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Latin American Studies – Courses

Introductory, Intermediate, and Advanced Courses

1330 {130} c - IP. Introduction to the Arts of Ancient Mexico and Peru. Spring 2014. Susan Wegner.

A chronological survey of the arts created by major cultures of ancient Mexico and Peru. Mesoamerican cultures studied include the Olmec, Teotihuacan, the Maya, and the Aztec up through the arrival of the Europeans. South American cultures such as Chavin, Naca, and Inca are examined. Painting, sculpture, and architecture considered in the context of religion and society. Readings in translation include Mayan myth and chronicles of the conquest. (Same as Art History 1300 {130}.)

[1337 {137} c - ESD, VPA. CuBop, Up-Rock, Boogaloo, and Banda: Latinos Making Music in the United States. (Same as Music 1269 {137}.)]

2005 {250} c - ESD. The Making of a Race: Latino Fictions. Fall 2013. Nadia V. Celis.

Explores the creation, representation, and marketing of U.S. Latino/a identities in American literature and popular culture from the 1960s. Focuses on the experience of artists and writers of Puerto Rican, Cuban, and Dominican origin; their negotiations with notions of race, class, gender, and sexuality in the United States; and their role in the struggle for social rights, in cultural translation, and in the marketing of ethnic identities, as portrayed in a variety of works ranging from movies and songs to poetry and narrative. Authors include Pietri, Blades, Álvarez, Hijuelos, Braschi, Ovejas, Díaz, and Quiñones. Readings and writing in English, discussions in Spanish. Spanish speaking skills required. (Same as English 2570 {250} and Spanish 2505 {250}.)

2104 {266} c - IP. History of Mexico. Spring 2014. Allen Wells.

A survey of Mexican history from pre-Columbian times to the present. Topics include the evolving character of indigenous societies, the nature of the Encounter, the colonial legacy, the chaotic nineteenth century, the Mexican Revolution, and United States-Mexican relations. Contemporary problems are also addressed. (Same as History 2404 {266}.)

2110 {221} c. Beyond Capoeira: History and Politics of Afro-Brazilian Culture. Spring 2014. Laura Premack.

Seminar. Brazil has the largest population of African descent outside Africa. Nowadays, Brazilians pride themselves on their country’s unique racial and cultural heritage, but for centuries, many Afro-Brazilian practices were illegal. The Afro-Brazilian renaissance currently underway is something to be celebrated, but it is also something to be questioned. Do these efforts to delineate, praise, and preserve Afro-Brazilian culture actually limit our understanding of it? Has labeling certain aspects of Brazilian cultural heritage as African created a situation in which other ways that Africa has influenced Brazil are overlooked? Just what is meant by “African” and “Brazilian” anyhow? Takes a historical and anthropological approach to these and other related questions. (Same as Africana Studies 2210 {210} and History 2871 {200}.)

2160 {253} c. The United States and Latin America: Tempestuous Neighbors. Fall 2014. Allen Wells.

Seminar. Examines scholarship on the evolution of United States-Latin American relations since Independence. Topics include the Monroe Doctrine, commercial relations, interventionism, Pan Americanism, immigration, and revolutionary movements during the Cold War. (Same as History 2860 {253}.)

2161 {254} c. Contemporary Argentina. Spring 2014. Allen Wells.

Seminar. Texts, novels, and films help unravel Argentine history and culture. Topics examined include the image of the gaucho and national identity; the impact of immigration; Peronism; the tango; the Dirty War; and the elusive struggle for democracy, development, and social justice. (Same as History 2861 {254}.)

2180 {236} c - ESD. Borderlands and Empires in Early North America. Spring 2014. Matthew Klingle.

