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The College Catalogue

Romance Languages – French Courses

Introductory, Intermediate, and Advanced Courses

1101 {101} c. Elementary French I. Every fall. Fall 2013. Erin Curren.

A study of the basic forms, structures, and vocabulary. Emphasis on listening comprehension and spoken French. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant. Primarily open to first- and second-year students who have had two years or less of high school French. A limited number of spaces are available for juniors and seniors.

1102 {102} c. Elementary French II. Every spring. Spring 2014. Katherine Dauge-Roth.

A continuation of French 1101 {101}. A study of the basic forms, structures, and vocabulary. Emphasis on listening comprehension and spoken French. During the second semester, more stress is placed on reading and writing. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.

Prerequisite: French 1101 {101} or the equivalent.

2203 {203} c. Intermediate French I. Every fall. Fall 2013. Jay Ketner and Hanétha Vété-Congolo.

A review of basic grammar, which is integrated into more complex patterns of written and spoken French. Short compositions and class discussions require active use of students’ acquired knowledge of French. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with teaching fellow.

Prerequisite: French 1102 {102} or placement in French 2203.

2204 {204} c. Intermediate French II. Every spring. Spring 2014. Charlotte Daniels.

Continued development of oral and written skills; course focus shifts from grammar to reading. Short readings from French literature form the basis for the expansion of vocabulary and analytical skills. Active use of French in class discussions and conversation sessions with French assistants. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with teaching fellow.

Prerequisite: French 2203 {203} or placement in French 2204.

2305 {205} c. Advanced French through Film. Every fall. Fall 2013. Charlotte Daniels and Jay Ketner.

An introduction to film analysis. Conversation and composition based on a variety of contemporary French and Francophone films. Grammar review and frequent short papers. Emphasis on student participation including short presentations and a variety of oral activities. Three hours per week plus one weekly viewing session for films and weekly conversation session with teaching fellow.

Prerequisite: French 2204 {204} or placement in French 2305.

2407 {207} c - ESD, IP. Francophone Cultures. Every fall. Fall 2013. Hanétha Vété-Congolo.

An introduction to the cultures of various French-speaking regions outside of France. Examines the history, politics, customs, cinema, and the arts of the Francophone world, principally Africa and the Caribbean. (Same as Africana Studies 2407 {207} and Latin American Studies 2407 {206}.)

Prerequisite: French 2305 {205} or higher, placement in French 2407, or permission of the instructor.

2408 {208} c - ESD, IP. Contemporary France through the Media. Every spring. Spring 2014. Charlotte Daniels and Katherine Dauge-Roth.

An introduction to contemporary France through newspapers, magazines, television, music, and film. Emphasis is on enhancing communicative proficiency in French and increasing cultural understanding prior to study abroad in France.

Prerequisite: French 2305 {205} or higher, or permission of the instructor.

2409 {209} c - IP. Introduction to the Study and Criticism of Medieval and Early Modern French Literature. Every fall. Fall 2013. Katherine Dauge-Roth.

An introduction to the literary tradition of France from the Middle Ages to the French Revolution. Students are introduced to major authors and literary movements in their cultural and historical contexts.

Prerequisite: French 2305 {205} or higher, placement in French 2409, or permission of the instructor.

2410 {210} c - IP. Introduction to the Study and Criticism of Modern French Literature. Every spring. Spring 2014. Jay Ketner.

Introduces students to the literary tradition of France from 1789 to the present. Focus on major authors and literary movements in historical and cultural context.

Prerequisite: French 2305 {205} or higher, or permission of the instructor.

2411 {211} c - ESD, IP. Introduction to the Study and Criticism of Francophone Literature. Every spring. Spring 2014. Hanétha Vété-Congolo.

Introduces students to the literary tradition of the Francophone world. Focuses on major authors and literary movements in historical and cultural context. (Same as Africana Studies 2411 {209} and Latin American Studies 2211 {213}.)

Prerequisite: French 2305 {205} or higher, or permission of the instructor.

3000–3999 {309–329}. Topics in French and Francophone Literature. Every year. The Department.

Designed to provide students who have a basic knowledge of literature in French the opportunity to study more closely an author, a genre, or a period.

3201 {322} c. Voices of Women, Voices of the People. Spring 2014. Hanétha Vété-Congolo.

