Location: Bowdoin / Chemistry / Courses / Fall 2008

Chemistry

Fall 2008

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101. Introductory Chemistry
Jeffrey Nagle M 9:30 - 10:25, W 9:30 - 10:25, F 9:30 - 10:25
A first course in a two-semester introductory college chemistry program. An introduction to the states of matter and their properties, the mole concept and stoichiometry, and selected properties of the elements. Lectures, conferences, and four hours of laboratory work per week. To ensure proper placement, students are expected to have taken the chemistry placement examination prior to registering for Chemistry 101.

109. General Chemistry
Ronald Christensen M 9:30 - 10:25, W 9:30 - 10:25, F 9:30 - 10:25
Introduction to models for chemical bonding and intermolecular forces; characterization of systems at equilibrium and spontaneous processes, including oxidation and reduction; and the rates of chemical reactions. Lectures, conferences, and four hours of laboratory work per week. To ensure proper placement, students are expected to have taken the chemistry placement examination prior to registering for Chemistry 109.

210. Quantitative Analysis
Elizabeth Stemmler M 11:30 - 12:25, W 11:30 - 12:25, F 11:30 - 12:25
Methods of separating and quantifying inorganic and organic compounds using volumetric, spectrophotometric, electrometric, and chromatographic techniques are covered. Chemical equilibria and the statistical analysis of data are addressed. Lectures and four hours of laboratory work per week.

225. Organic Chemistry I
Richard Broene M 9:30 - 10:25, W 9:30 - 10:25, F 9:30 - 10:25
Introduction to the chemistry of the compounds of carbon. Provides the foundation for further work in organic chemistry and biochemistry. Lectures, conference, and four hours of laboratory work per week.

225. Organic Chemistry I
Richard Broene M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25
Introduction to the chemistry of the compounds of carbon. Provides the foundation for further work in organic chemistry and biochemistry. Lectures, conference, and four hours of laboratory work per week.

232. Biochemistry
Danielle Dube T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
Focuses on the chemistry of living organisms. Topics include structure, conformation, and properties of the major classes of biomolecules (proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and lipids); enzyme mechanisms, kinetics, and regulation; metabolic transformations; energetics and metabolic control.

251. Physical Chemistry I
Laura Voss M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25
Thermodynamics and its application to chemical changes and equilibria that occur in the gaseous, solid, and liquid states. The behavior of systems at equilibrium and chemical reaction kinetics are related to molecular properties by means of the kinetic theory of gases, the laws of thermodynamics, and transition state theory.

331. Chemical Biology
Danielle Dube T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55
The power of organic synthesis has had a tremendous impact on our understanding of biological systems. Examines case studies in which synthetically derived small molecules have been used as tools to tease out answers to questions of biological significance. Topics include synthetic strategies that have been used to make derivatives of the major classes of biomolecules (nucleic acids, proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids), and the experimental breakthroughs these molecules have enabled (e.g., polymerase-chain reaction, DNA sequencing, microarray technology). Emphasis is on current literature, experimental design, and critical review of manuscripts.

340. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
Jeffrey Nagle T 8:30 - 9:55, TH 8:30 - 9:55
An in-depth coverage of inorganic chemistry. Spectroscopic and mechanistic studies of coordination and organometallic compounds, including applications to bioinorganic chemistry, are emphasized. Symmetry and applications of group theory are included.