Survey of the making of North America from initial contact between Europeans and Africans and Native Americans to the creation of the continent’s three largest nations by the mid-nineteenth century: Canada, Mexico, and the United States. Topics include the history of Native populations before and after contact, geopolitical and imperial rivalries that propelled European conquests of the Americas, evolution of free and coerced labor systems, environmental transformations of the continent’s diverse landscapes and peoples, formation of colonial settler societies, and the emergence of distinct national identities and cultures in former European colonies. Students write several papers and engage in weekly discussion based upon primary and secondary documents, art, literature, and material culture. (Same as Environmental Studies 2425 {235} and History 2180 {235}.)

2205 {205} c. Advanced Spanish. Every semester. Fall 2013. María Báez Marco, Margaret Boyle, and Enrique Yepes. Spring 2014. Nadia V. Celis and Elena Cueto Asín.

The study of topics in the political and cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world in the twentieth century, together with an advanced grammar review. Covers a variety of texts and media and is designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the intellectual and artistic traditions of Spain and Latin America. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant. (Same as Spanish 2305 {205}.)

Prerequisite: Spanish 2204 {204} or placement in Spanish 2305 {205}.

2211 {213} c - ESD, IP. Introduction to the Study and Criticism of Francophone Literature. Every spring. Spring 2014. Hanétha Vété-Congolo.

Introduces students to the literary tradition of the Francophone world. Focuses on major authors and literary movements in historical and cultural context. Conducted in French. (Same as Africana Studies 2411 {209} and French 2411 {211}.)

Prerequisite: French 2305 {205} or higher, or permission of the instructor.

2302 {202} c - IP. Demons and Deliverance in the Atlantic World. Fall 2013. Laura Premack.

Seminar. Examines beliefs and practices having to do with evil spirits, demons, and the Devil in Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean, the United States, and Western Europe. The primary focus is exorcism. What is it? How has it been practiced? By whom? Why? The approach to the subject is historical, transnational, and diasporic; examines changes and continuities across the Atlantic over the past five hundred years, beginning with cultural encounters between Africans, Native Americans, and Europeans during the colonial period and continuing up through the reverse missionization and the new African diaspora of the present day. Readings include works of ethnography, anthropology, theology, history, personal narrative, and fiction. (Same as Africana Studies 2202 {202}.)

2401 {252} c - IP. Colonial Latin America. Fall 2014. Allen Wells.

Introduces students to the history of Latin America from pre-Columbian times to about 1825. Traces developments fundamental to the establishment of colonial rule, drawing out regional comparisons of indigenous resistance and accommodation. Topics include the nature of indigenous societies encountered by Europeans; exploitation of African and Indian labor; evangelization and the role of the church; the evolution of race, gender, and class hierarchies in colonial society; and the origins of independence in Spanish America and Brazil. Note: This course fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors. (Same as History 2401 {252}.)

2402 {255} c - IP. Modern Latin America. Fall 2013. Allen Wells.

Traces the principal economic, social, and political transformations from the wars of independence to the present. Topics include colonial legacies and the aftermath of independence, the consolidation of nation-states and their insertion in the world economy, the evolution of land and labor systems, the politics of reform and revolution, and the emergence of social movements. (Same as History 2402 {255}.)

2403 {258} c - IP. Latin American Revolutions. Spring 2015. Allen Wells.

Examines revolutionary change in Latin America from a historical perspective, concentrating on four cases of attempted revolutionary change—Cuba, Chile, Nicaragua, and Venezuela. Popular images and orthodox interpretations are challenged and new propositions about these processes are tested. External and internal dimensions of each of these social movements are analyzed and each revolution is discussed in the full context of the country’s historical development. (Same as History 2403 {258}.)

2407 {206} c - ESD, IP. Francophone Cultures. Every fall. Fall 2013. Hanétha Vété-Congolo.

An introduction to the cultures of various French-speaking regions outside of France. Examines the history, politics, customs, cinema, and the arts of the Francophone world, principally Africa and the Caribbean. Conducted in French. (Same as Africana Studies 2407 {207} and French 2407 {207}.)

Prerequisite: French 2305 {205} or higher, placement in French 2407 {207}, or permission of the instructor.

