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English – Courses

First-Year Seminars in English Composition and Literature

These courses are open to first-year students. The main purpose of the first-year seminars (no matter what the topic or reading list) is to give first-year students extensive practice in reading and writing analytically. Each seminar is normally limited to sixteen students and includes discussion, outside reading, frequent papers, and individual conferences on writing problems. For a full description of first-year seminars, see the First-Year Seminar section.

1003 {10} c. Shakespeare’s Afterlives. Fall 2013. Aaron Kitch.

1013 {12} c. Homebodies: Geography as Identity in Fiction. Fall 2013. Sarah Braunstein. (Same as Gender and Women’s Studies 1013 {26}.)

1016 {13} c. Hawthorne. Fall 2013. William Watterson.

1026 {26} c. Fictions of Freedom. Fall 2013. Tess Chakkalakal. (Same as Africana Studies 1026 {16}.)

1041 {21} c. Arab and Jew in Literature and Film. Spring 2014. Marilyn Reizbaum.

1042 {22} c. Transfigurations of Song. Fall 2013. David Collings.

1043 {29} c. Fact and Fiction. Fall 2013. Brock Clarke.

1046 {24} c. After Kafka. Fall 2013. Hilary Thompson.

1047 {23} c. Early European Representations of Islam. Fall 2013. Emma Maggie Solberg.

1048 {25} c. Contemporary Short Fiction in English. Fall 2013. Celeste Goodridge.

Introductory Courses in Literature

1100–1199 {104–110}. Primarily intended for first- and second-year students, and for juniors and seniors with no prior experience in college literature courses. (Specific content and focus of each course will vary with the instructor.)

[1104 {104} c. From Page to Screen: Film Adaptation and Narrative. (Same as Film Studies 1104 {104}.)]

1105 {105} c. Introduction to Poetry. Fall 2013. Peter Coviello.

Aims to understand poetry’s varied workings, considering, most extensively, the basic materials—words, lines, metaphors, sentences—from which poems have traditionally been assembled. By studying closely the components of meter, diction, syntax and line, rhyme, and figure—in essence, how poems work—aims to see more clearly into the ends poems work for: meaning, rhapsody, transport, etc.

1106 {106} c. Introduction to Drama. Spring 2014. William Watterson.

Traces the development of dramatic form, character, and style from classical Greece through the Renaissance and Enlightenment to contemporary America and Africa. Explores the evolution of plot design, with special attention to the politics of playing, the shifting strategies of representing human agency, and contemporary relationships between the theater and a variety of forms of mass media. Authors may include Sophocles, Aristophanes, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Dryden, Ibsen, Wilde, Beckett, Mamet, and Churchill. (Same as Theater 1806 {106}.)

1107 {107} c - ESD. Introduction to African American Literary Fiction. Spring 2015. Tess Chakkalakal.

Introduces students to the literary and historical aspects of the black novel as it developed in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century in the United States. Begins with a consideration of the novels of Charles Chesnutt, Sutton Griggs, and Pauline Hopkins, then examines the ways in which novelists of the Harlem Renaissance—James Weldon Johnson, Nella Larsen, and W. E. B. Du Bois—played with both the form and function of the novel during this era. Then considers how novels by Richard Wright, Chester Himes, and Ralph Ellison challenged and reformed the black novel’s historical scope and aesthetic aims. (Same as Africana Studies 1107 {107}).

1114 {114} c. Introduction to Narrative. Spring 2014. Elizabeth Muther.

Explores the shapes and seductions of narrative, the stories we dream and imagine, tell or are told. Considers plot design, narrative time, and the history of narrative forms. Of special interest are narrative desire, suspense and suspicion; and graphic fiction and sequential art.

Courses in Composition

1060 {60} c. English Composition. Fall 2013. Belinda Kong. Spring 2014. Guy Mark Foster and Ann Kibbie.

Practice in developing the skills needed to write and revise college-level expository essays. Explores the close relationship between critical reading and writing. Assignment sequences and different modes of analysis and response enable students to write fully developed expository essays. Does not count toward the major or minor in English.

Introductory Courses in Creative Writing

1228 {128} c. Introductory Fiction Workshop. Fall 2013 and Spring 2014. Brock Clarke.

Begins with an examination of some technical aspects of fiction writing. In particular, considers those that we tend to take for granted as readers and need to understand better as writers, e.g., point of view, characterization, dialogue, foreshadowing, scene, and summary. Students read and discuss published stories, and work through a series of exercises to write their own stories. Workshop discussion is an integral part.

