Location: Bowdoin / Chemistry / Courses / Fall 2010

Chemistry

Fall 2010

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011. Great Issues in Science
Daniel Steffenson M  11:30 - 12:25
W  11:30 - 12:25
F  11:30 - 12:25

057. Chemistry of Poisons
Michael Danahy T  10:00 - 11:25
TH 10:00 - 11:25
An examination of the structure and biological function of selected poisons and toxins. Topics include investigating the three-dimensional structure of molecules, how structure and function are related, and the chemistry and policy decisions involved in labeling something a “poison.” Assumes no background in science. Not open to students who have credit for a chemistry course numbered 100 or higher.

101. Introductory Chemistry
Jeffrey Nagle M  10:30 - 11:25
W  10:30 - 11:25
F  10:30 - 11:25
A first course in a two-semester introductory college chemistry program. An introduction to the states of matter and their properties, the mole concept and stoichiometry, and selected properties of the elements. Lectures, conferences, and four hours of laboratory work per week. To ensure proper placement, students must take the chemistry placement examination prior to registering for Chemistry 101.

109. General Chemistry
Ronald Christensen M  10:30 - 11:25
W  10:30 - 11:25
F  10:30 - 11:25
Introduction to models of atomic structure, chemical bonding, and intermolecular forces; characterization of chemical systems at equilibrium and spontaneous processes; the rates of chemical reactions; and special topics. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week. To ensure proper placement, students must take the chemistry placement examination prior to registering for Chemistry 109.

210. Chemical Analysis
Elizabeth Stemmler M  11:30 - 12:25
W  11:30 - 12:25
F  11:30 - 12:25
Methods of separating and quantifying inorganic and organic compounds using volumetric, spectrophotometric, electrometric, and chromatographic techniques are covered. Chemical equilibria and the statistical analysis of data are addressed. Lectures and four hours of laboratory work per week.

225. Organic Chemistry I
Michael Danahy M  8:30 - 9:25
W  8:30 - 9:25
F  8:30 - 9:25
Introduction to the chemistry of the compounds of carbon. Describes bonding, conformations, and stereochemistry of small organic molecules. Reactions of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, and alcohols are discussed. Kinetic and thermodynamic data are used to formulate reaction mechanisms. Lectures, conference, and four hours of laboratory work per week.

225. Organic Chemistry I
Richard Broene M  9:30 - 10:25
W  9:30 - 10:25
F  9:30 - 10:25
Introduction to the chemistry of the compounds of carbon. Describes bonding, conformations, and stereochemistry of small organic molecules. Reactions of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, and alcohols are discussed. Kinetic and thermodynamic data are used to formulate reaction mechanisms. Lectures, conference, and four hours of laboratory work per week.

225. Organic Chemistry I
Benjamin Gorske M  10:30 - 11:25
W  10:30 - 11:25
F  10:30 - 11:25
Introduction to the chemistry of the compounds of carbon. Describes bonding, conformations, and stereochemistry of small organic molecules. Reactions of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, and alcohols are discussed. Kinetic and thermodynamic data are used to formulate reaction mechanisms. Lectures, conference, and four hours of laboratory work per week.

232. Biochemistry
Aimee Eldridge T  10:00 - 11:25
TH 10:00 - 11:25
Focuses on the chemistry of living organisms. Topics include structure, conformation, and properties of the major classes of biomolecules (proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and lipids); enzyme mechanisms, kinetics, and regulation; metabolic transformations; energetics and metabolic control.

251. Physical Chemistry I
Daniel Steffenson M  9:30 - 10:25
W  9:30 - 10:25
F  9:30 - 10:25
Thermodynamics and its application to chemical changes and equilibria that occur in the gaseous, solid, and liquid states. The behavior of systems at equilibrium and chemical kinetics are related to molecular properties by means of statistical mechanics and the laws of thermodynamics. Lectures and four hours of laboratory work per week. Mathematics 181 is recommended.

326. Advanced Topics in Organic Chemistry
Richard Broene T  2:30 - 3:55
TH 2:30 - 3:55
An in-depth coverage of classical synthetic and physical approaches to problem solving is discussed in terms of modern organic chemistry. Topics include molecular orbital theory, orbital symmetry, conformer analysis, stereochemistry, and synthesis. Instrumental techniques--NMR, IR, MS--and computational methods--molecular mechanics, semi-empirical and ab initio--for the determination of organic molecular structure are utilized extensively as part of a weekly laboratory program. Builds on the concepts learned in Chemistry 226.

340. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
Jeffrey Nagle T  8:30 - 9:55
TH 8:30 - 9:55
Inorganic chemistry is incredibly diverse and wide-ranging in scope. Symmetry, spectroscopy, and quantum-based theories and computational methods are employed to gain insight into the molecular and electronic structures and reaction mechanisms of inorganic compounds. Examples from the current literature emphasized, including topics in inorganic photochemistry and biochemistry. Chemistry 252 is recommended.