2409 {209} c - IP. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Poetry and Theater. Every semester. Fall 2013. Elena Cueto Asín. Spring 2014. Margaret Boyle and Enrique Yepes.

A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of poetry and theater. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context. One weekly workshop with assistant in addition to class time. Conducted in Spanish. (Same as Spanish 2409 {209}.)

Prerequisite: Spanish 2305 {205} (same as Latin American Studies 2205 {205}) or permission of the instructor.

2410 {210} c - IP. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Essay and Narrative. Every semester. Fall 2013. Nadia V. Celis and Carolyn Wolfenzon. Spring 2014. Nadia V. Celis.

A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of essay and narrative. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context. (Same as Spanish 2410 {210}.)

Prerequisite: Spanish 2305 {205} (same as Latin American Studies 2205 {205}) or permission of the instructor.

2626 {226} b - IP. Political Economy of Pan-Americanism. Fall 2014 or Spring 2015. Stephen Meardon.

Examines programs for economic and political integration of the Americas from the early nineteenth century to the present. Surveys the material and ideological motives for Pan-Americanism from the Congress of Panama (1826) to the Organization of American States (1948), the draft of a Free Trade Area of the Americas (2001), and beyond. Different forms of integration are evaluated in light of historical consequences and economic ideas. (Same as Economics 2226 {226}.)

Prerequisite: Economics 1101 {101} or placement above Economics 1101 {101}.

2708 {278} b. Race and Ethnicity. Fall 2013. Ingrid Nelson.

The social and cultural meaning of race and ethnicity, with emphasis on the politics of events and processes in contemporary America. Analysis of the causes and consequences of prejudice and discrimination. Examination of the relationships between race and class. Comparisons among racial and ethnic minorities in the United States. (Same as Africana Studies 2208 {208} and Sociology 2208 {208}.)

Prerequisite: Sociology 1101 {101}, Africana Studies 1101{101}, or Anthropology 1101 {101}, or permission of the instructor.

[2711 {271} b. The Caribbean in the Atlantic World. (Same as Anthropology 2711 {271}.)]

[2724 {223} b - ESD. Religion and Social Transformation in South America. (Same as Anthropology 2723 {224}.)

[2738 {238} b - IP. Culture and Power in the Andes. (Same as Anthropology 2729 {238}.)]

2746 {246} b. Immigration and the Politics of Exclusion. Fall 2013. Marcos Lopez.

The United States, like other nations in the global north, relies on immigrants. Looks at comparative lessons in global immigration to understand the political, economic, and social causes of migration—the politics of immigrant inclusion/exclusion—and the making of diaspora communities. Specific topics will include: the politics of citizenship and the condition of illegality; the global migrant workforce; and how class, gender, race, and sexuality influence the migrant experience. (Same as Sociology 2370 {237}.)

Prerequisite: Sociology 1101 {101} or Anthropology 1101 {101}, or permission of the instructor.

[2771 {277} b. Children and Youth in Global Perspective. (Same as Anthropology 2371 {277}.)]

2774 b. The Borderlands of United States Empire: Puerto Rican Identities and Histories. Spring 2014. Melissa Rosario.

Using Puerto Rico as a case study from which to study borderlands theory, focuses on Puerto Rico’s unique political status in history, describing how its relationship to the United States as “foreign in a domestic sense” has shaped Puerto Rican identity and community formation. Topical focus placed on questions of language and representation, migration patterns, and relationships between mainland and island-based populations, as well as the psychological effects of colonialism. Develops students’ understanding that borders are both literal and metaphorical, but have real material effects on the unequal treatment of certain groups, even those purported to be part of the same nation-state. (Same as Anthropology 2274.)

Prerequisite: Anthropology 1101 {101} or Sociology 1101 {101}, or permission of the instructor.

3005 {305} c - ESD. The Making of a Race: Latino Fictions. Fall 2013. Nadia V. Celis.