1240 {126} c. Creative Nonfiction Writing. Fall 2013. Jaed Coffin.

Explores a range of creative nonfiction from the personal essay to new journalism with an emphasis on the elements of structure, voice, and style. Students will read and discuss published nonfiction and write their own narratives. Students are expected to fully participate in weekly workshop discussions.

Advanced Courses in Creative Writing

2852 {216} c. Creative Writing: Poetry II. Fall 2013. Anthony Walton.

Builds upon the method of studying and crafting poetry encountered in English 1225 {125}. Students exposed to advanced methods of writing and interpretation, including the in-depth study of one particular poet’s oeuvre and evolution. Students encouraged to develop a more comprehensive view of their own individual poetic practices. Each week students responsible for evaluating the assigned reading and for writing poems. Preference given to students who have successfully completed English 1225 {125}.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

2853 {217} c. Advanced Fiction Workshop. Spring 2014. Brock Clarke.

Presumes a familiarity with the mechanics of fiction and, ideally, previous experience in a fiction workshop. Uses published stories and stories by students to explore questions of voice and tone, structure and plot, how to deepen one’s characters, and how to make stories resonate at a higher level. Students write several stories during the semester and revise at least one. Workshop discussion and critiques are an integral part.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

Intermediate Seminars in English and American Literature

These seminars are open to both majors and non-majors—and are normally limited to sixteen students. They provide opportunities for students to focus intensively on critical reading and writing skills and to learn advanced research methods. Each seminar explores a unique topic while introducing students to literary theory and other critical paradigms and tools of literary studies.

2002 {208} c. Victorian Urban Narratives. Spring 2014. Aviva Briefel.

Seminar. An exploration of London as space and character in Victorian literary narratives. Considers such topics as the intersections between identity and urban setting; the relationship between genre and literary space; and the overlaps in mappings of cities and narrative. Consideration of literary and cultural theory and criticism is central. Authors may include Conrad, Dickens, Dixon, Doyle, Gissing, Marsh, and Wilde. (Same as Gay and Lesbian Studies 2002 {202} and Gender and Women’s Studies 2202 {202}.)

Prerequisite: One first-year seminar or course numbered 1100–1999 {100–199} in English.

2003 {219} c. Trolls, Frogs, and Princesses: Fairy Tales and Retellings. Fall 2013. Elizabeth Muther.

Seminar. Explores the resiliency of fairy tales across cultural boundaries and historical time. Traces the genealogical origins of the classic tales, as well as their metamorphoses in historical and contemporary variants, fractured tales, and adaptations in literature and film. Engages a spectrum of related texts in literary and cultural theory and criticism.

Prerequisite: One first-year seminar or course numbered 1100–1999 {100–199} in English.

2006 {200} c. Getting Real : The Development of Literary Realism. Fall 2013. Marilyn Reizbaum.

Seminar. Examines the development of literary Realism in English letters. Considers the wider movement in the arts, in particular the visual arts, taking into account, in photography, for example, the scientific propositions that underlie certain theories of the “real” or “objective reality.” Touches on theoretical debates surrounding the genre. Authors may include Ruskin, Dickens, Hardy, Peter Brooks, Virginia Woolf, Sherwood Anderson, Susan Sontag, Erich Auerbach, Lorrie Moore, and Frederick Wiseman.

Prerequisite: One first-year seminar or course numbered 1100–1999 {100–199} in English.

2007 c. The Monstrosity of Revolution: Radicalism and Reaction in British Literature, 1789–1834. Spring 2014. David Collings.

Seminar. Examines the rise of and responses to radical writing in the wake of the French Revolution, with a particular focus on the many contexts informing the novel Frankenstein. Focuses on the emergence of feminist critique, radical fiction, philosophical anarchism, and the poetics of non-violent resistance, as well as the defense of tradition and the depiction of revolution as monstrosity. Discusses such authors as Burke, Wollstonecraft, Godwin, Rousseau, and Percy and Mary Shelley in tandem with contemporary critical essays. (Same as Gender and Women’s Studies 2607.)

Prerequisite: One first-year seminar or course numbered 1100–1999 {100–199} in English or gender and women’s studies.

2008 c. Chaucer’s Dreams. Spring 2014. Emma Maggie Solberg.

