Fall 2013 Courses

  • Please note that for the 2013-14 academic year, official course numbers are now four digits. This page only shows the older three-digit course numbers. If you need to see both the old and the new numbers, consult the College Catalogue.
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  • Login to Blackboard. Instructional materials are available on a course-by-course basis.
011. Great Issues in Science
Daniel Steffenson M 9:30 - 10:25, W 9:30 - 10:25, F 9:30 - 10:25
Presents a realistic and mature picture of science and the methods employed by current scientists to provide acceptable justifications for scientific hypotheses and theories. Starting with the invention of science by the ancient Greek philosophers (Lucretius, On the Nature of Things) and using historical examples from various sciences, three philosophical models of justification examined in detail: logical empiricism (the Vienna Circle), Fallibilism (Popper), and Conventionalism (Kuhn). Several literary images of science (Vonnegut, Brecht, Pynchon, Crichton) are compared to the philosophical models. Examines the role of scientists in making certain value judgments such as organ transplants or stem cell research.
058. Drug Discovery
Danielle Dube M 9:30 - 10:25, W 9:30 - 10:25, F 9:30 - 10:25
The process of drug discovery of medicinal compounds has evolved over millennia, from the shaman’s use of medicinal herbs to the highly evolved techniques of rational design and high-throughput screening used by today’s pharmaceutical industry. Examines past and present approaches to drug discovery, with an emphasis on the natural world as a source of drugs, historical examples of drug discovery, and the experiments undertaken to validate a drug. Encourages students to take initial steps to identify novel therapeutics and to directly compare conventional versus herbal remedies in integrated laboratory exercises. Assumes no background in science. Not open to students who have credit for a chemistry course numbered 100 or higher.
059. Chemistry of Consumer Goods
Yi Jin Gorske T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
Natural and synthetic “chemicals” make up virtually everything we purchase and consume from breakfast cereals to soaps, shampoo bottles, and over-the-counter medications. Examines the chemical components of food, drugs, soaps, plastics, and other consumer goods we encounter daily. Explores scientific resources that can be used to obtain information on product components, safety, and regulations. Also considers topics related to some of the current safety concerns raised by chemicals found in common household items through case studies and research projects. Assumes no background in science. Not open to students who have credit for a chemistry course numbered 100 or higher.
101. Introductory Chemistry I
Michael Danahy M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25
The first course in a two-semester introductory college chemistry sequence. Introduction to the states of matter and their properties, stoichiometry and the mole unit, properties of gases, thermochemistry, atomic structure, and periodic properties of the elements. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week. To ensure proper placement, students must take the chemistry placement examination and must be recommended for placement in Chemistry 1101 {101}. Students continuing in chemistry will take Chemistry 1102 {102}, not Chemistry 1109 {109}, as their next chemistry course.
101. Introductory Chemistry I
Jeffrey Nagle T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55
The first course in a two-semester introductory college chemistry sequence. Introduction to the states of matter and their properties, stoichiometry and the mole unit, properties of gases, thermochemistry, atomic structure, and periodic properties of the elements. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week. To ensure proper placement, students must take the chemistry placement examination and must be recommended for placement in Chemistry 1101 {101}. Students continuing in chemistry will take Chemistry 1102 {102}, not Chemistry 1109 {109}, as their next chemistry course.
109. General Chemistry
Soren Eustis M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25
A one-semester introductory chemistry course. Introduction to models of atomic structure, chemical bonding, and intermolecular forces; characterization of chemical systems at equilibrium and spontaneous processes; the rates of chemical reactions; and special topics. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week. Students who have taken Chemistry 1102 {102} may not take Chemistry 1109 {109} for credit. To ensure proper placement, students must take the chemistry placement examination and must be recommended for placement in Chemistry 1109 {109}.
109. General Chemistry
David Griffith M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25
A one-semester introductory chemistry course. Introduction to models of atomic structure, chemical bonding, and intermolecular forces; characterization of chemical systems at equilibrium and spontaneous processes; the rates of chemical reactions; and special topics. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week. Students who have taken Chemistry 1102 {102} may not take Chemistry 1109 {109} for credit. To ensure proper placement, students must take the chemistry placement examination and must be recommended for placement in Chemistry 1109 {109}.
210. Chemical Analysis
Elizabeth Stemmler T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
Methods of separating and quantifying inorganic and organic compounds using volumetric, spectrophotometric, electrometric, and chromatographic techniques are covered. Chemical equilibria and the statistical analysis of data are addressed. Lectures and four hours of laboratory work per week.
225. Organic Chemistry I
Michael Danahy M 8:30 - 9:25, W 8:30 - 9:25, F 8:30 - 9:25
Introduction to the chemistry of the compounds of carbon. Describes bonding, conformations, and stereochemistry of small organic molecules. Reactions of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, and alcohols are discussed. Kinetic and thermodynamic data are used to formulate reaction mechanisms. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week.
225. Organic Chemistry I
Richard Broene M 9:30 - 10:25, W 9:30 - 10:25, F 9:30 - 10:25
Introduction to the chemistry of the compounds of carbon. Describes bonding, conformations, and stereochemistry of small organic molecules. Reactions of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, and alcohols are discussed. Kinetic and thermodynamic data are used to formulate reaction mechanisms. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week.
225. Organic Chemistry I
Yi Jin Gorske M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25
Introduction to the chemistry of the compounds of carbon. Describes bonding, conformations, and stereochemistry of small organic molecules. Reactions of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, and alcohols are discussed. Kinetic and thermodynamic data are used to formulate reaction mechanisms. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week.
251. Chemical Thermodynamics and Kinetics
Daniel Steffenson M 11:30 - 12:25, W 11:30 - 12:25, F 11:30 - 12:25
Thermodynamics and its application to chemical changes and equilibria that occur in the gaseous, solid, and liquid states. The behavior of systems at equilibrium and chemical kinetics are related to molecular properties by means of statistical mechanics and the laws of thermodynamics. Lectures and four hours of laboratory work per week. Mathematics 1800 {181} is recommended.
304. Advanced Environmental Chemistry
David Griffith T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55
Every year, 300 million tons of synthetic organic chemicals enter natural waters. This seminar examines the fate of organic contaminants in aquatic environments. We will use chemical structures and properties to predict contaminant partitioning, biodegradation, and transport, and evaluate the implications for human health and aquatic ecosystems. Case studies on endocrine disrupting chemicals, oil spills, and pharmaceuticals will allow us to critically examine inherent tensions between compound-specific chemical analyses and toxicity bioassays, between studies of single-compounds and complex mixtures, and between empirical and predictive approaches.
320. Advanced Organic Chemistry: Organometallic Chemistry
Richard Broene T 8:30 - 9:55, TH 8:30 - 9:55
In-depth study of compounds containing metal-carbon bonds and their reactions, with emphasis on synthesis and spectroscopy. A mechanistic approach is used to discover how these species act as catalylsts or intermediates in synthetic organic reactions. Special techniques for handling these often sensitve molecules are introduced.