Explores the creation, representation, and marketing of U.S. Latino/a identities in American literature and popular culture from the 1960s. Focuses on the experience of artists and writers of Puerto Rican, Cuban, and Dominican origin; their negotiations with notions of race, class, gender, and sexuality in the United States; and their role in the struggle for social rights, in cultural translation, and in the marketing of ethnic identities, as portrayed in a variety of works ranging from movies and songs to poetry and narrative. Authors include Pietri, Blades, Álvarez, Hijuelos, Braschi, Ovejas, Díaz, and Quiñones. Readings in English, discussions and writing in Spanish. (Same as English 2571 {221} and Spanish 3005 {305}.)

Prerequisite: Spanish 2409 {209} (same as Latin American Studies 2409 {209}) or 2410 {210} (same as Latin American Studies 2410 {210}).

3101 {352} c. The Mexican Revolution. Spring 2015. Allen Wells.

An examination of the Mexican Revolution (1910–1920) and its impact on modern Mexican society. Topics include the role of state formation since the revolution, agrarian reform, United States-Mexican relations, immigration, and other border issues. (Same as History 3401 {351}.)

3103 {356} c. The Cuban Revolution. Fall 2013. Allen Wells.

The Cuban Revolution recently celebrated its fiftieth anniversary. Offers a retrospective of a Revolution entering “middle age” and its prospects for the future. Topics include United States-Cuban relations, economic and social justice versus political liberty, gender and race relations, and literature and film in a socialist society. (Same as History 3403 {356}.)

[3201 {330} c. Andean Modernities. (Same as Spanish 3201 {321}.)]

[3204 {304} c. Dress and Body Politics in Latin America. (Same as Spanish 3004 {304}.)]

[3217 {317} c. Childhood Memories: Reflections on Self and Home in the Postcolonial Francophone Caribbean. (Same as Africana Studies 3317 {317} and French 3209 {317}.)]

[3218 {318} c. A Journey around Macondo: García Márquez and His Contemporaries. (Same as Spanish 3218 {318}.)]

[3220 {320} c. Beyond the Postcard: The Hispanic Caribbean. (Same as Africana Studies 3320 {320} and Spanish 3220 {320}.)]

3222 {322} c. Voices of Women, Voices of the People. Spring 2014. Hanétha Vété-Congolo.

Focuses on texts written by women from former West Africa and the Caribbean. Themes treated—womanhood, colonization, slavery, race, individual and collective identity, relationships between men and women, independence, tradition, modernism, and alienation—are approached from historical, anthropological, political, social, and ideological perspectives. Readings by Mariama Bâ, Aminata Sow Fall (Sénégal); Tanella Boni (Côte d’Ivoire); Maryse Condé, Gisèle Pineau, Simone Schwartz-Bart (Guadeloupe); Ina Césaire, Fabienne Kanor, Suzanne Dracius (Martinique); and Marie Chauvet, Marie-Célie Agnant, and Kettly Mars (Haïti). (Same as Africana Studies 3201 {321}, French 3201 {322}, and Gender and Women’s Studies 3323 {323}.)

Prerequisite: Two of the following: French 2407 {207} (same as Africana Studies 2407 {207} and Latin American Studies 2407 {206}) or 2408 {208}; French 2409 {209}, 2410 {210}, or 2411 {211}; one course numbered 3000–3999 {300–399} in French; or permission of the instructor.

[3229 {329} c. Short Cuts: The Latin American Nouvelle. (Same as Spanish 3229 {329}.)]

[3236 {336} c. Reading Images: Intersections of Art, Film, and Literature in Contemporary Latin America. (Same as Spanish 3236 {336}.)]

3237 {337} c. Hispanic Short Story. Fall 2013. Gustavo Faverón Patriau.

An investigation of the short story as a literary genre, beginning in the nineteenth century, involving discussion of its aesthetics, as well as its political, social, and cultural ramifications in the Spanish-speaking world. Authors include Pardo Bazán, Echevarría, Borges, Cortázar, García Márquez, Ferré, and others. (Same as Spanish 3237 {337}.)