Seminar. Introduces students to the work of Geoffrey Chaucer (“the father of English poetry,” as Dryden called him) by way of his dream visions, poems in which the poet-dreamer drifts off to sleep and explores, via medieval astral projection, fantastical mental landscapes. In his dreams, Chaucer visits magical gardens full of talking birds, outer space (“the Galaxie, / which men clepeth [call] the Milky Wey”), and the virtual realities of his favorite books, like Virgil’s Aeneid and Ovid’s Metamorphoses. In order to fully comprehend Chaucer’s allusions, students read his dream visions in the contexts of their sources and analogues; in other words, following Chaucer’s guide to medieval learning. Students will gain reading proficiency in Middle English; no previous experience with Middle English necessary. In the spirit of Chaucer’s dream visions, which creatively reimagine and adapt older literature, students can opt to substitute creative projects for their final independent research paper. Texts include: Chaucer’s The Book of the Duchess, The Parliament of Fowls, The House of Fame, and The Legend of Good Women; Cicero’s Dream of Scipio, Boethius’s Consolation of Philosophy, and Le Roman de la rose (The Romance of the Rose). Note: This course fulfills the pre-1800 literature requirement for English majors.

Prerequisite: One first-year seminar or course numbered 1100–1999 {100–199} in English.

Advanced Courses in English and American Literature

2107 {204} c. Introduction to Medieval British Literature. Fall 2013. Emma Maggie Solberg.

Introduces students to the literature of medieval Britain, excluding Chaucer. Begins with the first poem ever written in English (or rather Old English), continues through tribal sagas (Beowulf, the Welsh Mabinogian, the Irish Tain) and Arthurian romances (the Lais of Marie de France, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight), and concludes with extensive coverage of the literature of the fifteenth century: mystical theology (The Showings of Julian of Norwich, The Cloud of Unknowing), gory martyrdoms (Christina the Astonishing, the York Passion Play), lyric poetry ranging from the numinous to the obscene (anonymous and by poets including Dunbar and Skelton), the global travel narrative of Sir John Mandeville, and tales of Robin Hood. Students will gain a very rudimentary ability to translate Old English as well as reading proficiency in Middle English. Note: This course fulfills the pre-1800 literature requirement for English majors.

Prerequisite: One first-year seminar or course numbered 1100–1999 {100–199} in English.

2108 c. Medieval Drama. Spring 2014. Emma Maggie Solberg.

Knowledge of theater history tends to skip from the tragedies of Ancient Greece to Shakespeare’s Renaissance, leaving the Middle Ages in dark obscurity. Aims to illuminate the underappreciated treasure trove of medieval drama, a genre that flourished across Europe for more than five centuries. Texts range from the tenth-century work of the female playwright Hrotswitha (“Strong-Voice”) to sixteenth-century English drama banned by the Protestant Reformation. Reading also spans a wide variety of genres: bloody martyrdoms, dirty farces, Robin Hood plays, romances of knights and ladies, moralities, and mysteries. Students will gain reading proficiency in Middle English; no previous experience with Middle English necessary. Texts include: Hrotswitha of Gandersheim’s Dulcitius, “Robyn Hod and the Shryff of Notyngham,” “Farce nouvelle et fort joyeuse du Pect” (“The Farce of the Fart”), the York Cycle, Mankind, and Fulgens and Lucrece. Note: This course fulfills the pre-1800 literature requirement for English majors.

Prerequisite: One first-year seminar or course numbered 1100–1999 {100–199} in English.

2150 {210} c. Shakespeare’s Comedies and Romances. Fall 2013. William Watterson.

Examines A Midsummer Night’s Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Twelfth Night, As You Like It, The Winter’s Tale, and The Tempest in light of Renaissance genre theory. Note: This course fulfills the pre-1800 literature requirement for English majors. (Same as Theater 2810 {210}.)

Prerequisite: One first-year seminar or course numbered 1100–1999 {100–199} in English.

2151 {211} c. Shakespeare’s Tragedies and Roman Plays. Spring 2014. William Watterson.

Examines Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth, King Lear, Julius Caesar, Antony and Cleopatra, and Coriolanus in light of recent critical thought. Special attention is given to psychoanalysis, new historicism, and genre theory. Note: This course fulfills the pre-1800 literature requirement for English majors. (Same as Theater 2811 {211}.)

Prerequisite: One first-year seminar or course numbered 1100–1999 {100–199} in English.

2200 {223} c - VPA. English Renaissance Drama. Fall 2013. Aaron Kitch.

Explores the explosion of popular drama in London following the construction of the first permanent theaters in the 1560s. Pays special attention to the forms of drama that audiences liked best—those portraying revenge, marriage, middle-class ascendancy, and adultery. Topics include the cultural space of the theater, the structure of playing companies, and the cultivation of blank verse as a vehicle for theatrical expression. Students will master the styles of different playwrights, examine the topography of the Globe theater, and try out different staging techniques. Authors include Shakespeare, Thomas Kyd, Christopher Marlowe, Ben Jonson, and Thomas Middleton. Note: This course fulfills the pre-1800 literature requirement for English majors. (Same as Theater 2823 {223}.)

