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The College Catalogue

Romance Languages – Spanish Courses

1101 {101} c. Elementary Spanish I. Every fall. Fall 2013. María Báez Marco.

An introduction to the grammar of Spanish, aiming at comprehension, reading, writing, and simple conversation. Emphasis is on grammar structure, with frequent oral drills. Spanish 1101 {101} is primarily open to first- and second-year students, with a limited number of spaces available for juniors and seniors who have had less than one year of high school Spanish.

1102 {102} c. Elementary Spanish II. Every spring. Spring 2014. Margaret Boyle.

Three class hours per week and weekly conversation sessions with assistant, plus laboratory assignments. An introduction to the grammar of Spanish, aiming at comprehension, reading, writing, and simple conversation. More attention is paid to reading and writing.

Prerequisite: Spanish 1101 {101} or the equivalent.

2203 {203} c. Intermediate Spanish I. Every fall. Fall 2013. Elena Cueto Asín and Carolyn Wolfenzon.

Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with the teaching assistant. Grammar fundamentals are reviewed. Class conversation and written assignments are based on readings in modern literature.

Prerequisite: Spanish 1102 {102} or placement in Spanish 2203.

2204 {204} c. Intermediate Spanish II. Fall 2013. Gustavo Faverón Patriau. Spring 2014. María Báez Marco.

Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with the assistant. Grammar fundamentals are reviewed. Class conversation and written assignments are based on readings in modern literature.

Prerequisite: Spanish 2203 {203} or placement in Spanish 2204.

2305 {205} c. Advanced Spanish. Every semester. Fall 2013. María Báez Marco, Margaret Boyle, and Enrique Yepes. Spring 2014. Nadia V. Celis and Elena Cueto Asín.

The study of topics in the political and cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world in the twentieth century, together with an advanced grammar review. Covers a variety of texts and media and is designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the intellectual and artistic traditions of Spain and Latin America. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant. (Same as Latin American Studies 2205 {205}.)

Prerequisite: Spanish 2204 {204} or placement in Spanish 2305.

2409 {209} c - IP. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Poetry and Theater. Every semester. Fall 2013. Elena Cueto Asín. Spring 2014. Margaret Boyle and Enrique Yepes.

A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of poetry and theater. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context. One weekly workshop with assistant in addition to class time. Conducted in Spanish. (Same as Latin American Studies 2409 {209}.)

Prerequisite: Spanish 2305 {205} (same as Latin American Studies 2205 {205}) or permission of the instructor.

2410 {210} c - IP. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Essay and Narrative. Every semester. Fall 2013. Nadia V. Celis and Carolyn Wolfenzon. Spring 2014. Nadia V. Celis.

A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of essay and narrative. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context. (Same as Latin American Studies 2410 {210}.)

Prerequisite: Spanish 2305 {205} (same as Latin American Studies 2205 {205}) or permission of the instructor.

2505 {250} c - ESD. The Making of a Race: Latino Fictions. Fall 2013. Nadia V. Celis.

Explores the creation, representation, and marketing of U.S. Latino/a identities in American literature and popular culture from the 1960s. Focuses on the experience of artists and writers of Puerto Rican, Cuban, and Dominican origin; their negotiations with notions of race, class, gender, and sexuality in the United States; and their role in the struggle for social rights, in cultural translation, and in the marketing of ethnic identities, as portrayed in a variety of works ranging from movies and songs to poetry and narrative. Authors include Pietri, Blades, Álvarez, Hijuelos, Braschi, Ovejas, Díaz, and Quiñones. Readings and writing in English, discussions in Spanish. Spanish speaking skills required. (Same as English 2570 {250} and Latin American Studies 2005 {250}.)

3000–3099 {301–309}. Topics in Hispanic Cultures. Every year. The Department.

Designed to provide advanced students with an understanding of cultural developments and debates in specific regions of the Spanish-speaking world. Conducted in Spanish.

3001 {301} c. Contemporary Spain. Spring 2014. Elena Cueto Asín.

A study of contemporary Spain through the analysis of a wide array of texts (essay, press, film, advertisement, music, etc.), aimed at understanding the complexities of a society and culture as determined by geographical, linguistic, and ethnic diversity, and by forces of history and tradition vis-à-vis modernity and political change. Conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisite: Spanish 2409 {209} (same as Latin American Studies 2409 {209}) or 2410 {210} (same as Latin American Studies 2410 {210}).

[3004 {304} c. Dress and Body Politics in Latin America. (Same as Latin American Studies 3204 {304}.)]

3005 {305} c - ESD. The Making of a Race: Latino Fictions. Fall 2013. Nadia V. Celis.

