Spring 2013 Courses

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102. Introductory Chemistry II
Michael Danahy M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25 Cleaveland-151
The second course in a two-semester introductory college chemistry sequence. Introduction to chemical bonding and intermolecular forces; characterization of chemical systems at equilibrium and spontaneous processes; the rates of chemical reactions; and special topics. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week. Students who have taken Chemistry 109 may not take Chemistry 102 for credit.

102. Introductory Chemistry II
Ryan Nelson T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25 Searles-315
The second course in a two-semester introductory college chemistry sequence. Introduction to chemical bonding and intermolecular forces; characterization of chemical systems at equilibrium and spontaneous processes; the rates of chemical reactions; and special topics. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week. Students who have taken Chemistry 109 may not take Chemistry 102 for credit.

105. Perspectives in Environmental Science
John Lichter T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25 Druckenmiller-020
Functioning of the earth system is defined by the complex and fascinating interaction of processes within and between four principal spheres: land, air, water, and life. Leverages key principles of environmental chemistry and ecology to unravel the intricate connectedness of natural phenomena and ecosystem function. Fundamental biological and chemical concepts are used to understand the science behind the environmental dilemmas facing societies as a consequence of human activities. Laboratory sessions consist of local field trips, laboratory experiments, group research, case study exercises, and discussions of current and classic scientific literature.

109. General Chemistry
Daniel Steffenson M 9:30 - 10:25, W 9:30 - 10:25, F 9:30 - 10:25 Druckenmiller-020
A one-semester introductory chemistry course. Introduction to models of atomic structure, chemical bonding, and intermolecular forces; characterization of chemical systems at equilibrium and spontaneous processes; the rates of chemical reactions; and special topics. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week. Students who have taken Chemistry 102 may not take Chemistry 109 for credit. To ensure proper placement, students must take the chemistry placement examination and must be recommended for placement in Chemistry 109.

205. Environmental Chemistry
Dharni Vasudevan T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55 Druckenmiller-004
Focuses on two key processes that influence human and wildlife exposure to potentially harmful substances—chemical speciation and transformation. Equilibrium principles as applied to acid-base, complexation, precipitation, and dissolution reactions are used to explore organic and inorganic compound speciation in natural and polluted waters; quantitative approaches are emphasized. Weekly laboratory sections are concerned with the detection and quantification of organic and inorganic compounds in air, water, and soils/sediments.

226. Organic Chemistry II
The Department M 8:30 - 9:25, W 8:30 - 9:25, F 8:30 - 9:25 Cleaveland-151
Continuation of the study of the compounds of carbon. Highlights the reactions of aromatic, carbonyl-containing, and amine functional groups. Mechanistic reasoning provides a basis for understanding these reactions. Skills for designing logical synthetic approaches to complex organic molecules are developed. Chemistry 225 and 226 cover the material of the usual course in organic chemistry and form a foundation for further work in organic chemistry and biochemistry. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week.

226. Organic Chemistry II
The Department M 9:30 - 10:25, W 9:30 - 10:25, F 9:30 - 10:25 Cleaveland-151
Continuation of the study of the compounds of carbon. Highlights the reactions of aromatic, carbonyl-containing, and amine functional groups. Mechanistic reasoning provides a basis for understanding these reactions. Skills for designing logical synthetic approaches to complex organic molecules are developed. Chemistry 225 and 226 cover the material of the usual course in organic chemistry and form a foundation for further work in organic chemistry and biochemistry. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week.

226. Organic Chemistry II
Benjamin Gorske M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25 Druckenmiller-016
Continuation of the study of the compounds of carbon. Highlights the reactions of aromatic, carbonyl-containing, and amine functional groups. Mechanistic reasoning provides a basis for understanding these reactions. Skills for designing logical synthetic approaches to complex organic molecules are developed. Chemistry 225 and 226 cover the material of the usual course in organic chemistry and form a foundation for further work in organic chemistry and biochemistry. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week.

232. Biochemistry
Danielle Dube T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25 Druckenmiller-004
Focuses on the chemistry of living organisms. Topics include structure, conformation, and properties of the major classes of biomolecules (proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and lipids); enzyme mechanisms, kinetics, and regulation; metabolic transformations; energetics and metabolic control. Lectures and four hours of laboratory work per week.

240. Inorganic Chemistry
Jeffrey Nagle T 8:30 - 9:55, TH 8:30 - 9:55 Druckenmiller-004
An introduction to the chemistry of the elements with a focus on chemical bonding, periodic properties, and coordination compounds. Topics in solid state, bioinorganic, and environmental inorganic chemistry also are included. Provides a foundation for further work in chemistry and biochemistry. Lectures and four hours of laboratory work per week.

252. Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy
Soren Eustis M 9:30 - 10:25, W 9:30 - 10:25, F 9:30 - 10:25 Druckenmiller-024
Development and principles of quantum chemistry with applications to atomic structure, chemical bonding, chemical reactivity, and molecular spectroscopy. Lectures and four hours of laboratory work per week. Mathematics 181 is recommended. Note: Chemistry 251 is not a prerequisite for Chemistry 252.

310. Instrumental Analysis
Ryan Nelson M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55 Druckenmiller-024
Theoretical and practical aspects of instrumental techniques, including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry are covered, in conjunction with advanced chromatographic methods. Applications of instrumental techniques to the analysis of biological and environmental samples are covered. Lectures and two hours of laboratory work per week.

325. Structure Determination in Organic Chemistry
Richard Broene M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55 Buck Center-211
The theory and application of spectroscopic techniques useful for the determination of the molecular structures of organic molecules are discussed. Mass spectrometry and infrared, ultraviolet-visible, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy are applied to structure elucidation. Heavy emphasis is placed on applications of multiple-pulse, Fourier transform NMR spectroscopic techniques. Lectures and at least two hours of laboratory work per week.

331. Chemical Biology
Danielle Dube T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55 Adams-103
The power of organic synthesis has had a tremendous impact on our understanding of biological systems. Examines case studies in which synthetically derived small molecules have been used as tools to tease out answers to questions of biological significance. Topics include synthetic strategies that have been used to make derivatives of the major classes of biomolecules (nucleic acids, proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids) and the experimental breakthroughs these molecules have enabled (e.g., polymerase-chain reaction, DNA sequencing, microarray technology). Emphasis on current literature, experimental design, and critical review of manuscripts.