Prerequisite: One first-year seminar or course numbered 1100–1999 {100–199} in English.

2290 {229} c. Milton. Fall 2013. Ann Kibbie.

A critical study of Milton’s major works in poetry and prose, with special emphasis on Paradise Lost. Note: This course fulfills the pre-1800 literature requirement for English majors.

Prerequisite: One first-year seminar or course numbered 1100–1999 {100–199} in English.

2304 {231} c. Age of Satire. Spring 2014. Ann Kibbie.

Explores various forms of satire and parody in the prose, poetry, drama, and visual art of the Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, as well as the various attempts to censor or otherwise control satire. Works will include Alexander Pope’s Rape of the Lock, John Gay’s Beggar’s Opera, Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels, Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones, and the paintings and prints of William Hogarth. Note: This course fulfills the pre-1800 literature requirement for English majors.

Prerequisite: One first-year seminar or course numbered 1100–1999 {100–199} in English.

2351 {236} c. Romantic Sexualities. Spring 2014. David Collings.

Investigates constructions of sexuality in English romantic writing. Examines tales of seduction by supernatural or demonic figures; the sexualized world of the Gothic; the Byronic hero; lyrical depictions of incest; the yearning for an eroticized muse or goddess; and same-sex desire in travel writing, diaries, and realist fiction. Discusses the place of such writing in the history of sexual identities, repression, the unconscious, and the sublime. Authors may include Burke, Lewis, Mary Shelley, Byron, Wollstonecraft, Lister, Austen, Coleridge, Keats, and Percy Shelley, with further readings in queer theory and the history of sexuality. (Same as Gay and Lesbian Studies 2351 {236} and Gender and Women’s Studies 2234 {234}.)

Prerequisite: One first-year seminar or course numbered 1100–1999 {100–199} in English or gender and women’s studies, or Gay and Lesbian Studies 2001 {201}.

2353 {237} c. Contesting the Commons. Fall 2013. David Collings.

Examines the attack on and defense of common right in the era of the Industrial Revolution in England. Discusses historical phenomena such as food riots, the enclosure of commons, the Luddite protests, the emergence of a mass radical movement, the massacre at Peterloo, and the formation of modern class relations. Focuses on radical poems by plebeians, artisans, and elite writers (Blake, Spence, Hone, Shelley, Clare), writings of the Luddites, popular radical journalism (Cobbett), and pivotal texts in the history of political and economic thought (Burke, Malthus, Marx), alongside readings in history and cultural theory.

Prerequisite: One first-year seminar or course numbered 1100–1999 {100–199} in English.

2405 c. Victorian Plots. Spring 2014. Aviva Briefel.

Focusing primarily on the novel, this course examines Victorian narrative form. Considers whether there are certain types of plots that are peculiar to the period; the ways in which characters develop (or not) as stories unravel; and how literary elements such as description, dialogue, and setting emerge in Victorian texts. Along the way, analyzes the economic, social, and cultural factors that determine aspects of the novel. Authors may include Emily Brontë, Wilkie Collins, Charles Dickens, George Eliot, Elizabeth Gaskell, and Anthony Trollope.

Prerequisite: One first-year seminar or course numbered 1100–1999 {100–199} in English.

2426 {289} c. The Horror Film in Context. Fall 2013. Aviva Briefel.

Examines the genre of the horror film in a range of cultural, theoretical, and literary contexts. Considers the ways in which horror films represent violence, fear, and paranoia; their creation of identity categories; their intersection with contemporary politics; and their participation in such major literary and cinematic genres as the gothic, comedy, and family drama. Texts may include works by Craven, Cronenberg, De Palma, Freud, Hitchcock, Kristeva, Kubrick, Poe, Romero, and Shelley. (Same as Film Studies 2426 {287}, Gay and Lesbian Studies 2426 {287}, and Gender and Women’s Studies 2426 {287}.)

Prerequisite: One of the following: one first-year seminar or course numbered 1100–1999 {100–199} in English or gender and women’s studies; or Film Studies 1101 {101}, 2201 {201}, or 2202 {202}.

2451 {245} c. Modernism/Modernity. Fall 2013. Marilyn Reizbaum.

