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The College Catalogue

Education – Courses

First-Year Seminars

For a full description of first-year seminars, see pages 157–168.

1015 {15} c. Urban Education. Fall 2013. Doris Santoro.

[1020 {20} c. The Educational Crusade.]

Introductory, Intermediate, and Advanced Courses

1101 {101} c - ESD. Contemporary American Education. Fall 2013. Doris Santoro. Spring 2014. The Department.

Examines current educational issues in the United States and the role schools play in society. Topics include the purpose of schooling; school funding and governance; issues of race, class, and gender; school choice; and the reform movements of the 1990s. The role of schools and colleges in society’s pursuit of equality and excellence forms the backdrop of this study.

2203 {203} c - ESD. Educating All Students. Fall 2013. Kathryn Byrnes. Spring 2014. Casey Meehan.

An examination of the economic, social, political, and pedagogical implications of universal education in American classrooms. Focuses on the right of every child, including physically handicapped, learning disabled, and gifted children, to equal educational opportunity. Requires a minimum of twenty-four hours of observation in a local secondary school.

Prerequisite: Education 1020 {20} or 1101 {101}.

2206 {206} b - ESD. Sociology of Education. Fall 2013. Ingrid Nelson.

Examines the ways that formal schooling influences individuals and the ways that social structures and processes affect educational institutions. Explores the manifest and latent functions of education in modern society; the role education plays in stratification and social reproduction; the relationship between education and cultural capital; the dynamics of race, class, and gender in education; and other topics. (Same as Sociology 2206 {206}.)

Prerequisite: Sociology 1101 {101} or Anthropology 1101 {101}, and a course in sociology numbered 2000-2969 {200-289}.

2211 {211} c. Education and the Human Condition. Spring 2014. Doris Santoro.

Explores the relationship between education and being/becoming human. Topics may be guided by the questions: What does it mean to be an educated person? How can education lead to emancipation? How might teaching and learning lead to the good life? What is our responsibility to teach the next generation? Readings may include works by Hannah Arendt, John Dewey, W. E. B. Du Bois, Plato, and Jacques Rancière, among others.

2212 {212} c - ESD. Gender, Sexuality, and Schooling. Fall 2014. Doris Santoro.

Schools are sites where young people learn to “do” gender and sexuality through direct instruction, the hidden curriculum, and peer-to-peer learning. In schools, gender and sexuality are challenged, constrained, constructed, normalized, and performed. Explores instructional and curricular reforms that have attempted to address students’ and teachers’ sexual identities and behavior. Examines the effects of gender and sexual identity on students’ experience of school, their academic achievement, and the work of teaching. Topics may include Compulsory Heterosexuality in the Curriculum; the Gender of the Good Student and Good Teacher; Sex Ed in an Age of Abstinence. (Same as Gay and Lesbian Studies 2120 {212} and Gender and Women’s Studies 2282 {282}.)

Prerequisite: One of the following: Education 1101 {101}, Gay and Lesbian Studies 2001 {201}, or Gender and Women’s Studies 1101 {101}.

2221 {221} c. Democracy’s Citadel: Education and Citizenship in America. Fall 2014. Charles Dorn.

Examines the relationship between education, citizenship, and democracy in America. Questions explored include: What does “public” mean and how necessary is a “public” to democracy? Is there something “democratic” about how Americans choose to govern their schools? What does “citizenship” mean? Is education a public good with a collective economic and civic benefit, a private good with benefits to individuals whose future earnings depend on the quality of their education, or some combination of the two? What type of curriculum is most important for civic education and how should it be taught? What policies are necessary to prevent economic inequality from undermining education’s role in fostering democratic citizenship? To what extent are the concepts of “education for democracy” and “democratic education” related?

Prerequisite: Education 1020 {20} or 1101 {101}.

2222 {222} b. Educational Psychology. Fall 2013. Kathryn Byrnes.

Examines theories of how people learn and the implications of those theories for the education of all students, particularly those who have been traditionally underserved in the United States. Course concepts will be grounded in empirical research and authentic activities geared toward understanding the nuances and complexities of perspectives on behavior, cognition, development, motivation, sociocultural identities, and pedagogy in PreK-12 educational contexts. Insights for the ways educators can structure learning experiences to better serve students’ needs from a variety of backgrounds will be cultivated through a field placement working with students. (Same as Psychology 2012 {222}.)

Prerequisite: Education 1101 {101}, Psychology 1101 {101}, or placement above Psychology 1101 {101}.

[2250 {250} c. Education and Law. (Same as Government 2940 {219}.)]

2251 {251} c. Teaching Writing: Theory and Practice. Fall 2013. Kathleen O’Connor.

