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The College Catalogue

Romance Languages – Italian Courses

1101 {101} c. Elementary Italian I. Every fall. Fall 2013. Allison Cooper, Davida Gavioli, and Anna Rein.

Three class hours per week, plus weekly drill sessions and language laboratory assignments. Study of the basic forms, structures, and vocabulary. Emphasis is on listening comprehension and spoken Italian.

1102 {102} c. Elementary Italian II. Every spring. Spring 2014. Anna Rein.

Continuation of Italian 1101 {101}. Three class hours per week, plus weekly drill sessions and language laboratory assignments. Study of the basic forms, structures, and vocabulary. More attention is paid to reading and writing.

Prerequisite: Italian 1101 {101} or the equivalent.

1103 {103} c. Accelerated Elementary Italian. Spring 2014. Arielle Saiber.

Three class hours per week, plus one hour of weekly drill and conversation sessions with a teaching fellow. Covers in one semester what is covered in two semesters in the 1101–1102 {101–102} sequence. Study of the basic forms, structures, and vocabulary. Emphasis on listening comprehension and spoken Italian. For students with an advanced knowledge of a Romance language or by permission of instructor.

Prerequisite: Placement into French 2305 {205} or higher, or Spanish 2305 {205} or higher, or permission of the instructor.

2203 {203} c. Intermediate Italian I. Every fall. Fall 2013. Davida Gavioli.

Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant. Aims to increase fluency in both spoken and written Italian. Grammar fundamentals are reviewed. Class conversation and written assignments are based on contemporary texts of literary and social interest.

Prerequisite: Italian 1102 {102} or placement in Italian 2203.

2204 {204} c. Intermediate Italian II. Every spring. Spring 2014. Arielle Saiber.

Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant. Aims to increase fluency in both spoken and written Italian. Grammar fundamentals are reviewed. Class conversation and written assignments are based on contemporary texts of literary and social interest.

Prerequisite: Italian 2203 {203} or placement in Italian 2204.

2305 {205} c. Advanced Italian I. Every fall. Fall 2013. Arielle Saiber.

Strengthens fluency in reading, writing, and speaking through an introduction to contemporary Italian society and culture. An advanced grammar review is paired with a variety of journalistic and literary texts, visual media, and a novel. Conducted in Italian.

Prerequisite: Italian 2204 {204} or placement in Italian 2305.

2408 {208} c - IP. Introduction to Contemporary Italy: Dalla Marcia alla Vespa. Spring 2014. Davida Gavioli.

In the recent past, Italy has experienced violent political, economic, and cultural changes. In short succession, it experienced Fascist dictatorship, the Second World War, the Holocaust, and Civil War; a passage from Monarchy to Republic; and a transformation from a peasant existence to an industrialized society, giving rise to a revolution in cinema, fashion, and transportation. How did all this happen? Who were the people behind these events? What effect did they have on everyday life? Answers these questions, exploring the history and the culture of Italy from Fascism to contemporary Italy, passing through the economic boom, the “Years of Lead,” and the Mafia. Students have the opportunity to “relive” the events of the twentieth century, assuming the identity of real-life men and women. Along with historical and cultural information, students read newspaper articles, letters, excerpts from novels and short stories from authors such as Calvino, Levi, Ginzburg, and others, and see films by directors such as Scola, Taviani, De Sica, and Giordana.

Prerequisite: Italian 2305 {205} or permission of the instructor.

[2525 {225} c - IP. Italians at Sea: Exploration, Love, and Disaster from the Mediterranean to the Seven Seas. (Same as Environmental Studies 2480 {248}.)]

2553 c. Italy’s Cinema of Social Engagement. Spring 2014. Allison Cooper.

An introduction to Italian cinema with an emphasis on Neorealism and its relationship to other genres, including Comedy Italian Style, the Spaghetti Western, the horror film, the “mondo” (shock documentary), and mafia movies, among others. Readings and discussions situate films within their social and historical contexts, and explore contemporary critical debates about the place of radical politics in Italian cinema (a hallmark of Neorealism), the division between art films and popular cinema, and the relevance of the concept of an Italian national cinema in an increasingly globalized world. No prerequisite required. Taught in English (films screened in Italian with English subtitles). (Same as Film Studies 2553 {253}.)

3009 {309} c. Introduction to the Study and Criticism of Medieval and Early Modern Italian Literature. Fall 2013. Arielle Saiber.

An introduction to the literary tradition of Italy from the Middle Ages through the early Baroque period. Focus on major authors and literary movements in their historical and cultural contexts. Conducted in Italian.

Prerequisite: Italian 2305 {205} or permission of the instructor.

[3010 {310} c. Women of Invention: Contemporary Women’s Writing in Italian.]

3016 {316} c. Red, White, Green and . . . Noir: Reading Italy through Crime Fiction. Spring 2014. Davida Gavioli.

Examines the genre of the Italian “Giallo” and its importance in contemporary Italian fiction. Considers critical approaches to the genre and addresses specific theoretical and cultural issues in the context of modern Italy, with specific focus on the cultural/geographic context that so thoroughly informs the “Giallo.” Examines the style and the formal and thematic choices of authors such as Sciascia, Scerbanenco, Macchiavelli, Lucarelli, Carlotto, and Camilleri.

Prerequisite: Italian 2408 {208} or permission of the instructor.

[3018 {318} c. From Rimini to Gomorra: Times of Renewal in Contemporary Italian Literature.]

[3020 {320} c. Dante’s Commedia.]

[3207 {327} c - IP. Italians at Sea: Exploration, Love, and Disaster from the Mediterranean to the Seven Seas.]

4000–4003 {401–404} c. Independent Study in Italian. The Department.

4029 {405} c. Collaborative Study in Italian. The Department.

Online Catalogue content is current as of August 1, 2013. For most current course information, use the online course finder. Also see Addenda.