Examines the cruxes of the “modern,” and the term’s shift into a conceptual category rather than a temporal designation. Although not confined to a particular national or generic rubric, takes British works as a focus. Organized by movements or critical formations of the modern, i.e., modernisms, psychoanalysis, postmodernism, cultural critique. Readings of critical literature in conjunction with primary texts. Authors/directors/works may include T. S. Eliot, Joyce’s Dubliners, Lawrence’s Sons and Lovers, Sontag’s On Photography, W. G. Sebald’s The Natural History of Destruction, Ian McEwen’s Enduring Love, Stevie Smith, Kureishi’s My Son the Fanatic, and Coetzee’s Disgrace. (Same as Gay and Lesbian Studies 2451 {245} and Gender and Women’s Studies 2247 {247}.)

Prerequisite: One first-year seminar or course numbered 1100–1999 {100–199} in English, gay and lesbian studies, or gender and women’s studies.

2453 {247} c. The Irish Story. Spring 2014. Marilyn Reizbaum.

Considers Irish writing from the late nineteenth century through the present, including its contribution to modern literary movements, conflictual relation to the idea of a national Irish literature, and intersections with other Celtic literatures (Scottish). Likely topics include linguistic and national dispossession; the supernatural or surreal, pastoral, and urban traditions; the Celtic Twilight versus Modernism; and the interaction of feminism and nationalism.

Prerequisite: One first-year seminar or course numbered 1100–1999 {100–199} in English

2502 {252} c. American Intimacies: Sex and Love in Nineteenth-Century Literature. Spring 2014. Peter Coviello.

Homosexuality and its conceptual twin, heterosexuality, are surprisingly late coinages. So what was sex like before such concepts organized the sphere of intimate life in America? Was it a set of bodily practices? An aspect of a person’s identity? Was sexuality something an individual could be said to possess? What forms of contact, invest attachment, or imagination could even be counted as sex, and why? Authors may include Whitman, Thoreau, Jewett, Melville, Hawthorne, James, Douglas, Dickinson, and Joseph Smith. Note: This course fulfills the literature of the Americas requirement for English majors. (Same as Gay and Lesbian Studies 2502 {252} and Gender and Women’s Studies 2252 {252}.)

Prerequisite: One first-year seminar or course numbered 1100–1999 {100–199} in English.

2504 c. Nineteenth-Century American Fiction. Spring 2014. Tess Chakkalakal.

Historical survey of nineteenth-century American fiction, including works by Washington Irving, Catherine Sedgwick, Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Frank Webb, Harriet Beecher Stowe, William Wells Brown, Mark Twain, Frank Norris, Henry James, John DeForest, Edith Wharton, William Dean Howells, and Charles Chesnutt. Note: This course fulfills the literature of the Americas requirement for English majors. (Same as Africana Studies 2504.)

Prerequisite: One first-year seminar or course numbered 1100–1999 {100–199} in English or Africana studies.

2541 {254} c. Twentieth-Century American Poetry. Spring 2014. Celeste Goodridge.

Readings of contemporary poetic projects with an emphasis on different modes of poetic influence, the role of high and low culture in these canons and the role of narrative, biography, mythology, and performativity. Poets may include Philip Levine, Mark Doty, Louise Gluck, Laurie Scheck, and Amy Clampitt.

Prerequisite: One first-year seminar or course numbered 1100–1999 {100–199} in English.

2570 {250} c - ESD. The Making of a Race: Latino Fictions. Fall 2013. Nadia V. Celis.

Explores the creation, representation, and marketing of U.S. Latino/a identities in American literature and popular culture from the 1960s. Focuses on the experience of artists and writers of Puerto Rican, Cuban, and Dominican origin; their negotiations with notions of race, class, gender, and sexuality in the United States; and their role in the struggle for social rights, in cultural translation, and in the marketing of ethnic identities, as portrayed in a variety of works ranging from movies and songs to poetry and narrative. Authors include Pietri, Blades, Álvarez, Hijuelos, Braschi, Ovejas, Díaz, and Quiñones. Readings and writing in English, discussions in Spanish. Spanish speaking skills required. (Same as Latin American Studies 2005 {250} and Spanish 2505 {250}.)

2571 {221} c - ESD. The Making of a Race: Latino Fictions. Fall 2013. Nadia V. Celis.

Explores the creation, representation, and marketing of U.S. Latino/a identities in American literature and popular culture from the 1960s. Focuses on the experience of artists and writers of Puerto Rican, Cuban, and Dominican origin; their negotiations with notions of race, class, gender, and sexuality in the United States; and their role in the struggle for social rights, in cultural translation, and in the marketing of ethnic identities, as portrayed in a variety of works ranging from movies and songs to poetry and narrative. Authors include Pietri, Blades, Álvarez, Hijuelos, Braschi, Ovejas, Díaz, and Quiñones. Readings in English, discussions and writing in Spanish. (Same as Latin American Studies 3005 {305} and Spanish 3005 {305}.)