Prerequisite: Two of the following: Spanish 2409 {209} (same as Latin American Studies 2409 {209}), 2410 {210} (same as Latin American Studies 2410 {210}), 3200 {310} or higher; or permission of the instructor.

[3243 {343} c. Imaginary Cities/Real Cities in Latin America. (Same as Spanish 3243 {343}.)]

[3244 {344} c. Bad Girls on Stage in Early Modern Spain and Spanish America. (Same as Gender and Women’s Studies 3001 {344} and Spanish 3244 {344}.)]

3245 {345} c. Ecological Thought in Latin American Literature. Fall 2013. Enrique Yepes.

Explores how the radical interconnectedness postulated by ecological thinking can be read in Latin American narrative, essay, film, and poetry from the 1920s to the present. Includes a review of cultural ecology as well as an overview of environmental history and activism in the region. (Same as Environmental Studies 2485 {285} and Spanish 3245 {345}.)

Prerequisite: Two of the following: Spanish 2409 {209} (same as Latin American Studies 2409 {209}), 2410 {210} (same as Latin American Studies 2410 {210}), 3200 {310} or higher; or permission of the instructor.

[3247 {347} c. Translating Cultures. (Same as Spanish 3247 {347}.)]

3362 c. Spiritual Encounters: African Religion in the Americas. Spring 2014. Laura Premack.

Investigates how African, European, and indigenous beliefs about the spirit world have combined in the development of African diasporic religion in the Americas. Historicizes and theorizes the development of several varieties, focusing particularly on Candomblé, Umbanda, and Spiritism in Brazil. Also considers Santería in Cuba, the Dominican Republic, and New York; Vodun in Haïti; Hoodoo in the Mississippi Delta; and Obeah in Jamaica and Guyana. Explores concepts of syncretism, hybridity, cultural encounter, identity, performance, and diaspora. (Same as Africana Studies 3362.)

Prerequisites: One course in Africana studies or Latin American studies, or permission of instructor.

3711 {311} b - ESD, IP. Global Sexualities/Local Desires. Fall 2013. Krista Van Vleet.

Explores the variety of practices, performances, and ideologies of sexuality through a cross-cultural perspective. Focusing on contemporary anthropological scholarship on sexuality and gender, asks how Western conceptions of “sexuality,” “sex,” and “gender” help (or hinder) our understanding of the lives and desires of people in other social and cultural contexts. Topics may include “third gendered” individuals; intersexuality and the naturalization of sex; language and the performance of sexuality; drag; global media and the construction of identity; lesbian and gay families; sex work; AIDS and HIV and health policy; migration, asylum and human rights issues; ethical issues and activism. Ethnographic examples are drawn from United States, Latin America (Brazil, Dominican Republic, Mexico, Argentina, Cuba); Asia (India, Japan, Indonesia) and Oceania (Papua New Guinea); and Africa (Nigeria, South Africa). Presents issues of contemporary significance along with key theoretical perspectives and methodological approaches used by anthropologists. Integrates perspectives on globalization and the intersection of multiple social differences (including class, race, and ethnicity) with discussion of sexuality and gender. Not open to students with credit in Anthropology 210 (same as Gay and Lesbian Studies 210, Gender and Women’s Studies 210, and Latin American Studies 211). (Same as Anthropology 3100 {313}, Gay and Lesbian Studies 3100 {313}, and Gender and Women’s Studies 3100 {313}.)

Prerequisite: Anthropology 1101 {101} or Sociology 1101 {101}, or permission of the instructor.

4000–4001 {401–402} c. Advanced Independent Study and Honors in Latin American Studies. The Program.

4029 {405} c. Advanced Collaborative Study in Latin American Studies. The Program.

4050–4051 c. Honors Project in Latin American Studies. The Program.

Online Catalogue content is current as of August 1, 2013. For most current course information, use the online course finder. Also see Addenda.