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The College Catalogue

First-Year Seminars – Courses

Africana Studies 1010 {10} b. Racism. Fall 2013. Roy Partridge.

Examines issues of racism in the United States, with attention to the social psychology of racism, its history, its relationship to social structure, and its ethical and moral implications. (Same as Sociology 1010 {10}.)

Africana Studies 1012 {12} c. Affirmative Action and United States Society. Fall 2015. Brian Purnell.

Interdisciplinary exploration of the rise and fall (and reappearance) of the “affirmative action debate” that shaped so much of the American “culture wars” during the 1970s–2000s. Students primarily study affirmative action in the United States, but there will also be comparative analysis of “affirmative action” systems in societies outside the United States, such as South Africa and India. Examines important Supreme Court cases that have shaped the contours of affirmative action, the rise of “diversity” discourse, and the different ways political and cultural ideologies, not to mention historical notions of American identity, have determined when, where, and how affirmative action has existed, and whom it benefits. Through examination of law, economics, sociology, anthropology, history, and political science, introduces students to different methodological approaches that inform Africana Studies and that field’s examination of the role people of African descent have played in contemporary and historical American society. Writing intensive. Analytical discussions of assigned texts.

Africana Studies 1019 c. Holy Songs in a Strange Land. Spring 2014. Judith Casselberry.

Examines Black American sacred music from its earliest forms, fashioned by enslaved Africans, through current iterations, produced by Black global actors of a different sort. What does bondage sound like? What does emancipation sound like? Can we hear corresponding sounds generated by artists today? In what ways have creators of sacred music embraced, rejected, and re-envisioned the “strange land” over time? Looks at musical and lyrical content and the context in which various music genres developed, such as Negro spirituals, gospel, and sacred blues. Contemporary artists such as Janelle Monáe, Beyoncé, and Lupe Fiasco included as well. (Same as Music 1011.)

Africana Studies 1025 {25} c. The Civil War in Film. Fall 2013. Patrick Rael.

Explores the American Civil War through an examination of popular films dedicated to the topic. Students analyze films as a representation of the past, considering not simply their historical subject matter, but also the cultural and political contexts in which they are made. Films include The Birth of a Nation, Gone with the Wind, Glory, and Cold Mountain. Weekly evening film screenings. (Same as History 1016 {25}.)

Africana Studies 1026 {16} c. Fictions of Freedom. Fall 2013. Tess Chakkalakal.

Explores the ways in which the idea of American freedom has been defined both with and against slavery through readings of legal and literary texts. Students to come to terms with the intersections between the political, literary, and historical concept of freedom and its relation to competing definitions of American citizenship. (Same as English 1026 {26}.)

Africana Studies 1040 {13} c. From Montezuma to Bin Laden: Globalization and Its Critics. Fall 2013. David Gordon.

Examines the challenge that globalization and imperialism pose for the study of history. How do historians balance the perspectives of victors and victims in past and present processes of globalization? How important are non-European versions of the past that may contradict European Enlightenment historical ideas and ideals? Class discussions interrogate questions about globalization and imperialism raised by proponents and critics, ranging from the Spanish conquest of Mexico to the American conquest of Iraq. (Same as History 1040 {16}.)

Anthropology 1013 {13} b. Beyond Pocahontas: Native American Stereotypes. Spring 2014. Kelly Fayard.

Traces the development of Native American stereotypes perpetuated by popular media both historically and at present. Considers effects of such stereotypes in contemporary media and popular culture. Analyzes films, literature, advertisements, cartoons, newspapers, magazines, and sports team mascots, among other forms of popular media and culture. Explores the diversity and variety of Native American peoples that are in opposition to media-produced stereotypical images.

Anthropology 1027 {27} b. Understanding Ourselves in the Digital Age. Fall 2013. Melissa Rosario.

Through journal articles, films, and Internet sites explores how the Internet has cultivated new modes of communication and a new sense of selfhood among individuals and in society. Investigates the blurring of human and technological worlds and how that has shaped people’s perception of the boundary of self and world. Also, asks how prevalent social inequalities have made their way online. To understand this massive technological transformation and its impact on societies, students will turn to their own lives, exploring how their identities and everyday lives are shaped by the Internet.

Art History 1019 {19} c. Representing the Modern Artist in Word and Image. Fall 2013. Susan B. Bakewell.