Prerequisite: Spanish 2409 {209} (same as Latin American Studies 2409 {209}) or 2410 {210} (same as Latin American Studies 2410 {210}).

2580 {258} c - ESD. Reconstructing the Nation. Fall 2014. Tess Chakkalakal.

Introduces students to American literature written between 1865 and 1910. Exploring a period marked by the end of the Civil War, Reconstruction, the “New” South, and Jim Crow, students engage with these historical developments through a reading of a wide range of novels, short stories, poems, and plays that take up political tensions between the North and South as well as questions of regional, racial, and national identity. Focuses on works by George Washington Cable, Charles Chesnutt, Lydia Maria Child, Sarah Orne Jewett, Mark Twain, Sutton E. Griggs, Emily Dickinson, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Henry James, Theodore Dreiser, and Frank Norris that constitute the “major” literary voices of the period; but also examines a number of “minor” works that are similarly, but perhaps more narrowly, concerned with questions of race and nation. Note: This course fulfills the literature of the Americas requirement for English majors. (Same as Africana Studies 2580 {258}.)

Prerequisite: One first-year seminar or course numbered 1100–1999 {100–199} in English or Africana studies.

2583 {264} c. Literature of the Civil War Era. Spring 2015. Tess Chakkalakal.

Examines literature published in the United States between 1861 and 1865, with particular emphasis on the wartime writings of Louisa May Alcott, William Wells Brown, Frederick Douglass, William Gilmore Simms, Herman Melville, and Walt Whitman. Students also consider writings of less well-known writers of the period found in popular magazines such as Harper’s Monthly, The Atlantic Monthly, The Southern Illustrated News, and Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper. Note: This course fulfills the literature of the Americas requirement for English majors. (Same as Africana Studies 2583 {283}.)

Prerequisite: One first-year seminar or course numbered 1100–1999 {100–199} in English.

2584 c. The Afterlives of Uncle Tom. Spring 2014. Tess Chakkalakal and Peter Coviello.

Considers the intertwined fates of slavery and sentiment in the lead-up to, and the years following, the Civil War. At its center is Harriet Beecher Stowe’s 1852 Uncle Tom’s Cabin. Tracks the ramifying effects of this antebellum mega-bestseller in such disparate realms as literary and print culture, political counter-publics, and law. Explores in particular how responses to the novel in Southern, British, and African-American literary discourses ring complex changes on the major tropes of Stowe’s novel, and on the received wisdom about Uncle Tom that persists into today. Note: This course fulfills the literature of the Americas requirement for English majors. (Same as Africana Studies 2584.)

2603 {270} c - ESD. African American Fiction: Humor and Resistance. Fall 2013. Elizabeth Muther.

Explores rich traditions of African American humor in fiction, comics, graphic narratives, and film. Considers strategies of cultural survival and liberation, as well as folkloric sources, trickster storytellers, comic double-voicing, and the lampooning of racial ideologies. Close attention paid to modes of burlesque, satirical deformation, caricature, tragicomedy, and parody in historical and contemporary contexts, including such writers and performers as Charles Chesnutt, Bert Williams, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Pryor, Ishmael Reed, Aaron McGruder, Dave Chappelle, and Suzan-Lori Parks. Note: This course fulfills the literature of the Americas requirement for English majors. (Same as Africana Studies 2603 {270}.)

Prerequisite: One first-year seminar or course numbered 1100–1999 {100–199} in English or Africana studies.

2651 {276} c - ESD. Queer Race. Fall 2013. Guy Mark Foster.

How does the concept of “queerness” signify in cultural texts that are ostensibly about the struggle for racial equality? And vice versa, how does the concept of “racialization” signify in cultural texts that are ostensibly about the struggle for LGBT recognition and justice? While some of this work tends to reduce “queer” to traditional sexual minorities like lesbigay and trans folk while downplaying racial considerations, others tend to limit the category “race” to people of color like blacks while downplaying questions about sexuality. Such critical and creative gestures often place “queer” and “race” in opposition rather than as intersecting phenomena. Students examine the theoretical and cultural assumptions of such gestures, and their implications, through close readings of selected works in both the LGBT and African American literary traditions. Note: This course fulfills the literature of the Americas requirement for English majors. (Same as Africana Studies 2651 {276} and Gay and Lesbian Studies 2651 {276}.)