Explores the creation, representation, and marketing of U.S. Latino/a identities in American literature and popular culture from the 1960s. Focuses on the experience of artists and writers of Puerto Rican, Cuban, and Dominican origin; their negotiations with notions of race, class, gender, and sexuality in the United States; and their role in the struggle for social rights, in cultural translation, and in the marketing of ethnic identities, as portrayed in a variety of works ranging from movies and songs to poetry and narrative. Authors include Pietri, Blades, Álvarez, Hijuelos, Braschi, Ovejas, Díaz, and Quiñones. Readings in English, discussions and writing in Spanish. (Same as English 2571 {221} and Latin American Studies 3005 {305}.)

Prerequisite: Spanish 2409 {209} (same as Latin American Studies 2409 {209}) or 2410 {210} (same as Latin American Studies 2410 {210}).

3100-3999 {310–349}. Topics in Hispanic Literary and Cultural Studies. Every year. The Department.

Designed to provide advanced students with the opportunity to deepen the study of specific aspects of the cultural production from the Spanish-speaking world with particular emphasis on literary analysis. Conducted in Spanish.

[3117 {317} c. Almodóvar, Before and After: Reading Spanish Film.]

[3127 {327} c. Reading Spanish Film.]

[3201 {321} c. Andean Modernities. (Same as Latin American Studies 3201 {330}.)]

[3218 {318} c. A Journey around Macondo: García Márquez and His Contemporaries. (Same as Latin American Studies 3218 {318}.]

[3220 {320} c. Beyond the Postcard: The Hispanic Caribbean. (Same as Africana Studies 3320 {320} and Latin American Studies 3220 {320}.)]

[3224 {324} c. Twentieth-Century Spanish Theater.]

[3229 {329} c. Short Cuts: The Latin American Nouvelle. (Same as Latin American Studies 3229 {329}.)]

[3236 {336} c. Reading Images: Intersections of Art, Film, and Literature in Contemporary Latin America. (Same as Latin American Studies 3236 {336}.)]

3237 {337} c. Hispanic Short Story. Fall 2013. Gustavo Faverón Patriau.

An investigation of the short story as a literary genre, beginning in the nineteenth century, involving discussion of its aesthetics, as well as its political, social, and cultural ramifications in the Spanish-speaking world. Authors include Pardo Bazán, Echevarría, Borges, Cortázar, García Márquez, Ferré, and others. (Same as Latin American Studies 3237 {337}.)

Prerequisite: Two of the following: Spanish 2409 {209} (same as Latin American Studies 2409 {209}), 2410 {210} (same as Latin American Studies 2410 {210}), 3200 {310} or higher; or permission of the instructor.

[3243 {343} c. Imaginary Cities/Real Cities in Latin America. (Same as Latin American Studies 3243 {343}.)]

[3244 {344} c. Bad Girls on Stage in Early Modern Spain and Spanish America. (Same as Gender and Women’s Studies 3001 {344} and Latin American Studies 3244 {344}.)]

3245 {345} c. Ecological Thought in Latin American Literature. Fall 2013. Enrique Yepes.

Explores how the radical interconnectedness postulated by ecological thinking can be read in Latin American narrative, essay, film, and poetry from the 1920s to the present. Includes a review of cultural ecology as well as an overview of environmental history and activism in the region. (Same as Environmental Studies 2485 {285} and Latin American Studies 3245 {345}.)]

Prerequisite: Two of the following: Spanish 2409 {209} (same as Latin American Studies 2409 {209}), 2410 {210} (same as Latin American Studies 2410 {210}), 3200 {310} or higher; or permission of the instructor.

3246 {346} c. Dressing and Undressing in Early Modern Spain. Fall 2013. Margaret Boyle.

Focuses on the literal and metaphorical practices of “dressing” and “undressing” as
depicted in the literature of Early Modern Spain. Considers how these practices relate to the (de)construction of Gender and Empire throughout the period. What does dress have to do with identity and power? What might nakedness reveal about ideal and defective bodies? These questions will be enriched through exploration of a series of images in collaboration with the Bowdoin College Museum of Art. Authors considered during the semester include Fernando de Rojas, Miguel de Cervantes, María de Zayas, Teresa de Jesús, Tirso de Molina, and Ana Caro. (Same as Gender and Women’s Studies 3316 {316}.)

Prerequisite: Two of the following: Spanish 2409 {209} (same as Latin American Studies 2409 {209}), 2410 {210} (same as Latin American Studies 2410 {210}), 3200 {310} or higher; or permission of the instructor.

[3247 {347} c. Translating Cultures. (Same as Latin American Studies 3247 {347}.)]

4000–4003 {401–404} c. Independent Study in Spanish. The Department.

4029 {405} c. Collaborative Study in Spanish. The Department.

4050–4051 c. Honors Project in Spanish. The Department.

Online Catalogue content is current as of August 1, 2013. For most current course information, use the online course finder. Also see Addenda.