Spring 2009 Courses

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056. Investigations: The Chemistry of Forensic Science
Elizabeth Stemmler T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55
A study of scientific principles that underlie chemical, instrumental, and some biological techniques used in criminal investigations by forensic scientists. Focuses on understanding materials at an atomic or molecular level to learn how forensic chemistry is used to make qualitative and quantitative measurements key to forensic investigations. Makes use of case studies and the study of specific chemical, physical, and spectroscopic techniques used in forensic investigations. Presumes no background in science. Not open to students who have taken a college-level chemistry course. Students will take part in three to four laboratory experiences.

058. Drug Discovery
Danielle Dube T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
The process of drug discovery of medicinal compounds has evolved over millennia, from the shaman’s use of medicinal herbs to the highly-evolved techniques of rational design and high-throughput screening used by today’s pharmaceutical industry. Examines past and present approaches to drug discovery, with an emphasis on the natural world as a source of drugs, historical examples of drug discovery, and the experiments undertaken to validate a drug. Encourages students to take initial steps to identify novel therapeutics and to directly compare conventional versus herbal remedies in integrated laboratory exercises. Assumes no background in science.

105. Perspectives in Environmental Science
John Lichter T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
Functioning of the earth system is defined by the complex and fascinating interaction of processes within and between four principal spheres: land, air, water, and life. Leverages key principles of environmental chemistry and ecology to unravel the intricate connectedness of natural phenomena and ecosystem function. Fundamental biological and chemical concepts are used to understand the science behind the environmental dilemmas facing societies as a consequence of human activities. Laboratory sessions consist of local field trips, laboratory experiments, group research, case study exercises, and discussions of current and classic scientific literature.

109. General Chemistry
Laura Voss M 8:30 - 9:25, W 8:30 - 9:25, F 8:30 - 9:25
Introduction to models for chemical bonding and intermolecular forces; characterization of systems at equilibrium and spontaneous processes, including oxidation and reduction; and the rates of chemical reactions. Lectures, conferences, and four hours of laboratory work per week. To ensure proper placement, students must take the chemistry placement examination prior to registering for Chemistry 109.

109. General Chemistry
Ronald Christensen M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25
Introduction to models for chemical bonding and intermolecular forces; characterization of systems at equilibrium and spontaneous processes, including oxidation and reduction; and the rates of chemical reactions. Lectures, conferences, and four hours of laboratory work per week. To ensure proper placement, students must take the chemistry placement examination prior to registering for Chemistry 109.

109. General Chemistry
Elizabeth Stemmler M 11:30 - 12:25, W 11:30 - 12:25, F 11:30 - 12:25
Introduction to models for chemical bonding and intermolecular forces; characterization of systems at equilibrium and spontaneous processes, including oxidation and reduction; and the rates of chemical reactions. Lectures, conferences, and four hours of laboratory work per week. To ensure proper placement, students must take the chemistry placement examination prior to registering for Chemistry 109.

205. Environmental Chemistry
Dharni Vasudevan M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25
Focuses on two key processes that influence human and wildlife exposure to potentially harmful substances—chemical speciation and transformation. Equilibrium principles as applied to acid-base, complexation, precipitation, and dissolution reactions are used to explore organic and inorganic compound speciation in natural and polluted waters; quantitative approaches are emphasized. The kinetics and mechanisms of organic compound transformation via hydrolysis, oxidation, reduction, and photochemical reactions are examined; environmental conditions and chemical structural criteria that influence reactivity are emphasized. Weekly laboratory sections are concerned with the detection and quantification of organic and inorganic compounds in air, water, and soils/sediments.

226. Organic Chemistry II
Daniel O'Leary M 8:30 - 9:25, W 8:30 - 9:25, F 8:30 - 9:25
Continuation of the study of the compounds of carbon. Chemistry 225 and 226 cover the material of the usual course in organic chemistry and form a foundation for further work in organic chemistry and biochemistry. Lectures, conference, and four hours of laboratory work per week.

226. Organic Chemistry II
Jennifer Krumper M 9:30 - 10:25, W 9:30 - 10:25, F 9:30 - 10:25
Continuation of the study of the compounds of carbon. Chemistry 225 and 226 cover the material of the usual course in organic chemistry and form a foundation for further work in organic chemistry and biochemistry. Lectures, conference, and four hours of laboratory work per week.

231. Biochemistry and Cell Biology
Bruce Kohorn T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
Focuses on the structure and function of cells as we have come to know them through the interpretation of direct observations and experimental results. Emphasis is on the scientific (thought) processes that have allowed us to understand what we know today, emphasizing the use of genetic, biochemical, and optical analysis to understand fundamental biological processes. Covers details of the organization and expression of genetic information, and the biosynthesis, sorting, and function of cellular components within the cell. Concludes with examples of how cells perceive signals from other cells within cell populations, tissues, organisms, and the environment. Three hours of lab each week.

240. Inorganic Chemistry
Jeffrey Nagle M 9:30 - 10:25, W 9:30 - 10:25, F 9:30 - 10:25
An introduction to the chemistry of the elements with a focus on chemical bonding, periodic properties, and coordination compounds. Topics in solid state, bioinorganic, and environmental inorganic chemistry also are included. Provides a foundation for further work in chemistry and biochemistry. Lectures and four hours of laboratory work per week.

252. Physical Chemistry II
Ronald Christensen T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
Development and principles of quantum mechanics with applications to atomic structure, chemical bonding, chemical reactivity, and molecular spectroscopy. Lectures and four hours of laboratory work per week.

263. Laboratory in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
Kate Farnham M 2:30 - 3:55
Comprehensive laboratory course in molecular biology and biochemistry that reflects how research is conducted and communicated. Includes sequential weekly experiments, resulting in a cohesive, semester-long research project. Begins with genetic engineering to produce a recombinant protein, continues with its purification, and finishes with functional and structural characterization. Emphasis is on cloning strategy, controlling protein expression, and protein characterization using techniques such as polymerase chain reaction, affinity chromatography, isoelectric focusing, and high-performance liquid chromatography. Students also learn to manipulate data using structural and image analysis software.

325. Structure Determination in Organic Chemistry
Daniel O'Leary T 8:30 - 9:55, TH 8:30 - 9:55
Theory and applications of spectroscopic techniques useful for the determination of organic structures. Mass spectrometry and infrared, ultraviolet-visible, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy are discussed. Heavy emphasis is placed on applications of multiple-pulse, Fourier transform NMR spectroscopic techniques. Lectures and at least two hours of laboratory work per week.

350. Atmospheric Chemistry
Laura Voss M 1:30 - 2:25, W 1:30 - 2:25, F 1:30 - 2:25
In-depth study in the chemistry that affects atmospheric composition and global climate change. Topics include ozone depletion, tropospheric pollution, understanding past climates, and modern research techniques.