Prerequisite: One first-year seminar or course numbered 1100–1999 {100–199} in English, Africana studies, or gay and lesbian studies.

2654 {263} c. Staging Blackness. Spring 2014. Guy Mark Foster.

Examines the history and contributions of African Americans to United States theater from the early blackface minstrel tradition, to the revolutionary theater of the Black Arts writers, to more recent postmodernist stage spectacles. Among other concerns, such works often dramatize the efforts of African Americans to negotiate ongoing tensions between individual needs and group demands that result from historically changing forms of racial marginalization. Highlights in particular what Kimberly Benston has termed the “expressive agency” with which black writers and performers have imbued their theatrical presentations. Potential authors studied include: Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, Lorraine Hansberry, Amiri Baraka, Ron Milner, Adrienne Kennedy, Ntozake Shange, George C. Wolfe, Anna Deavere Smith, Afro Porno Homos, and August Wilson. (Same as Africana Studies 2630 {263}.)

Prerequisite: One first-year seminar or course numbered 1100–1999 {100–199} in English or Africana studies.

2700 {280} c - ESD, IP. The Animal and the Human. Fall 2013. Hilary Thompson.

Considers the changing philosophical and political significance of representations of the animal and of human/animal interactions in modern and contemporary literature. Focuses on global fiction and investigates the role of the animal in the theories and philosophies of psychoanalysis, biopolitics, shamanism, and animism.

Prerequisite: One first-year seminar or course numbered 1100–1999 {100–199} in English.

2701 {285} c - ESD, IP. Global Fiction and “The Great Game.” Spring 2014. Hilary Thompson.

Examines recent Anglophone global fiction’s return to the “Great Game” metaphor—originally referring to Britain and Russia’s 1813–1907 imperial rivalry over central Asia—now revived in contemporary works that, playing off past genres of espionage and adventure, figure global politics as a competitive game and imagine its space as a playing field. Considers the effects of colonialism, globalization, and 9/11 on this literature as well as, conversely, this literature’s influence on our perceptions of global politics. Authors may include Rushdie, Ghosh, Aslam, Khan, Farrell, Ondaatje, Hanif, and Shamsie.

Prerequisite: One first-year seminar or course numbered 1100–1999 {100–199} in English.

2757 {275} - ESD. Asian America: History, Society, Literature. Fall 2013. Connie Chiang, Belinda Kong, and Nancy Riley.

Focuses on Asian American experiences from an interdisciplinary perspective, including history, English, Asian studies, and sociology. Examines major issues in the experience of Asian Americans including immigration, the politics of racial/ethnic formation and identity, the political and economic forces that have shaped the lives of Asians in the United States, historical experiences and influences on today’s situation, and ways that Asian Americans have resisted and accommodated these influences. Uses a variety of lenses to gain critical perspective, including history, social relations and practices, and cultural production. (Same as Asian Studies 2805 {251}, History 2162 {268}, and Sociology 2266 {266}.)

2758 c - ESD. New Fictions of Asian America. Spring 2014. Belinda Kong.

Surveys developments in Asian American literature since 2000, and asks how post-millennial fictions revise and extend the core concerns of earlier writing. If Asian American writers have long been preoccupied with questions of ethnic identity and national belonging, recent works tackle these themes within new contexts of transnationalism, the post-9/11 security state, and the global financial crisis. Considers the diverse functions of the contemporary Asian American novel—as autobiography and narrative of racial passing, as social satire and tragicomedy, and as cultural memory and multiracial national history. (Same as Asian Studies 2806.)

Prerequisite: One first-year seminar or course numbered 1100–1999 {100–199} in English or one course in Asian studies.

2841 {282} c. Introduction to Literary and Cultural Theory. Spring 2014. Aaron Kitch.

Explores some of the most important and compelling schools of literary and cultural theory from the past two centuries as they have defined modern and postmodern intellectual life. Situates critical movements such as psychoanalysis, feminism, structuralism, deconstruction, race theory, and cultural studies in their historical and intellectual context while examining both textual and non-textual case studies. Students will develop research projects based on our readings but tailored to their own interests and knowledge. Authors include Marx, Freud, Adorno, Benjamin, Lacan, Foucault, Jameson, Eagleton, Butler, Sedgwick, and Žižek.

Prerequisite: One first-year seminar or course numbered 1100–1999 {100–199} in English, Africana studies, or gender and women’s studies; or Gay and Lesbian Studies 2001 {201}.

2850 {214} c - VPA. Playwriting. Fall 2015. The Department of Theater and Dance.

