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The College Catalogue

Interdisciplinary Majors – Overview

Art History and Archaeology

Requirements

1. Art History 1100 {100}; one of Art History 2130 {213}, 2140, or 2150 {215}; and one of Art History 3000–3999 {302–388}; Archaeology 1101 {101} (same as Art History 2090 {209}), 1102 {102} (same as Art History 2100 {210}), and any three additional archaeology courses, at least one of which must be at the advanced level (numbered 3000–3999 {300–399}).

2. Art History 2220

3. Any two art history courses.

4. One of the following: Classics 1101 {101}, 1111(same as History 1111), 1112 (same as History 1112), or 2970–2973 {291 –294} (Independent Study in Ancient History); Philosophy 2111 {111}; or an appropriate course in religion at the intermediate level (numbered 2000–2969 {200–289}).

5. Either Art History 4000 {401} or Archaeology 4000 {401}.

Art History and Visual Arts

Requirements

1. Art History: 1100 {100}; one course in African, Asian, or pre-Columbian art history numbered 1103 {103} or higher; four additional courses numbered 2000 {200} or higher; and one advanced seminar (numbered 3000-3999 {300–399}).

2. Visual Arts: 1101 {150}; and one of 1201 {170}, 1401 {180}, or 1601 {195}; plus four other courses in the visual arts, no more than one of which may be an independent study.

Chemical Physics

Requirements

1. Chemistry 1102 or 1109 {102 or 109}, 2510 {251}; Mathematics 1600 {161}, 1700 {171}, and 1800 {181}; Physics 1130 {103}, 1140 {104}, 2130 {223}, and 2150 {229}.

2. Either Chemistry 2520 {252} or Physics 3140 {310}.

3. Two courses from Chemistry 3100 {310}, 3400 {340}, or approved topics in 4000, 401 or higher; Physics 2250 {251}, 3000 {300}, 3130 {320}, 3810 {357} (same as Earth and Oceanographic Science 3050 {357} and Environmental Studies 3957 {357}), or approved topics in 4000 {401} or 4001 {402}. At least one of these must at the advanced level (numbered 3000–3999 {300–399}). Other possible electives may be feasible; interested students should check with the departments.

Computer Science and Mathematics

Requirements

1. Computer Science 1101 {101}, 2101 {210}, and 2200 {231}.

2. Mathematics 1800 {181}, 2000 {201}, and 2020 {200}.

3. Three additional computer science courses that satisfy the following requirements: at least one course in each of the areas Artificial Intelligence and Systems, and at least one advanced course (numbered 3000–3999 {300–399}).

4. Two additional mathematics courses from: 2108 {204} (same as Biology 1174 {174}), 2109 {229}, 2206 {225}, 2208 {224}, 2209 {244}, 2601 {258}, 2602 {262}, 2606 {265}, 3209 {264 or 329}, 3404 {307}, and 4000 {401}. An independent study may be applied to the major upon approval of the appropriate department.

5. Each course submitted for the major must be passed with a grade of C- or better.

English and Theater

The interdisciplinary major in English and theater focuses on the dramatic arts, broadly construed, with a significant emphasis on the critical study of drama and literature. Students of English and theater may blend introductory and advanced course work in both fields, while maintaining flexibility in the focus of their work. Honors theses in English and theater are listed as honors in English and theater, rather than in either field individually. Students completing an honors project should be guided by faculty in both fields. Students who decide to take this major are encouraged to work with advisors in both fields. Students wishing to study abroad are allowed to count two courses in approved study away programs such as the National Theater Institute or elsewhere toward the requirements for the major.

Requirements

1. An English first-year seminar or introductory course (numbered 1100–1999 {100–199}).

2. One introductory theater course (numbered 1100–1999 {100–199}), preferably Theater 1201 {120}.

3. Three theater courses from the following: 1101 {101}, 1201 {150}, 1203 {145} (same as Dance 1203 {145}), 1302 {130} (same as Dance 1302 {130}), 2201 {220}, 2202 {225}, 2203 {270}, 2401 {260} (same as English 2850 {214}), 2402 {250} (same as Dance 2402 {250}), 2501 {201}, or 2502 {240} (same as Dance 2502 {240}).

4. One course from English 2150 {210} (same as Theater 2810 {210}) or 2151 {211} (same as Theater 2811 {211}).

5. One course in modern drama, either English 2452 {262}(same as Gender and Women’s Studies xxxx {262} and Theater xxxx {262}), 2654 (same as AFRS 2630), or the equivalent in another department.

6. One advanced course in theater (numbered 3000–3999 {300–399}), and one advanced English seminar (numbered 3000–3999 {300–399}).

7. One elective in English and one elective in theater or dance at the intermediate level (numbered 2000–2969 {200–289}).

Eurasian and East European Studies

The interdisciplinary major in Eurasian and East European studies combines the study of the Russian language with related courses in anthropology, economics, German, government, history, music, and gender and women’s studies. The major emphasizes the common aspects of the geo-political area of Eurasia and East Europe, including the European and Asian countries of the former USSR, East Central Europe, and the Balkans. The Eurasian and East European studies (EEES) major allows students to focus their study on one cultural, social, political, or historical topic, illuminating the interrelated linkages of these countries.

This major combines multiple fields into a study of one common theme, in order to provide a multidisciplinary introduction to the larger region, while allowing for an in-depth study of the student’s specific geographical area of choice. EEES independent study allows an interested student to work with one or more faculty members in order to merge introductory and advanced course work into a focused and disciplined research project. Course work in the Russian language or other regional languages is expected to start as early as possible in the student’s academic career.

Careful advising and consultation with EEES faculty members is essential to plan a student’s four-year program, taking into consideration course prerequisites, the rotation of courses, and/or sabbatical or research leaves. Independent study allows a student to conduct interdisciplinary research under the careful guidance of two or more advisors or readers.