Artists’ experiences as recorded in self-portraits and life writings, and in others’ writings and images, shape this investigation into art-making in Europe. Examines the commonalities and particularities of early-modern and modern artists’ situations within the larger contexts of artistic training, belief, class, economics, gender, geography, historical events, patronage, and politics. Class meetings feature viewings, discussions, and museum and studio field trips. Sequenced research and writing assignments introduce students to research and resources, develop critical-thinking skills, and offer valuable practice in drafting, revising, and refining written work.

Art History 1026 {26} c. Art and the Public Sphere. Fall 2013. Natasha Goldman.

Examines public art that generates conversations about identity, disenfranchisement, and belonging, from 1960 to the present. Topics include but are not limited to: borders and immigration (Emily Jacir, Border Film Project), minority identities (Rob Lowe, Suzanne Lacy), queer subjectivity (Gran Fury, Felix González-Torres), environmental activism (Natalie Jeremijenko, Chris Drury), and memorials to tragedy (Ground Zero). Theories of memory and the public sphere help us to analyze works studied. Students work in groups to commission, design, and jury a hypothetical work of public art. The course may include one field trip to Boston.

Asian Studies 1006 c. China Encounters the West. Fall 2014. Leah Zuo.

Explores the historical relationship between China and the West through examining a selection of their encounters from the seventeenth through the early twentieth centuries. Key episodes include: the Jesuit and Protestant missions, the arrival of the Industrial West (imperialism and war), the Cold War, and beyond. Examines such themes as religion and religiosity, science and technology, and the dynamics of cultural accommodation and communication. Interdisciplinary. Draws upon readings of history, the history of science, religion, and political science. Note: This course fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors. (Same as History 1036.)

Asian Studies 1043 {23} c. East Asian Genre Cinema: Action, Anime, and Martial Arts. Fall 2013. Shu-chin Tsui.

Explores East Asian cinema from a genre perspective with a focus on Hong Kong action, Japanese anime, and transnational martial arts films. In the framework of social-cultural history and context of genre theory, examines the paradigms that characterize the form and content of such films; investigates the relations between local-global and national-transnational; studies genre-specific issues such as spectators’ perception or industry practices to discern the role of gender, nation, power, and historiography. After taking the course, students will be able to explain the theoretical concepts of genre cinema, analyze the genre’s visual formation, and comprehend the social-cultural implications of the genre. (Same as Film Studies 1043 {23}.)

Biology 1026 {26} a. Adventures in Neuroscience: Aphasias, Auras, and Axons. Fall 2013. Hadley Horch.

Students will be introduced to the basics of neurobiology, and begin to understand the challenges inherent to studying the brain. Topics will include basic neuronal function, animal behavior, mutations and mental illness, drugs and addiction, neuroethics, and consciousness. Readings from journal articles, websites, and popular press science books will be used. Students will develop critical thinking skills through regular class discussions, debates, and in-class scientific experimentation and data collection. Regular writing assignments will utilize a variety of science writing styles.

[Biology 1027 {27} a. Evolutionary Links.]

Chemistry 1011 {11} a. Great Issues in Science. Fall 2013. Daniel M. Steffenson.

Presents a realistic and mature picture of science and the methods employed by current scientists to provide acceptable justifications for scientific hypotheses and theories. Starting with the invention of science by the ancient Greek philosophers (Lucretius, On the Nature of Things) and using historical examples from various sciences, three philosophical models of justification are examined in detail: logical empiricism (the Vienna Circle), Fallibilism (Popper), and Conventionalism (Kuhn). Several literary images of science (Vonnegut, Brecht, Pynchon, Crichton) are compared to the philosophical models. Examines the role of scientists in making certain value judgments about issues raised by developments such as organ transplants or stem cell research.

Classics 1011 {11} c. Shame, Honor, and Responsibility. Fall 2013. Jennifer Clarke Kosak.

Examines Greek and Roman notions of responsibility to family, state, and self, and the social ideals and pressures that shaped ancient attitudes towards duty, shame, and honor. Readings may include works by Homer, Sophocles, Euripides, Virgil, Ovid, and Petronius.

[Classics 1019 {19} c. Ancient Democracy and Its Critics.]

Dance 1010 {10} c. Understanding Theater and Dance: Doing, Viewing, and Reviewing. Fall 2014. The Department of Theater and Dance.