A writing workshop for contemporary performance that includes introductory exercises in writing dialogue, scenes, and solo performance texts, then moves to the writing (and rewriting) of a short play. Students read plays and performance scripts, considering how writers use image, action, speech, and silence; how they structure plays and performance pieces; and how they approach character and plot. (Same as Theater 2401 {260}.)

Prerequisite: One course numbered 1100–1999 {100–199} in theater or dance, or permission of the instructor.

2970–2973 {291–294} c. Intermediate Independent Study in English. The Department.

2999 {299} c. Intermediate Collaborative Study in English. The Department.

Advanced Seminars in English and American Literature

3000–3999 {300–350}. Advanced Literary Study.

English courses (numbered 3000–3999 {300–399}) are advanced seminars. Students who take them are normally English majors and are strongly encouraged to take one intermediate seminar (at the 2000 {200} level) before registering for these courses. Their content and perspective varies—the emphasis may be thematic, historical, generic, biographical, etc. All require extensive reading in primary and collateral materials.

3019 {339} c. The End of Blackness? Fall 2013. Guy Mark Foster.

Seminar. What makes a work of literature “black”? Is it the fact that its author can be clearly identified in racial terms, its subject matter, or its main characters? What if only one of these things can be determined, but not the others? How have the passing of Jim Crow segregation, the election of the first African American president, and changing racial norms impacted the coherence and legibility of the African American literary tradition? Students engage scholarly debates on these matters, as well as analyze past and present works of literature that aid us in examining some of the key assumptions that have (re)defined the field, including questions of literary mode, genre, and style. Possible authors include Toni Morrison, Percival Everett, Colson Whitehead, Debra Dickerson, among others. (Same as Africana Studies 3019 {339}.)

Prerequisite: One course numbered 2000–2969 {200–289} in English or Africana studies, or permission of the instructor.

3020 {370} c. Jane Austen and Company. Fall 2013. Ann Kibbie.

Seminar. Examines Austen’s major works, from Northanger Abbey to Persuasion, by pairing each novel either with a work by one of her major literary influences (such as Frances Burney’s Evelina and Ann Radcliffe’s The Romance of the Forest), or with a later work (such as Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre) that responds to and challenges Austen’s own novelistic practice. Will also examine major currents in Austen criticism. (Same as Gender and Women’s Studies 3019 {370}.)

Prerequisite: One course numbered 2000–2969 {200–289} in English or permission of the instructor.

3021 c. Totalitarianism and Dissidence in Contemporary Chinese Literature. Spring 2014. Belinda Kong.

Seminar. Can “literature” be produced within a totalitarian regime where public expression is tightly controlled by the state? Or does political repression ironically foster creative means of literary circumvention? These are some central questions raised by the controversial awarding of the 2012 Nobel Prize in Literature to Mo Yan. Focusing on contemporary China as a case study, explores the relation between aesthetics and politics via a range of writers, from establishment novelists to dissidents in exile to Internet activists. Authors may include Mo Yan, Su Tong, Yu Hua, Liu Xiaobo, Liao Yiwu, Yan Lianke, Ai Weiwei, and Han Han. Theoretical reference points may include Lukacs, Arendt, Mao, Boym, Barme, and Evasdottir. (Same as Asian Studies 3051.)

Prerequisite: One course numbered 2000–2969 {200–289} in English or Asian studies, or permission of the instructor.

3022 c. The Arts of Science in the English Renaissance. Spring 2014. Aaron Kitch.

Seminar. Examines the convergence of new modes of scientific knowledge and new genres of fiction in the period between 1500 and 1650, when writers such as Philip Sidney, William Shakespeare, and Margaret Cavendish redefined imaginative literature as a tool of scientific inquiry. Topics include utopian technologies, alchemy and sexuality, natural philosophy, and the science of humanism. Authors (in addition to those mentioned above) include Thomas More, Christopher Marlowe, John Donne, and Ben Jonson. Secondary readings feature Francis Bacon, Bruno Latour, Steven Shapin, Bruce Moran, and Elizabeth Spiller, among others. Note: This course fulfills the pre-1800 literature requirement for English majors.

Prerequisite: One course numbered 2000–2969 {200–289} in English or permission of the instructor.

4000–4003 {401–404} c. Advanced Independent Study in English. The Department.

4029 {405} c. Advanced Collaborative Study in English. The Department.

4050–4051 c. Honors Project in English. The Department.

Online Catalogue content is current as of August 1, 2013. For most current course information, use the online course finder. Also see Addenda.