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The College Catalogue

Romance Languages – French Courses

Introductory, Intermediate, and Advanced Courses

1101 {101} c. Elementary French I. Every fall. Fall 2014. Erin Curren.

A study of the basic forms, structures, and vocabulary in the context of the French-speaking world. Emphasis on the four communicative skills: reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with teaching assistants. Primarily open to first- and second-year students.

1102 {102} c. Elementary French II. Every spring. Spring 2015. Erin Curren.

A study of the basic forms, structures, and vocabulary in the context of the French-speaking world. Emphasis on the four communicative skills: reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with French teaching fellows.

Prerequisite: French 1101 {101} or the equivalent.

2203 {203} c. Intermediate French I. Every fall. Fall 2014. Erin Curren.

Vocabulary development and review of basic grammar, which are integrated into more complex patterns of written and spoken French. Active use of French in class discussions and conversation sessions with French teaching fellows. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session.

Prerequisite: French 1102 {102} or placement in French 2203.

2204 {204} c. Intermediate French II. Every spring. Spring 2015. Erin Curren.

Continued development of oral and written skills; course focus shifts from grammar to reading. Short readings form the basis for the expansion of vocabulary and analytical skills. Active use of French in class discussions and conversation sessions with French teaching fellows. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session.

Prerequisite: French 2203 {203} or placement in French 2204.

2305 {205} c. Advanced French through Film. Every fall. Fall 2014. Charlotte Daniels and Katherine Dauge-Roth.

An introduction to film analysis. Conversation and composition based on a variety of contemporary films from French-speaking regions.Grammar review and frequent short papers. Emphasis on student participation, including a variety of oral activities. Three hours per week plus regular viewing sessions for films and a weekly conversation session with French teaching fellows.

Prerequisite: French 2204 {204} or placement in French 2305.

2407 {207} c - ESD, IP. Francophone Cultures. Every fall. Fall 2014. Hanétha Vété-Congolo.

An introduction to the cultures of various French-speaking regions outside of France. Examines the history, politics, customs, cinema, and the arts of the Francophone world, principally Africa and the Caribbean. Increases cultural understanding prior to study abroad in French-speaking regions. (Same as Africana Studies 2407 {207} and Latin American Studies 2407 {206}.)

Prerequisite: French 2305 {205} or higher, placement in French 2400 level, or permission of the instructor.

2408 {208} c - ESD, IP. Contemporary France through the Media. Every spring. Spring 2015. Charlotte Daniels and Katherine Dauge-Roth.

An introduction to contemporary France through newspapers, magazines, television, music, and film. Emphasis is on enhancing communicative proficiency in French and increasing cultural understanding prior to study abroad in France.

Prerequisite: French 2305 {205} or higher, placement in French 2400 level, or permission of the instructor.

2409 {209} c - IP. Introduction to the Study and Criticism of Medieval and Early Modern French Literature. Every fall. Fall 2014. Katherine Dauge-Roth.

Introduces students to the literary traditions of France from the Middle Ages to the French Revolution. Students are introduced to major authors and literary movements in their cultural and historical contexts.

Prerequisite: French 2305 {205} or higher, placement in French 2400 level, or permission of the instructor.

2410 {210} c - IP. Introduction to the Study and Criticism of Modern French Literature. Every spring. Spring 2015. Charlotte Daniels.

Introduces students to the literary traditions of France from 1789 to the present. Focuses on major authors and literary movements in historical and cultural context.

Prerequisite: French 2305 {205} or higher, placement in French 2400 level, or permission of the instructor.

2411 {211} c - ESD, IP. Introduction to the Study and Criticism of Francophone Literature. Every spring. Spring 2015. Hanétha Vété-Congolo.

Introduces students to the literary tradition of the Francophone world. Focuses on major authors and literary movements in historical and cultural context. (Same as Africana Studies 2411 {209} and Latin American Studies 2211 {213}.)

Prerequisite: French 2305 {205} or higher, placement in French 2400 level, or permission of the instructor.

3000–3999 {309–329}. Topics in French and Francophone Literature. Every year. The Department.

Designed to provide students who have a basic knowledge of literature in French the opportunity to study more closely an author, a genre, or a period.

[3203 {323} c. Murder, Mystery, and Mayhem: The fait divers in French Literature and Film.]

[3206 {326} c. Body Language: Writing Corporeality in France.]

3207 {327} c. Love, Letters, and Lies. Fall 2014. Charlotte Daniels.

A study of memoir novels, epistolary novels (letters), and autobiography. What does writing have to do with love and desire? What is the role of others in the seemingly personal act of “self-expression?” What is the truth value of writing that circulates in the absence of its author? These and other related issues are explored in the works of the most popular writers of eighteenth-century France: Prévost, Graffigny, Laclos, and Rousseau. Conducted in French.

Prerequisite: Two of the following: French 2407 {207} (same as Africana Studies 2407 {207} and Latin American Studies 2407 {206}) or 2408 {208}; French 2409 {209}, 2410 {210}, or 2411 {211}; one course numbered 3000–3999 {300–399} in French; or permission of the instructor.

[3208 {328} c. Wanderings and Displacements: Shifting Identities in Nineteenth-Century French Literature.]

[3210 {325} c. Witches, Monsters, and Demons: Representing the Occult in Early Modern France.]

[3211 c. Bringing the Female Maroon to Memory: Female Marronage and Douboutism in the Caribbean.]

French 3212 c. Eyes on the Prize: Promoting French Culture in the Age of the New Millennium. Fall 2014. Hanétha Vété-Congolo.

Since the eighteenth century, France has developed a seemingly endless list of literary prizes, the Prix Goncourt being the most famous. Each prize represents an official consecration meant to underline the writer’s unquestionable worth, but with over 3,000 literary prizes awarded each year, one wonders if it is really the best writings that are acknowledged? In recent years, scandals have erupted, with accusations of influence peddling by publishers. What does this teach us about French culture and society? What is the relation between literary prizes and the promotion of French culture more broadly? In the context of globalization, what political statement is being made? Immigration has considerably changed the face of France. How does the culture of literary prizes take this into account? Students read four recent prizewinners, each of which created controversy that directly addresses the questions above. Primary readings include works by Houellbecq, Le Clezio, Paule Constant, and Alain Mabanckou.

Prerequisite: Two of the following: French 2407 {207} (same as Africana Studies 2407 {207} and Latin American Studies 2407 {206}) or 2408 {208}; French 2409 {209}, 2410 {210}, or 2411 {211}; one course numbered 3000–3999 {300–399} in French; or permission of the instructor.

4000–4003 {401–404} c. Independent Study in French. The Department.

4029 {405} c. Collaborative Study in French. The Department.

4050–4051 c. Honors Project in French. The Department.


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