The goal is appreciation and understanding of contemporary performance. Investigates critical perspectives on dance, drama, and other performance events. Develops viewing and writing skills: description, analysis, interpretation, evaluation. Attending live performances, on and off campus, watching films and videos, and participating in studio workshops with performers and writers provide a basis for four essays and other modes of critical response—written, oral, or visual. (Same as Theater 1010 {10}.)

Economics 1018 {18} b. The Art of the Deal: Commerce and Culture. Fall 2013.
B. Zorina Khan.

Explores the economics of culture, including the analysis of markets for art, music, literature, and movies. If culture is “priceless,” then why do artists starve while providers of pet food make billions? Why are paintings by dead artists generally worth more than paintings by living artists? Could music piracy on the information superhighway benefit society? Can Tom Hanks turn a terrible movie into a contender at the box office? Students are not required to have any prior knowledge of economics, and will not be allowed to argue that baseball comprises culture.

Education 1015 {15} c. Urban Education. Fall 2013. Doris Santoro.

Explores the experiences of various stakeholders: students, parents, teachers, educational leaders, unions, local residents, and non-profit and educational management organizations; and the roles of urban public schools in their communities. Films and readings examine representations of urban students, their teachers, and their schools; analyze the purposes, challenges, and possibilities of urban education; consider schools’ relationships to the cities in which they are located; and interrogate the politics of urban teaching. Investigates urban schools as sites of promise and innovation as well as sites for social and political struggle.

[Education 1020 {20} c. The Educational Crusade.]

English 1003 {10} c. Shakespeare’s Afterlives. Fall 2013. Aaron Kitch.

Romeo and Juliet as garden gnomes, Richard III as Adolf Hitler, King Lear as aging patriarch of an Iowa family farm . . . Shakespeare has been translated and reimagined in various ways over the centuries. Explores some of the ways his works have been adapted and appropriated from the sixteenth century until today. Reading selected plays by Shakespeare in tandem with adaptations, examines the aesthetic, cultural, and political transformations of the Bard in a variety of genres, including prose, film, and a range of visual arts. Authors may include Tom Stoppard, Jane Smiley, and Arthur Philips, with films by Julie Taymor (Titus Andronicus) and Kelly Asbury (Gnomeo and Juliet).

English 1013 {12} c. Homebodies: Geography as Identity in Fiction. Fall 2013. Sarah Braunstein.

Where are you from? How does the place you’re born and raised inform your consciousness? Novels answer these questions more fully and deeply than any other kind of writing. Investigates psychological, spiritual, cultural, historical, and political meanings of home. Students read novels, stories, and essays in which place is itself a character. Questions include: How do writers create vivid, palpable places? How does a book’s setting illuminate the (often secret) lives of its characters? Special focus on the coastline, on water, and on shape-shifting landscapes that draw attention to shifting identities. Through critical and creative assignments, students analyze creative prose and write their own. By experimenting with various stylistic techniques, and by visiting sites along the Maine coast, participants seek to document past homes in a new way—and to experience a new place as home. Readings may include Virginia Woolf, Denton Welsh, James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Annie Dillard, Marilynn Robinson, Jamaica Kincaid, Bonnie Nadzam, Eowyn Ivy, and others. (Same as Gender and Women’s Studies 1013 {26}.)

English 1016 {13} c. Hawthorne. Fall 2013. William Watterson.

Readings include selected short stories, Fanshawe, The Scarlet Letter, The Blithedale Romance, The House of the Seven Gables, The Marble Faun, Septimus Felton, and James Mellow’s Nathaniel Hawthorne in His Times.

English 1026 {26} c. Fictions of Freedom. Fall 2013. Tess Chakkalakal.

Explores the ways in which the idea of American freedom has been defined both with and against slavery through readings of legal and literary texts. Students come to terms with the intersections between the political, literary, and historical concept of freedom and its relation to competing definitions of American citizenship. (Same as Africana Studies 1026 {16}.)

English 1041 {21} c. Arab and Jew in Literature and Film. Spring 2014. Marilyn Reizbaum.

