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The College Catalogue

Psychology – Courses

First-Year Seminars

For a full description of first-year seminars, see the First-Year Seminar section.

[1010 {10} b. What’s on Your Mind? An Introduction to the Brain and Behavior.]

Introductory Courses

1101 {101} b. Introduction to Psychology. Every semester. The Department.

A general introduction to the major concerns of contemporary psychology, including physiological psychology, perception, learning, cognition, language, development, personality, intelligence, and abnormal and social behavior. Recommended for first- and second-year students. Juniors and seniors should enroll in the spring semester.

Intermediate Courses

2010 {210} b. Infant and Child Development. Fall 2013 and Spring 2014. Katherine D. O’Doherty.

A survey of major changes in psychological functioning from conception through childhood. Several theoretical perspectives are used to consider how physical, personality, social, and cognitive changes jointly influence the developing child’s interactions with the environment.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1101 {101} or placement above Psychology 1101 {101}.

2012 {222} b. Educational Psychology. Fall 2013. Kathryn Byrnes.

Examines theories of how people learn and the implications of those theories for the education of all students, particularly those who have been traditionally underserved in the United States. Course concepts will be grounded in empirical research and authentic activities geared toward understanding the nuances and complexities of perspectives on behavior, cognition, development, motivation, sociocultural identities, and pedagogy in PreK-12 educational contexts. Insights for the ways educators can structure learning experiences to better serve students’ needs from a variety of backgrounds will be cultivated through a field placement working with students. (Same as Education 2222 {222}.)

Prerequisite: Education 1101 {101}, Psychology 1101 {101}, or placement above Psychology 1101 {101}.

2020 {211} b. Personality. Every fall. Barbara S. Held.

A comparative survey of theoretical and empirical attempts to explain personality and its development. The relationships of psychoanalytic, interpersonal, humanistic, and behavioral approaches to current research are considered.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1101 {101} or placement above Psychology 1101 {101}.

2030 {212} b. Social Psychology. Every spring. Paul E. Schaffner.

A survey of theory and research on individual social behavior. Topics include self-concept, social cognition, affect, attitudes, social influence, interpersonal relationships, and cultural variations in social behavior.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1101 {101}, placement above Psychology 1101 {101}, or Sociology 1101 {101}.

2040 {216} b. Cognitive Psychology. Every fall. Louisa M. Slowiaczek.

A survey of theory and research examining how humans perceive, process, store, and use information. Topics include visual perception, attention, memory, language processing, decision making, and cognitive development.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1101 {101} or placement above Psychology 1101 {101}.

2050 {218} a. Physiological Psychology. Every spring. Richmond R. Thompson.

An introductory survey of biological influences on behavior. The primary emphasis is on the physiological regulation of behavior in humans and other vertebrate animals, focusing on genetic, developmental, hormonal, and neuronal mechanisms. Additionally, the evolution of these regulatory systems is considered. Topics discussed include perception, cognition, sleep, eating, sexual and aggressive behaviors, and mental disorders.

Prerequisite: One of the following: Psychology 1101 {101}, placement above Psychology 1101 {101}, Biology 1102 {102} or 1109 {109}.

2510 {251} b. Research Design in Psychology. Every fall. Paul E. Schaffner. Every spring. Louisa M. Slowiaczek.

A systematic study of the scientific method as it underlies psychological research. Topics include prominent methods used in studying human and animal behavior, the logic of causal analysis, experimental and non-experimental designs, issues in internal and external validity, pragmatics of careful research, and technical writing of research reports.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1101 {101} or placement above Psychology 1101 {101}.

2520 {252} a - MCSR. Data Analysis. Fall 2013. Suzanne B. Lovett. Spring 2014. Erika M. Nyhus.

An introduction to the use of descriptive and inferential statistics and design in behavioral research. Weekly laboratory work in computerized data analysis. Required of majors no later than the junior year, and preferably by the sophomore year.

Prerequisite: Psychology 1101 {101} or placement above Psychology 1101 {101}, and one of the following: Psychology 2510 {251}, Biology 1102 {102} or 1109 {109}.

Courses That Satisfy the Laboratory Requirement

2710 {277} b. Research in Developmental Psychology. Every spring. Samuel P. Putnam.

The multiple methods used in developmental research are examined both by reading research reports and by designing and conducting original research studies. The methods include observation, interviews, questionnaires, lab experiments, among others. Students learn to evaluate the relative strengths and weaknesses of both qualitative and quantitative approaches.

Prerequisite: Psychology 2010 {210}, 2510 {251}, and previous credit or concurrent registration in Psychology 2520 {252}.

2720 {260} b. Abnormal Psychology. Every spring. Spring 2014. Julie L. Quimby.

A general survey of the nature, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of common patterns of mental disorders. Students participate in a weekly supervised practicum at a local psychiatric unit.

Prerequisite: Psychology 2020 {211} and 2510 {251}.

2730 {274} b. Laboratory in Group Dynamics. Every fall. Paul E. Schaffner.

Principles and methods of psychological research, as developed in Psychology 2510 {251} and 2520 {252}, are applied to the study of small group interaction. Students design, conduct, and report on social behavior research involving an array of methods to shape and assess interpersonal behavior.

Prerequisite: One of the following: Psychology 2020 {211}, 2030 {212}, or 2031 {214}; and Psychology 2510 {251}; and previous credit or concurrent registration in Psychology 2520 {252}.

2740 {270} b. Laboratory in Cognition. Every fall. Louisa M. Slowiaczek.

An analysis of research methodology and experimental investigations in cognition, including such topics as auditory and sensory memory, visual perception, attention and automaticity, retrieval from working memory, implicit and explicit memory, metamemory, concept formation, and reasoning. Weekly laboratory sessions allow students to collect and analyze data in a number of different areas of cognitive psychology.