Requirements

1. Two years of Russian (Russian 1101 {101}, 1102 {102}, 2203 {203}, 2204 {204}), or the equivalent in another language (i.e., Slovene, Serbian/Croatian).

2. Four courses from the concentration core courses after consultation with EEES faculty. At least one course should be at the intermediate level (numbered 2000–2969 {200–289}) and one at the advanced level (numbered 3000–3999 {300–399}). Upon petition to EEES faculty, a student completing the EEES concentration can satisfy the requirement by substituting a course from the complementary list of Russian courses (listed below) or through independent studies in those cases in which (1) faculty members are on sabbatical leave, (2) the course is not rotated often enough, (3) a course is withdrawn (as when a faculty member leaves), and/or (4) a new, related course is offered on a one-time-only basis.

3. Any two courses outside the EEES concentration to be selected from the complementary list below, one at the intermediate level (numbered 2000–2969 {200–289}) and one at the advanced level (numbered 3000–39999 {300–399}). With approval of an EEES faculty member, requirements (2) and (3) may be fulfilled in part by an independent study in the concentration or in the area of complementary courses.

4. Only one introductory course or first-year seminar may count toward the major.

5. An honors project in either concentration requires two semesters of independent study for a total of eleven courses in the major. EEES offers three levels of honors.

6. Off-campus study at an approved program is strongly recommended. Up to three courses in an approved program may be counted toward the major.

EEES Concentration Core and Complementary Courses

(beyond Russian 2204 {204})

A. Concentration in Russian/East European Politics, Economics, History, Sociology, and Anthropology.

Core courses:

Economics 2221 {221} b - MCSR, ESD. Marxian Political Economy

Gender and Women’s Studies 2600 {275} b. Gender and Sexuality in Contemporary Eastern Europe

[Government 2410 {230} b. Post-Communist Russian Politics and Society]

[Government 3510 {324} b. Post-Communist Pathways]

History 2108 {218} c - ESD, IP. The History of Russia, 1725–1924

[History 2109 {219} c - ESD, IP. Russia’s Twentieth Century: Revolution and Beyond]

B. Complementary Courses in Eurasian and East European Literature and Culture:

German 1151 {151} c - ESD. The Literary Imagination and the Holocaust

[German 3317 {317} c - IP. German Literature and Culture since 1945]

Music 2773{273} c. Chorus (when content applies)

Russian 1022 {22} c. “It Happens Rarely, Maybe, but It Does Happen”—Fantasy and Satire in East Central Europe

Russian 2220 {220} c - IP. Nineteenth-Century Russian Literature

Russian 2221 {221} c - IP, VPA. Soviet Worker Bees, Revolution, and Red Love in Russian Film (same as Gender and Women’s Studies 2510 {220})

Russian 2223 {223} c. Dostoevsky and the Novel (same as Gender and Women’s Studies 2221 {221})

Courses in Russian:

Russian 3077 {307} c. Russian Folk Culture

Russian 3099 {309} c. Nineteenth-Century Russian Literature

Russian 3100 {310} c. Modern Russian Literature

Russian 3166 {316} c. Russian Poetry

Mathematics and Economics

Requirements

1. Six courses in mathematics as follows: Mathematics 1800 {181}, 2000 {201}, 2206 {225}, 2606 {265}; and two of Mathematics 2109 {229}, 2208 {224}, 3108 {304 or 318}, 3109 {319}, 3208 {328}, 3209 {264 or 329}.

2. Either Computer Science 2101 {210} or Mathematics 2209 {244} or 3606 {305}.

3. Economics 2555 {255}, 2556 {256}, 3516 {316}, and one other advanced course (numbered 3000–3999 {300–399}).

4. Each course submitted for the major must be passed with a grade of C- or better.

Mathematics and Education

The interdisciplinary major in mathematics and education combines the study of mathematics and pedagogy. The prescribed mathematics courses represent the breadth of preparation necessary for both the scholarly study as well as the practice of secondary school mathematics. The required education courses provide students with the theoretical knowledge and practicum-based experiences crucial to understanding the challenges of secondary mathematics education. Students completing this major are prepared to become leaders in the field of mathematics education, either as scholars or educators.

Majors in mathematics and education are eligible to apply for admission to the Bowdoin Teacher Scholars teacher certification program. Completing the major requirements in a timely fashion requires advanced planning, so students are strongly encouraged to meet with faculty from both the mathematics and education departments early in their college careers.

Requirements

1. Eleven courses from the departments of mathematics and education, all passed with a grade of C- or better. At most two of the courses in mathematics can be transfer credits from other institutions. Transfer credits are not accepted for the courses in education.

2. Mathematics 1800 {181}, 2000 {201}, and 2020 {200}.

3. At least one mathematics course in modeling: Mathematics 2108 {204} (same as Biology 1174 {174}), 2109 {229}, 2208 {224}, or 2209 {244}.

4. At least one mathematics course in algebra and analysis: Mathematics 2302 {232}, 2303 {233}, 2502 {232 or 253}, 2602 {262}, 2603 {263}, or 2702.

5. At least one mathematics course in geometry: Mathematics 2404 {247} or 3404 {307}.

6. At least one course in statistics: Mathematics 1200 {155}, 1300 {165}, or 2606 {265}. This statistics requirement may alternately be met with a score of 4 or 5 on the AP Statistics exam, Economics 2557 {257}, or Psychology 2520 {252}, provided that the student also completes Mathematics 2206 {225}.

7. Education 1101 {101}, 2203 {203}, 3301 {301}, and 3302 {303}. Students must take Education 3301 and 3302 {301 and 303} concurrently during the fall semester of their junior or senior year.


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