Considers the interface between Arabs and Jews as produced on page and screen. Offers both geographical and generic range, bringing into view texts that talk to each other across ethnic, religious, historical, and theoretical boundaries. When these two figures are placed in relation to each other, they must invoke the Middle East, in particular Palestine-Israel: discusses works in translation, fiction and poetry, from the broad region, and may include authors Anton Shammas, Mahmoud Darwish, Ronit Matalon, Shimon Ballas, Haim Hazazz; writers in English such as Naomi Shihab Nye, Ammiel Alcalay, Philip Roth, Edward Said, and Ella Shohat; films by Elia Suleiman (Chronicle of a Disappearance), Khleifi (Wedding in Galilee), Gitai (Kippur), Abu-Assad (Paradise Now), Kolirin (The Band’s Visit), Kassovitz (Hate); and visual artists Mona Hatoum and Adi Nes.

English 1042 {22} c. Transfigurations of Song. Fall 2013. David Collings.

A course in close reading. Explores poetry, primarily in the Romantic tradition, which dallies with the dangers of lyrical transport, whether in the form of fusion with the divine, aesthetic seduction, impossible quest, or physical transfiguration. Authors may include Coleridge, Wordsworth, Keats, Tennyson, Yeats, Crane, and Stevens.

English 1043 {29} c. Fact and Fiction. Fall 2013. Brock Clarke.

An introduction to the study and creation of various kinds of narrative forms (short story, travel essay, bildungsroman, detective fiction, environmental essay, satire, personal essay, etc.). Students write critical essays and use the readings in the class as models for their own short stories and works of creative nonfiction. Class members discuss a wide range of published canonical and contemporary narratives and workshop their own essays and stories. In doing so, the class dedicates itself to both the study of literature and the making of it.

English 1046 {24} c. After Kafka. Fall 2013. Hilary Thompson.

A look at contemporary global fiction with an eye for the influence of Franz Kafka (1883–1924). Investigates how and why current writers from around the world have acknowledged Kafka’s work as they have engaged with themes of modern alienation, modes of magical realism, ideas of existence’s absurdity, images of arbitrary authoritarian power, and questions of human/animal difference. Considers what it means for a writer to spawn an adjective as well as whether an international literary world grown ever more Kafka friendly is necessarily evidence of a world grown ever more Kafkaesque. Authors, in addition to Kafka, may include Jorge Luis Borges, Italo Calvino, Can Xue, J. M. Coetzee, Yiyun Li, Haruki Murakami, and Jonathan Tel.

English 1047 {23} c. Early European Representations of Islam. Fall 2013. Emma Maggie Solberg.

Introduces students to Islam in the medieval and early modern European imagination, covering a wide array of interdisciplinary sources: bitter religious polemic, eyewitness accounts of the Crusades, and fantastical travel narratives—written from both Christian and Muslim perspectives—as well as medieval and Renaissance European romances about Saracen knights and plays about Turkish tyrants. Texts include The Qur’an, Dante’s Inferno, The Song of Roland, The Travels of Sir John Mandeville, and William Percy’s Mahomet and His Heaven.

English 1048 {25} c. Contemporary Short Fiction in English. Fall 2013. Celeste Goodridge.

Examines some of the formal features of narrative: plot, character development, point of view, the role of the reader, and closure, arguing that short stories have different requirements of economy than longer narratives. Emphasizing Gothic elements and representations of transgression, power, secrets, dysfunctionality, and domestic arrangements, authors may include Tessa Hadley, Alice Munro, Colm Toibin, William Trevor, and Claire Keegan.

[Environmental Studies 1012 {12} c. Campus: Architecture and Education in the American College, 1800–2000.]

Environmental Studies 1015 {15} c. Frontier Crossings: The Western Experience in American History. Spring 2014. Matthew Klingle.

What accounts for the persistence of the “frontier myth” in American history, and why do Americans continue to find the idea so attractive? Explores the creation of and disputes over what became of the western United States from 1763 to the present. Topics include Euro-American relations with Native Americans; the creation of borders and national identities; the effect of nature and ideology; the role of labor and gender in the backcountry; and the enduring influence of frontier imagery in popular culture. (Same as History 1020 {15}.)

[Film Studies 1025 {10} c. Cultural Difference and the Crime Film.]

Film Studies 1043 {23} c. East Asian Genre Cinema: Action, Anime, and Martial Arts. Fall 2013. Shu-chin Tsui.

