Spring 2011 Courses

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056. Investigations: The Chemistry of Forensic Science
Elizabeth Stemmler M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25
A study of scientific principles that underlie chemical, instrumental, and some biological techniques used in criminal investigations by forensic scientists. Focuses on understanding materials at an atomic or molecular level to learn how forensic chemistry is used to make qualitative and quantitative measurements key to forensic investigations. Makes use of case studies and the study of specific chemical, physical, and spectroscopic techniques used in forensic investigations. Assumes no background in science. Students will take part in three to four laboratory experiences. Not open to students who have credit for a chemistry course numbered 100 or higher.

102. Introductory Chemistry II
Elizabeth Stemmler M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25
The second course in a two-semester introductory college chemistry sequence. Introduction to chemical bonding and intermolecular forces; characterization of chemical systems at equilibrium and spontaneous processes; the rates of chemical reactions; and special topics. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week.

105. Perspectives in Environmental Science
Dharanija Vasudevan T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
Functioning of the earth system is defined by the complex and fascinating interaction of processes within and between four principal spheres: land, air, water, and life. Leverages key principles of environmental chemistry and ecology to unravel the intricate connectedness of natural phenomena and ecosystem function. Fundamental biological and chemical concepts are used to understand the science behind the environmental dilemmas facing societies as a consequence of human activities. Laboratory sessions consist of local field trips, laboratory experiments, group research, case study exercises, and discussions of current and classic scientific literature.

109. General Chemistry
Daniel Steffenson M 9:30 - 10:25, W 9:30 - 10:25, F 9:30 - 10:25
A one-semester introductory chemistry course. Introduction to models of atomic structure, chemical bonding, and intermolecular forces; characterization of chemical systems at equilibrium and spontaneous processes; the rates of chemical reactions; and special topics. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week. To ensure proper placement, students must take the chemistry placement examination and must be recommended for placement in Chemistry 109.

109. General Chemistry
Ronald Christensen M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25
A one-semester introductory chemistry course. Introduction to models of atomic structure, chemical bonding, and intermolecular forces; characterization of chemical systems at equilibrium and spontaneous processes; the rates of chemical reactions; and special topics. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week. To ensure proper placement, students must take the chemistry placement examination and must be recommended for placement in Chemistry 109.

226. Organic Chemistry II
Michael Danahy M 8:30 - 9:25, W 8:30 - 9:25, F 8:30 - 9:25
Continuation of the study of the compounds of carbon. Highlights the reactions of aromatic, carbonyl-containing, and amine functional groups. Mechanistic reasoning provides a basis for understanding these reactions. Skills for designing logical synthetic approaches to complex organic molecules are developed. Chemistry 225 and 226 cover the material of the usual course in organic chemistry and form a foundation for further work in organic chemistry and biochemistry. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week.

226. Organic Chemistry II
Richard Broene M 9:30 - 10:25, W 9:30 - 10:25, F 9:30 - 10:25
Continuation of the study of the compounds of carbon. Highlights the reactions of aromatic, carbonyl-containing, and amine functional groups. Mechanistic reasoning provides a basis for understanding these reactions. Skills for designing logical synthetic approaches to complex organic molecules are developed. Chemistry 225 and 226 cover the material of the usual course in organic chemistry and form a foundation for further work in organic chemistry and biochemistry. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week.

226. Organic Chemistry II
Benjamin Gorske M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25
Continuation of the study of the compounds of carbon. Highlights the reactions of aromatic, carbonyl-containing, and amine functional groups. Mechanistic reasoning provides a basis for understanding these reactions. Skills for designing logical synthetic approaches to complex organic molecules are developed. Chemistry 225 and 226 cover the material of the usual course in organic chemistry and form a foundation for further work in organic chemistry and biochemistry. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week.

240. Inorganic Chemistry
Jeffrey Nagle T 8:30 - 9:55, TH 8:30 - 9:55
An introduction to the chemistry of the elements with a focus on chemical bonding, periodic properties, and coordination compounds. Topics in solid state, bioinorganic, and environmental inorganic chemistry also are included. Provides a foundation for further work in chemistry and biochemistry. Lectures and four hours of laboratory work per week.

252. Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy
Ronald Christensen T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
Development and principles of quantum mechanics with applications to atomic structure, chemical bonding, chemical reactivity, and molecular spectroscopy. Lectures and four hours of laboratory work per week. Mathematics 181 is recommended.

263. Laboratory in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
Aimee Eldridge M 2:30 - 3:55
Comprehensive laboratory course in molecular biology and biochemistry that reflects how research is conducted and communicated. Includes sequential weekly experiments, resulting in a cohesive, semester-long research project. Begins with genetic engineering to produce a recombinant protein, continues with its purification, and finishes with functional and structural characterization. Emphasis is on cloning strategy, controlling protein expression, and protein characterization using techniques such as polymerase chain reaction, affinity chromatography, isoelectric focusing, and high-performance liquid chromatography. Students also learn to manipulate data using structural and image analysis software. Spring 2011 will be the last time Biology 263 (same as Chemistry 263) is offered.

306. Advanced Environmental Organic Chemistry
Dharanija Vasudevan T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55
Human activities result in the intentional or inadvertent release of organic chemicals into the natural environment. Interconnected physical, chemical, and biological processes influence the environmental fate of chemicals and the extent human and ecosystem exposure. Focuses on the thermodynamics and kinetics of chemical transformations in the natural environment via nucleophilic, redox, photolytic, and biological (microbial) reactions.

364. Macromolecular Structures
Aimee Eldridge W 6:30 - 9:25
An in-depth analysis of the biochemical properties of biologically important macromolecules such as proteins, DNA, and RNA. Special emphasis on the role structure plays in the biological function of macromolecules and on the methods for structure determination, NMR, and X-ray crystallography. Students will read and discuss the primary scientific literature, analyze macromolecular structures, and manipulate the data used to determine structures.