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The College Catalogue

Russian – Courses

First-Year Seminars

For a full description of first-year seminars, see the First-Year Seminar section.

1022 {22} c. “It Happens Rarely, Maybe, but It Does Happen”—Fantasy and Satire in Russia and East Central Europe. Every other fall. Fall 2014. Kristina Toland.

Courses in Russian for Majors and Minors

1101 {101} c. Elementary Russian I. Every fall. Fall 2014. Michael Klimov.

Emphasis on the acquisition of language skills through imitation and repetition of basic language patterns, multimedia material (seeing and making short film clips), the development of facility in speaking through interactive dialogues, and understanding simple Russian. Conversation hour with native speaker.

1102 {102} c. Elementary Russian II. Every spring. Spring 2015. Michael Klimov.

Continuation of Russian 1101 {101}. Emphasis on the acquisition of language skills through imitation and repetition of basic language patterns, multimedia material (seeing and making short film clips), the development of facility in speaking through interactive dialogues, and understanding simple Russian. Conversation hour with native speaker.

Prerequisite: Russian 1101 {101} or permission of the instructor.

2203 {203} c. Intermediate Russian I. Every fall. Fall 2014. Michael Klimov.

A continuation of Russian 1101 {101} and 1102 {102}. Emphasis on maintaining and improving the student’s facility in speaking and understanding normal conversational Russian. Writing and reading skills are also stressed. Conversation hour with native speaker.

Prerequisite: Russian 1102 {102} or permission of the instructor.

2204 {204} c. Intermediate Russian II. Every spring. Spring 2015. Michael Klimov.

A continuation of Russian 2203 {203}. Emphasis on maintaining and improving the student’s facility in speaking and understanding normal conversational Russian. Writing and reading skills are also stressed. Conversation hour with native speaker.

Prerequisite: Russian 2203 {203} or permission of the instructor.

2970–2973 {291–294} c. Intermediate Independent Study in Russian. The Department.

Prerequisite: Russian 3055 {305} and permission of the instructor.

2999 {299} c. Intermediate Collaborative Study in Russian. The Department.

Upon demand, this course may be conducted as a small seminar for several students in areas not covered in the above courses (e.g., the Russian media or intensive language study).

Prerequisite: Russian 3055 {305} and permission of the instructor.

3055 {305} c. Advanced Reading and Composition in Russian. Fall 2014. Michael Klimov.

Intended to develop the ability to read Russian at a sophisticated level by combining selected language and literature readings, grammar review, and study of Russian word formation. Discussion and reports in Russian. Conversation hour with native speaker.

Prerequisite: Russian 2204 {204} or permission of the instructor.

3077 {307} c. Russian Folk Culture. Every other year. Spring 2016.

A study of Russian folk culture: folk tales, fairy tales, legends, and traditional oral verse, as well as the development of folk motives in the work of modern writers. Special emphasis on Indo-European and Common Slavic background. Reading and discussion in Russian. Short papers.

Prerequisite: Russian 3055 {305} or permission of the instructor.

[3099 {309} c. Nineteenth-Century Russian Literature.]

3100 {310} c. Modern Russian Literature. Spring 2015. Kristina Toland.

An introduction to twentieth-century Russian literature from Symbolism to Postmodernism. Reading of poetry by Blok, Akhmatova, Mayakovsky, Evtushenko, and Okudzhava, along with short prose by Zamiatin, Babel, Zoshchenko, Kharms, Shalamov, Aksenov, Shukshin, Petrushevskaya, Tolstaya, Ulitskaya, Sadur, and Pelevin. Close readings of the assigned works are viewed alongside other artistic texts and cultural phenomena, including the bard song, film, conceptual and sots-art, and rock and pop music.

Prerequisite: Russian 3055 {305} or permission of the instructor.

3166 {316} c. Russian Poetry. Spring 2016. The Department.

Examines various nineteenth- and twentieth-century Russian poets, including Pushkin, Lermontov, Blok, and Mayakovsky. Earlier history of Russian verse is also discussed. Includes study of Russian poetics and the cultural-historical context of each poet’s work. Reading and discussion are in Russian. Short papers.

Prerequisite: Russian 3055 {305} or permission of the instructor.

4000–4003 {401–404} c. Advanced Independent Study in Russian. The Department.

Individual research in Russian studies. Major sources should be read in Russian. A two-semester project is necessary for honors in Russian.