Explores East Asian cinema from a genre perspective with a focus on Hong Kong action, Japanese anime, and transnational martial arts films. In the framework of social-cultural history and context of genre theory, examines the paradigms that characterize the form and content of such films; investigates the relations between local-global and national-transnational; studies genre-specific issues such as spectators’ perception or industry practices to discern the role of gender, nation, power, and historiography. After taking the course, students will be able to explain the theoretical concepts of genre cinema, analyze the genre’s visual formation, and comprehend the social-cultural implications of the genre. (Same as Asian Studies 1043 {23}.)

[Gay and Lesbian Studies 1027 {27} c. From Flowers of Evil to Pretty Woman: Prostitutes in Modern Western Culture. (Same as Gender and Women’s Studies 1027 {27} and German 1027 {27}.)]

Gender and Women’s Studies 1013 {26} c. Homebodies: Geography as Identity in Fiction. Fall 2013. Sarah Braunstein.

Where are you from? How does the place you’re born and raised inform your consciousness? Novels answer these questions more fully and deeply than any other kind of writing. Investigates psychological, spiritual, cultural, historical, and political meanings of home. Students read novels, stories, and essays in which place is itself a character. Questions include: How do writers create vivid, palpable places? How does a book’s setting illuminate the (often secret) lives of its characters? Special focus on the coastline, on water, and on shape-shifting landscapes that draw attention to shifting identities. Through critical and creative assignments, students analyze creative prose and write their own. By experimenting with various stylistic techniques, and by visiting sites along the Maine coast, participants seek to document past homes in a new way—and to experience a new place as home. Readings may include Virginia Woolf, Denton Welsh, James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Annie Dillard, Marilynn Robinson, Jamaica Kincaid, Bonnie Nadzam, Eowyn Ivy, and others. (Same as English 1013 {12}.)

Gender and Women’s Studies 1014 {30} b. Mothers, Sisters, and Facebook Friends: Is Feminism a Dysfunctional Family? Fall 2013. Susan Faludi.

Recently, women have begun to claim power formerly held by men. Yet in politics, work, and the family, women are so often unable to pass down power from one woman to the next—with the effect that the search for women’s equality seems to begin anew with every generation. How to explain this inability to create a “mother-daughter” succession? And why does “sisterhood” so often turn poisonous? Explores feminism’s generational breakdown from a variety of perspectives—political, cultural, psychological—and traces its roots in history, from Republican Motherhood to radical feminism to Facebook’s “Lean In” circles.

Gender and Women’s Studies 1022 {22} c. “Bad” Women Make Great History: Gender, Identity, and Society in Modern Europe, 1789–1945. Fall 2013. Page Herrlinger.

Focuses on the lives and works of path-breaking women who defied the norms of modern European society in order to assume extraordinary and often controversial identities in a range of fields—as writers, scientists, performers, athletes, soldiers, and social and political activists. What does each woman’s “deviance” reveal about cultural constructions of identity and the self in Modern Europe? About contemporary views on issues such as women’s work, gender relations, education, marriage, sexuality, motherhood, health, and the struggle for civil and political rights? And when studied together, what do these women’s experiences tell us about patterns of change and continuity with respect to definitions of masculinity vs. femininity, the public vs. private sphere, and the relationship of the individual to the modern state? (Same as History 1012 {22}.)

[Gender and Women’s Studies 1027 {27} c. From Flowers of Evil to Pretty Woman: Prostitutes in Modern Western Culture. (Same as Gay and Lesbian Studies 1027 {27} and German 1027 {27}.)]

[German 1027 {27} c. From Flowers of Evil to Pretty Woman: Prostitutes in Modern Western Culture. (Same as Gay and Lesbian Studies 1027 {27} and Gender and Women’s Studies 1027 {27}.)]

[Government 1000 {21} b. Citizenship and Representation in American Politics.]

Government 1001 {25} b. Representation, Participation, and Power in American Politics. Fall 2013. Janet M. Martin.

An introductory seminar in American national politics. Readings, papers, and discussion explore the changing nature of power and participation in the American polity, with a focus on the interaction between individuals (non-voters, voters, party leaders, members of Congress, the President) and political institutions (parties, Congress, the executive branch, the judiciary). Not open to students who have credit for or are concurrently taking Government 1100 {150}.

Government 1002 {27} b. Political Leadership. Fall 2013. Andrew C. Rudalevige.