Prerequisite: Psychology 2040 {216}, 2510 {251}, and previous credit or concurrent registration in Psychology 2520 {252}.

2750 {275} a - INS. Laboratory in Behavioral Neuroscience: Social Behavior. Every spring. Richmond R. Thompson.

A laboratory course that exposes students to modern techniques in neuroscience that can be applied to the study of social behavior. Underlying concepts associated with various molecular, neuroanatomical, pharmacological, and electrophysiological methods are discussed in a lecture format. Students then use these techniques in laboratory preparations that demonstrate how social behavior is organized within the central nervous system of vertebrate animals, including humans.

Prerequisite: Psychology 2050 {218} or Biology 2011 {213}; one of the following: Psychology 2510 {251}, Biology 1102 {102} or 1109 {109}; and previous credit or concurrent registration in Psychology 2520 {252} or Mathematics 1300 {165}.

2775 {280} a - MCSR, INS. Laboratory in Cognitive Neuroscience. Fall 2013. Erika M. Nyhus.

A laboratory course that exposes students to multiple techniques in cognitive neuroscience that can be applied to the study of human cognition. Introduces human neuroimaging methods including electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Students will then use these methods to study aspects of human cognition including perception, attention, memory, language, problem solving, reasoning, and decision making.

Prerequisite: Psychology 2050 {218} or Biology 2135 {213}; and previous credit or concurrent enrollment in Psychology 2520 {252} or Mathematics 1300 {165}.

Advanced Courses

3010 {320} b. Social Development. Fall 2013. Samuel P. Putnam.

Research and theory regarding the interacting influences of biology and the environment as they are related to social and emotional development during infancy, childhood, and adolescence. Normative and idiographic development in a number of domains, including morality, aggression, personality, sex roles, peer interaction, and familial relationships are considered.

Prerequisite: Psychology 2010 {210} or 2031 {214} (same as Gender and Women’s Studies 2506 {214}), and Psychology 2510 {251} and 2520 {252}.

3020 {309} b. Psychotherapy, Psychology, and Philosophy. Every fall. Barbara S. Held.

Many clinical psychologists are returning to psychology’s roots in philosophy for guidance on how to best understand the nature and purposes of psychotherapy. Considers the clinical, scientific, and underlying philosophical issues that pertain to different systems of psychotherapy. In exploring different approaches to psychotherapy, particular attention is given to such questions as the nature of personhood and the self, methods of obtaining self-knowledge and warrant for claims about self-knowledge, whether humans have free will, the nature of therapeutic change, and the nature of human happiness or well being. Current debates about a proper science of psychotherapy are emphasized.

Prerequisite: Psychology 2020 {211}, 2510 {251}, and 2520 {252}.

3030 {328} b. Psychological Studies of Creativity. Spring 2014. Paul E. Schaffner.

Explores the nature, origins, processes, and consequences of creative activity in the arts and sciences, in public affairs, and in daily living. Examines psychological processes that support creative thought and action by individuals and collaborative groups, and ways that sociocultural contexts stimulate, recognize, and sanction such work. Readings and seminar discussions address aspects of personality, aptitude, cognition, motivation, self-regulation, and psychopathology in relation to creativity; and the influences of family and education in developing and expressing creative potential.

Prerequisite: Psychology 2510 {251} and 2520 {252}.

3040 {317} b. The Psychology of Language. Every spring. Louisa M. Slowiaczek.

An examination of psychological factors that affect the processing of language, including a discussion of different modalities (auditory and visual language) and levels of information (sounds, letters, words, sentences, and text/discourse). Emphasis is on the issues addressed by researchers and the theories developed to account for our language abilities.

Prerequisite: Psychology 2040 {216}, 2510 {251}, and 2520 {252}.

3050 {315} a. Hormones and Behavior. Every other fall. Fall 2014. Richmond R. Thompson.

An advanced discussion of concepts in behavioral neuroendocrinology. Topics include descriptions of the major classes of hormones, their roles in the regulation of development and adult behavioral expression, and the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for their behavioral effects. Hormonal influences on reproductive, aggressive, and parental behaviors, as well as on cognitive processes are considered.

Prerequisite: Psychology 2050 {218} or Biology 2011 {213}; one of the following: Psychology 2510 {251}, Biology 1102 {102} or 1109 {109}; and Psychology 2520 {252} or Mathematics 1300 {165}.

3051 {316} a. Comparative Neuroanatomy. Every other fall. Fall 2013. Richmond R. Thompson.

An advanced discussion of concepts in vertebrate brain organization. The primary emphasis is upon structure/function relationships within the brain, particularly as they relate to behavior. Topics include basic neuroanatomy, brain development and evolution, and the neural circuitry associated with complex behavioral organization. Studies from a variety of animal models and from human neuropsychological assessments are used to demonstrate general principles of brain evolution and function.

Prerequisite: Psychology 2050 {218} or Biology 2135 {213}; one of the following: Psychology 2510 {251}, Biology 1102 {102} or 1109 {109}; and Psychology 2520 {252} or Mathematics 1300 {165}.

Independent Study and Honors

2970–2973 {291–294} b. Intermediate Independent Study in Psychology. The Department.

2999 {299} b. Intermediate Collaborative Study in Psychology. The Department.

4000–4003 {401–404} b. Advanced Independent Study in Psychology. The Department.

4029 {405} b. Advanced Collaborative Study in Psychology. The Department.

4050–4051 b. Honors Project in Psychology. The Department.

Online Catalogue content is current as of August 1, 2013. For most current course information, use the online course finder. Also see Addenda.