Focuses on texts written by women from former West Africa and the Caribbean. Themes treated—womanhood, colonization, slavery, race, individual and collective identity, relationships between men and women, independence, tradition, modernism, and alienation—are approached from historical, anthropological, political, social, and ideological perspectives. Readings by Mariama Bâ, Aminata Sow Fall (Sénégal); Tanella Boni (Côte d’Ivoire); Maryse Condé, Gisèle Pineau, Simone Schwartz-Bart (Guadeloupe); Ina Césaire, Fabienne Kanor, Suzanne Dracius (Martinique); and Marie Chauvet, Marie-Célie Agnant, and Kettly Mars (Haïti). (Same as Africana Studies 3201 {321}, Gender and Women’s Studies 3323 {323}, and Latin American Studies 3222 {322}.)

Prerequisite: Two of the following: French 2407 {207} (same as Africana Studies 2407 {207} and Latin American Studies 2407 {206}) or 2408 {208}; French 2409 {209}, 2410 {210}, or 2411 {211}; one course numbered 3000–3999 {300–399} in French; or permission of the instructor.

[3203 {323} c. Murder, Monsters, and Mayhem: The fait divers in Literature and Film.]

[3204 {316} c. French Theater Production.]

3205 {312} c. Urban Fictions in Québec Literature: The City as a Space of (Quiet) Revolution. Spring 2014. Jay Ketner.

A study of writing identity and the city in Québec novels from the 1960s to the present, considering Montréal as a primary site of foundational cultural and social transformations that continue to engender, through writing, new social possibilities and configurations. Related issues to be examined include how authors write cultural, political, and gender identity; questions of nationalism; marginalization; and the city and text as places for both understanding and imagining a nation. Authors studied may include Gabrielle Roy, Hubert Aquin, Monique LaRue, Jacques Godbout, Nicole Brossard, and Carole David.

Prerequisite: Two of the following: French 2407 {207} (same as Africana Studies 2407 {207} and Latin American Studies 2407 {206}) or 2408 {208}; French 2409 {209}, 2410 {210}, or 2411 {211}; one course numbered 3000–3999 {300–399} in French; or permission of the instructor.

[3206 {326} c. Body Language: Writing Corporeality in France.]

3207 {327} c. Love, Letters, and Lies. Fall 2013. Charlotte Daniels.

A study of memoir novels, epistolary novels (letters), and autobiography. What does writing have to do with love and desire? What is the role of others in the seemingly personal act of “self-expression”? What is the truth value of writing that circulates in the absence of its author? These and other related issues are explored in the works of the most popular writers of eighteenth-century France: Prévost, Graffigny, Laclos, and Rousseau. Conducted in French.

Prerequisite: Two of the following: French 2407 {207} (same as Africana Studies 2407 {207} and Latin American Studies 2407 {206}) or 2408 {208}; French 2409 {209}, 2410 {210}, or 2411 {211}; one course numbered 3000–3999 {300–399} in French; or permission of the instructor.

[3208 {328} c. Wanderings and Displacements: Shifting Identities in Nineteenth-Century French Literature.]

[3209 {317} c. Childhood Memories: Reflections on Self and Home in the Postcolonial Francophone Caribbean. (Same as Africana Studies 3317 {317} and Latin American Studies 3217 {317}.)]

3210 {325} c. Witches, Monsters, and Demons: Representing the Occult in Early Modern France. Fall 2013. Katherine Dauge-Roth.

The occult is, by definition, that which is hidden or unknown, yet popular and scholarly fascination with the shadowy and uncertain worlds of witches, monsters, demons, the devil, and the mysteries of nature and the cosmos has fueled attempts by various authorities, writers, and artists to represent and thus to know, control, or exploit the spectacular potential of the occult. Explores early modern and modern representations of occult figures, events, practitioners, and practices in France through historical, literary, and journalistic readings, art, film, television, and the Web. Emphasis is placed on the early modern period, but analysis of modern inheritances and interest in the occult parallel investigation of earlier periods throughout the course. Conducted in French.

Prerequisite: Two of the following: French 2407 {207} (same as Africana Studies 2407 {207} and Latin American Studies 2407 {206}) or 2408 {208}; French 2409 {209}, 2410 {210}, or 2411 {211}; one course numbered 3000–3999 {300–399} in French; or permission of the instructor.

4000–4003 {401–404} c. Independent Study in French. The Department.

4029 {405} c. Collaborative Study in French. The Department.

4050–4051 c. Honors Project in French. The Department.

Online Catalogue content is current as of August 1, 2013. For most current course information, use the online course finder. Also see Addenda.