We talk about political leadership all the time, mostly to complain about its absence. Leadership is surely one of the key elements of politics, but what does it mean? Do we know it when we see it? What kinds of leaders do we have, and what kinds do we want? How do modern democratic conceptions of governance mesh with older visions of authority? Of ethics? Looks both at real world case studies and the treatment of leadership in literature. Offers a wide variety of perspectives on leadership and the opportunities and dangers it presents—both for those who want to lead, and for those who are called upon to follow.

Government 1011 {26} b. Fundamental Questions: Exercises in Political Theory. Fall 2013. Jean M. Yarbrough.

Explores the fundamental questions in political life: What is justice? What is happiness? Are human beings equal or unequal by nature? Do they even have a nature, or are they “socially constructed”? Are there ethical standards for political action that exist prior to law and, if so, where do they come from? Nature? God? History? Readings may include Plato, Aristotle, the Bible, Machiavelli, Locke, Rousseau, Shakespeare, the American Founders, Tocqueville, and Nietzsche.

[Government 1012 {28} b. Human Being and Citizen.]

Government 1016 {29} b. How to Rule the World. Fall 2013. Shilo Brooks.

Explores what may well be the highest political theme: the requirements of great political rule. What must we do in order to govern well? Even more important, what must we know? Should we be guided by the concern for justice—for human rights, for example—or by the sometimes unpleasing demands of what can politely be called “national security”? Does great political leadership in democratic times differ in any important way from that seen in the great nations of the past? With these and related questions in mind, students read, reflect on, and write carefully about a handful of foundational texts that all deal, in very different ways, with the question of the requirements of great political leadership. Readings include Lincoln, Machiavelli, Shakespeare, Xenophon, Plato, the Bible.

Government 1025 {18} b. NGOs in Politics. Fall 2013. Laura A. Henry.

Nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) are thought to play a crucial role in politics—monitoring the state, facilitating citizen participation in politics, and articulating policy alternatives. Yet the activities of NGOs vary significantly from one political system to another, most notably differing among developing and developed states and democratic and authoritarian states. In addition, NGOs’ role in the political process is being transformed by globalization and the increasingly transnational nature of political activism. Explores the following questions: How do factors such as a state’s level of economic development, its political culture, the nature of the political regime, and the arrangement of its political institutions shape NGOs’ role and influence in the political process? When and where have NGOs been successful in influencing political developments? How do the growing transnational linkages among NGOs affect their role in domestic politics?

Government 1026 {20} b. Global Media and Politics. Fall 2013. Henry C. W. Laurence.

Examines the impact of media including the Internet, newspapers, and television on politics and society in cross-national perspective. Asks how differences in the ownership and regulation of media affect how news is selected and presented, and looks at various forms of government censorship and commercial self-censorship. Also considers the role of the media and “pop culture” in creating national identities, perpetuating ethnic stereotypes, and providing regime legitimation; and explores the impact of satellite television and the Internet on rural societies and authoritarian governments.

Government 1030 {10} b. The Pursuit of Peace. Fall 2013. Allen L. Springer.

Examines different strategies for preventing and controlling armed conflict in international society, and emphasizes the role of diplomacy, international law, and international organizations in the peace-making process.

Government 1037 {11} b. The Korean War. Fall 2013. Christian P. Potholm.

The Korean War is often called “the forgotten war” because it is overshadowed by World War II and the Vietnam War, yet many important aspects and results of it are mirrored in the contemporary world. Korea is still divided and its situation as a buffer state between China, Russia, and Japan continues to have important policy ramifications for the United States. Focuses not just on the course of the war, but on the foreign policy assumptions of the two Korean governments, the United States, the People’s Republic of China, and Russia.

History 1012 {22} c. “Bad” Women Make Great History: Gender, Identity, and Society in Modern Europe, 1789–1945. Fall 2013. Page Herrlinger.

Focuses on the lives and works of path-breaking women who defied the norms of modern European society in order to assume extraordinary and often controversial identities in a range of fields—as writers, scientists, performers, athletes, soldiers, and social and political activists. What does each woman’s “deviance” reveal about cultural constructions of identity and the self in Modern Europe? About contemporary views on issues such as women’s work, gender relations, education, marriage, sexuality, motherhood, health, and the struggle for civil and political rights? And when studied together, what do these women’s experiences tell us about patterns of change and continuity with respect to definitions of masculinity vs. femininity, the public vs. private sphere, and the relationship of the individual to the modern state? (Same as Gender and Women’s Studies 1022 {22}.)

