic, carbonyl-containing, and amine functional groups. Mechanistic reasoning provides a basis for understanding these reactions. Skills for designing logical synthetic approaches to complex organic molecules are developed. Chemistry 225 and 226 cover the material of the usual course in organic chemistry and form a foundation for further work in organic chemistry and biochemistry. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week.
232. Biochemistry
Danielle Dube T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
Focuses on the chemistry of living organisms. Topics include structure, conformation, and properties of the major classes of biomolecules (proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and lipids); enzyme mechanisms, kinetics, and regulation; metabolic transformations; energetics and metabolic control. Lectures and four hours of laboratory work per week.
240. Inorganic Chemistry
Jeffrey Nagle M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25
An introduction to the chemistry of the elements with a focus on chemical bonding, periodic properties, and coordination compounds. Topics in solid state, bioinorganic, and environmental inorganic chemistry also are included. Provides a foundation for further work in chemistry and biochemistry. Lectures and four hours of laboratory work per week.
252. Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy
Ronald Christensen T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55
Development and principles of quantum chemistry with applications to atomic structure, chemical bonding, chemical reactivity, and molecular spectroscopy. Lectures and four hours of laboratory work per week. Mathematics 181 is recommended.
305. Environmental Fate of Organic Chemicals
Dharanija Vasudevan M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55
More than 100,000 synthetic chemicals are currently in daily use. In order to determine the risk posed to humans and ecosystems, we need to understand and anticipate the extent and routes of chemical exposure. Addresses the fate of organic chemicals following their intentional or unintentional release into the environment. Why do these chemicals either persist or break down, and how are they distributed between surface water, ground water, soil, sediments, biota, and air? Analysis of chemical structure used to gain insight into molecular interactions that determine the various chemical transfer and transformation processes, while emphasizing the quantitative description of these processes.
340. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
Jeffrey Nagle T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
Inorganic chemistry is incredibly diverse and wide-ranging in scope. Symmetry, spectroscopy, and quantum-based theories and computational methods are employed to gain insight into the molecular and electronic structures and reaction mechanisms of inorganic compounds. Examples from the current literature emphasized, including topics in inorganic photochemistry and biochemistry. Chemistry 252 is recommended.