Prerequisite: One course in Russian higher than 3055 {305} and permission of the instructor.

4029 {405} c. Advanced Collaborative Study in Russian. The Department.

Prerequisite: One course in Russian higher than 3055 {305} and permission of the instructor.

4050–4051 c. Honors Project in Russian. The Department.

In English Translation

[2216 {216} c - IP. Birth of the Modern: Romanticism in East-Central Europe, 1790–1848.]

2218 {218} c - IP, VPA. Smashing the Fourth Wall: Russian Theater Arts in the Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries. Spring 2015. Kristina Toland.

Studies elements of the twentieth- and twenty-first-century Russian and Soviet theater by analyzing the works of canonical writers and important contemporary authors and by considering a range of theatrical ideas and conventions. Highlights various aspects of theater production in relation to the texts read in class in order to clarify the specific purposes of play-writing as a form of fiction presented in performance. Significant emphasis is placed on the study of visual culture as the essential contributing factor in the development of theater arts. Students read plays, watch performances, and examine visual artworks related to stage production. Authors to be read may include Anton Chekhov, Alexander Block, Vladimir Mayakovsky, Nikolai Erdman, Mikhail Bulgakov, Daniil Kharms, Alexandr Vampilov, Liudmila Petryshevskaya, Olga Mukhina, and others. Texts by Vsevolod Meyerhold, Konstantin Stanislavsky, Nikolai Evreinov, and other theater practitioners, theoreticians, and critics are read as well. (Same as Theater 2868 {218}.)

[2219 {219} c - IP. Of Men and Monsters: Humanity versus Technology in Modern and Post-Modern Russian Literature.]

2220 {220} c - IP. Nineteenth-Century Russian Literature. Spring 2016. The Department.

Traces the development of Russian realism and the Russian novel in the context of contemporary intellectual history. Specific topics include the Russian response to Romanticism, the rejection of Romanticism in favor of the “realistic” exposure of Russia’s social ills, Russian nationalism and literary Orientalism, the portrayal of women and their role in Russian society, and the reflection of contemporary political controversies in Russian writing. Authors include Pushkin, Gogol’, Lermontov, Belinsky, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, and Tolstoy. Russian majors are required to do some reading in Russian.

2221 {221} c - IP, VPA. Soviet Worker Bees, Revolution, and Red Love in Russian Film. Fall 2014. Kristina Toland.

An interdisciplinary examination of Russian culture surveying the development of literary and visual arts from the 1900s through 2010s. Focuses on the themes of the individual vis-à-vis society and on gender politics, using literary and cinematic texts. Topics include “the woman question” in Russia, scientific utopias, eternal revolution, individual freedom versus collectivism, conflict between the intelligentsia and the common man, the “new Soviet woman,” nationalism, the thaw, stagnation of the 1970s, sexual liberation, and the search for post-Soviet identity. Explores the evolution of literary genres (short story and novella) and film techniques in relation to socio-political and cultural developments, paying particular attention to questions of the interrelationship between arts, audience and critic, and the politics of form. Weekly film viewings. Note: Fulfills the film theory requirement for Cinema Studies minors. (Same as Film Studies 2221 and Gender and Women’s Studies 2510 {220}.)

2223 {223} c. Dostoevsky and the Novel. Spring 2015. The Department.

Examines Fyodor Dostoevsky’s later novels. Studies the author’s unique brand of realism (“fantastic realism,” “realism of a higher order”), which explores the depths of human psychology and spirituality. Emphasis on the anti-Western, anti-materialist bias of Dostoevsky’s quest for meaning in a world growing increasingly unstable, violent, and cynical. Special attention is given to the author’s treatment of urban poverty and the place of women in Russian society. (Same as Gender and Women’s Studies 2221 {221}.)

2225 c - IP. Lev Tolstoy, His Life and Work. Spring 2014. Kristina Toland.

Introduces the important works of Lev Tolstoy. Focuses on the artistic, moral, and philosophical concerns of the author within the context of his select short stories and novels, as well as theoretical, religious, and political texts. By focusing on autobiographical themes traced from his fictionalized autobiography Childhood through A Confession, examines the interconnectedness of the life and art of one of the greatest novelists in the Russian literary canon. All course content is in English.


Online Catalogue content is current as of August 1, 2014. For most current course information, use the online course finder. Also see Addenda.