History 1014 {12} c. Utopia: Intentional Communities in America, 1630–1997. Fall 2014. Sarah McMahon.

An examination of the evolution of utopian visions and utopian experiments that begins in 1630 with John Winthrop’s “City upon a Hill,” explores the proliferation of both religious and secular communal ventures between 1780 and 1920, and concludes with an examination of twentieth-century counterculture communes, intentional communities, and dystopian separatists. Readings include primary source accounts by members (letters, diaries, essays, etc.), “community” histories and apostate exposés, utopian fiction, and scholarly historical analyses. Discussions and essays focus on teaching students how to subject primary and secondary source materials to critical analysis.

History 1016 {25} c. The Civil War in Film. Fall 2013. Patrick Rael.

Explores the American Civil War through an examination of popular films dedicated to the topic. Students analyze films as a representation of the past, considering not simply their historical subject matter, but also the cultural and political contexts in which they are made. Films include The Birth of a Nation, Gone with the Wind, Glory, and Cold Mountain. Weekly evening film screenings. (Same as Africana Studies 1025 {25}.)

History 1018 {11} c. Memoirs and Memory in American History. Fall 2013. Connie Chiang.

Examines the ways in which Americans have remembered the past and documented their experiences in individual memoirs. Considers the tensions between memory and history, the value of memoirs as historical documents, and the extent to which memories deepen, complicate, and even convolute our understanding of twentieth-century United States history. The topical focus of the seminar will vary from year to year and may include immigration, labor, gender and race relations, and war. Writing-intensive, including several short papers and a family history research paper.

History 1020 {15} c. Frontier Crossings: The Western Experience in American History. Spring 2014. Matthew Klingle.

What accounts for the persistence of the “frontier myth” in American history, and why do Americans continue to find the idea so attractive? Explores the creation of and disputes over what became of the western United States from 1763 to the present. Topics include Euro-American relations with Native Americans; the creation of borders and national identities; the effect of nature and ideology; the role of labor and gender in the backcountry; and the enduring influence of frontier imagery in popular culture. (Same as Environmental Studies 1015 {15}.)

History 1022 {14} c. Science and Society. Fall 2014. David Hecht.

Focuses on twentieth-century science, technology, and medicine. Uses a number of seminal events and ideas—evolution, nuclear weapons, environmentalism, genetics, climate change and public health—to examine changing meanings of “science.” Science is neither as objective nor as detached from society as is commonly assumed; examines the nature of its interaction with broader themes and events in twentieth-century American politics and culture.

History 1036 c. China Encounters the West. Fall 2014. Leah Zuo.

Explores the historical relationship between China and the West through examining a selection of their encounters from the seventeenth through the early twentieth centuries. Key episodes include: the Jesuit and Protestant missions, the arrival of the Industrial West (imperialism and war), the Cold War, and beyond. Examines such themes as religion and religiosity, science and technology, and the dynamics of cultural accommodation and communication. Interdisciplinary. Draws upon readings of history, the history of science, religion, and political science. Note: This course fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors. (Same as Asian Studies 1006.)

History 1040 {16} c. From Montezuma to Bin Laden: Globalization and Its Critics. Fall 2013. David Gordon.

Examines the challenge that globalization and imperialism pose for the study of history. How do historians balance the perspectives of victors and victims in past and present processes of globalization? How important are non-European versions of the past that may contradict European Enlightenment historical ideas and ideals? Class discussions interrogate questions about globalization and imperialism raised by proponents and critics, ranging from the Spanish conquest of Mexico to the American conquest of Iraq. (Same as Africana Studies 1040 {13}.)

Interdisciplinary Studies 1010 {10} b. Health Care Disparities in the United States. Fall 2013. Stephen Loebs.

Health care occupies center stage in state and national elections. Inequities in health care in the United States have a direct impact on children and adults, especially those living in poverty, as well as on the national economy. Multicultural differences on health care present barriers to improving health status. Introduces the application of different academic disciplines, such as economics, political science, and sociology, to the contours of health care policy and debates, with the following questions forming the core: Why are there inequities in such a wealthy nation as ours? Are health care inequities a fixture of our pluralistic and market based economy? What can be learned from comparison with other, similar nations? Why is so much spent on health care with questionable outcomes? Several written essays and active class participation expected.

Music 1011. Holy Songs in a Strange Land. Spring 2014. Judith Casselberry.

Examines Black American sacred music from its earliest forms, fashioned by enslaved Africans, through current iterations, produced by Black global actors of a different sort. What does bondage sound like? What does emancipation sound like? Can we hear corresponding sounds generated by artists today? In what ways have creators of sacred music embraced, rejected, and re-envisioned the “strange land” over time? Looks at musical and lyrical content and the context in which various music genres developed, such as Negro spirituals, gospel, and sacred blues. Contemporary artists Janelle Monáe, Beyoncé, and Lupe Fiasco will be included as well. (Same as Africana Studies 1019.)

Philosophy 1025 {25} c. On the Power and Limit of Persuasion. Fall 2013. Nathan Rothschild.

Examines the robust debate in Classical Athens about the power of words—both in public and private—to shape our opinions, desires, and even our character. Authors studied will include Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, Thucydides, Plato, and Aristotle. Concurrent with considering what persuasion can accomplish, explores these authors’ views concerning what it cannot. Of particular concern will be the relationship of persuasive speech to true speech, whether persuasion can lead to character change, and the dangers of false public opinion and debate. Intended in part as a philosophically inflected introduction to the thought and literature of Ancient Greece.

[Philosophy 1028 {28} c. A Philosopher’s Dozen.]

[Philosophy 1038 {18} c. Love.]

Philosophy 1040 {14} c. Personal Identity. Fall 2013. Matthew Stuart.

What is it that makes you a person, and what is it that makes you the same person as the little kid in your parents’ photo album? Philosophers have defended a number of different answers to these questions. According to some, it is persistence of the same soul that makes for personal identity. Others argue that it is persistence of the same body that matters, or the continuity of certain biological processes. Still others contend that it is psychological relations that matter. We will canvas all of these answers, and will consider thought experiments about soul swapping, brain transplants, and Star Trek transporters. Readings from both historical and contemporary sources.

[Psychology 1010 {10} b. What’s on Your Mind? An Introduction to the Brain and Behavior.]

Religion 1015 {015} c. Religion, Violence, and Secularization. Fall 2013. Elizabeth Pritchard.

Introduces the rationales and repercussions of the rise of the modern secular nation state as a solution to “religious violence,” one of the most pressing challenges of the contemporary world. In so doing, complicates the association of violence and backwardness with “religion,” and peace and progress with “secularism.” Topics include the demarcations of state and church and public and private; the relationship between skepticism and toleration; the rise of so-called “fundamentalism”; the shifting assessments of the injuriousness of religious belief, speech, and act; and the assumptions surrounding what it is that constitutes “real religion.”

[Religion 1027 {27} c. Astral Religion in the Near East and Classical Antiquity.]

Russian 1022 {22} c. “It Happens Rarely, Maybe, but It Does Happen”—Fantasy and Satire in East Central Europe. Every other fall. Fall 2014. Raymond Miller.

Explores the fantastic in Russian and East European literature from the 1830s into the late twentieth century. Studies the origins of the East European fantastic in Slavic folklore and through the Romantic movement, and traces the historical development of the genre from country to country and era to era. Examines the use of the fantastic for the purpose of satire, philosophical inquiry, and social commentary, with particular emphasis on its critiques of nationalism, modernity, and totalitarianism. Authors include Nikolai Gogol’, Mikhail Bulgakov, Karel Capek, Stanislaw Lem, and Franz Kafka.

Sociology 1010 {10} b. Racism. Fall 2013. Roy Partridge.

Examines issues of racism in the United States, with attention to the social psychology of racism, its history, its relationship to social structure, and its ethical and moral implications. (Same as Africana Studies 1010 {10}.)

Theater 1010 {10} c. Understanding Theater and Dance: Doing, Viewing, and Reviewing.
Fall 2014. The Department of Theater and Dance.

The goal is appreciation and understanding of contemporary performance. Investigates critical perspectives on dance, drama, and other performance events. Develops viewing and writing skills: description, analysis, interpretation, evaluation. Attending live performances, on and off campus, watching films and videos, and participating in studio workshops with performers and writers provide a basis for four essays and other modes of critical

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