Explores theories and methods of teaching writing, emphasizing collaborative learning and peer tutoring. Examines relationships between the writing process and the written product, writing and learning, and language and communities. Investigates disciplinary writing conventions, influences of gender and culture on language and learning, and concerns of ESL and learning-disabled writers. Students practice and reflect on revising, responding to others’ writing, and conducting conferences. Prepares students to serve as writing assistants for the Writing Project.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Selection during the previous spring semester by application to the Writing Project (see page 314).

2265 {265} c. Place-Based Education. Fall 2013. Casey Meehan.

One critique of K-12 schooling is that it separates the learning happening within the school walls from the places people inhabit. Explores the prospects and challenges of connecting the natural environment and community surroundings with formal K-12 educational settings, and investigates the historical and theoretical underpinnings of environmental education, place-based education, outdoor education, and sustainability education. Special attention given to the pedagogical dilemmas and opportunities these forms of education pose for teachers preparing students to live in a democratic society. (Same as Environmental Studies 2465 {265}.)

Prerequisite: Education 1101 {101}.

2970–2973 {291–294} c. Intermediate Independent Study in Education. The Department.

2999 {299} c. Intermediate Collaborative Study in Education. The Department.

3301 {301} c. Teaching and Learning. Fall 2013. Nancy Jennings and Casey Meehan.

A study of what takes place in classrooms: the methods and purposes of teachers, the response of students, and the organizational context. Readings and discussions help inform students’ direct observations and written accounts of local classrooms. Peer teaching is an integral part of the course experience. Requires a minimum of thirty-six hours of observation in a local secondary school. Education 3302 {303} must be taken concurrently with this course. In order to qualify for this course students must have previously taken Education 1101 {101} and 2203 {203}; have junior or senior standing; and have a concentration in a core secondary school subject area (English: four courses in English; world languages: four courses in the language; life science: four courses in biology; mathematics: four courses in mathematics; physical science: three courses in chemistry, earth and oceanographic science, or physics and one course in one of the other departments listed; or social studies: three courses in history and one course in anthropology, economics, government, psychology, or sociology).

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

3302 {303} c. Curriculum. Fall 2013. Nancy Jennings and Casey Meehan.

A study of the knowledge taught in schools; its selection and the rationale by which one course of study rather than another is included; its adaptation for different disciplines and for different categories of students; its cognitive and social purposes; the organization and integration of its various components. Education 3301 {301} must be taken concurrently with this course. In order to qualify for this course, students must have previously taken Education 1101 {101} and 2203 {203}; have junior or senior standing; and have a concentration in a core secondary school subject area (English: four courses in English; world languages: four courses in the language; life science: four courses in biology; mathematics: four courses in mathematics; physical science: three courses in chemistry, earth and oceanographic science, or physics and one course in one of the other departments listed; or social studies: three courses in history and one course in anthropology, economics, government, psychology, or sociology).

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

3303 {302} c. Student Teaching Practicum. Spring 2014. The Department.

Required of all students who seek secondary public school certification, this final course in the student teaching sequence requires that students work full time in a local secondary school from early January to late April. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. Education 3304 {304} must be taken concurrently. Students must complete an application and interview. Students with the following are eligible for this course: Education 2203 {203}, 3301 {301}, and 3302 {303}; junior or senior standing; a cumulative 3.0 grade point average; a 3.0 grade point average in Education 3301 {301} and 3302 {303}; and eight courses in a subject area that enables them to be certified by the State of Maine (English: eight courses in English; world languages: eight courses in the language; life science: six courses in biology and two additional courses in biology, biochemistry, or neuroscience; mathematics: eight courses in mathematics; physical science: six courses in chemistry, earth and oceanographic science, or physics, and one course in each of the other departments listed; or social studies: six courses in history (at least two must be non-United States history) and one course each in two of the following departments: anthropology, economics, government, psychology, or sociology).

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

3304 {304} c. Bowdoin Teacher Scholars Seminar. Spring 2014. The Department.

Taken concurrently with Education 3303 {302}, Student Teaching Practicum. Considers theoretical and practical issues related to effective classroom instruction. Students with the following are eligible for this course: Education 2203 {203}, 3301 {301}, and 3302 {303}; junior or senior standing; a cumulative 3.0 grade point average; a 3.0 grade point average in Education 3301 {301} and 3302 {303}; and eight courses in a subject area that enables them to be certified by the State of Maine (English: eight courses in English; world language: eight courses in the language; life science: six courses in biology and two additional courses in biology, biochemistry, or neuroscience; mathematics: eight courses in mathematics; physical science: six courses in chemistry, earth and oceanographic science, or physics, and one course in each of the other departments listed; or social studies: six courses in history (at least two must be non-United States history) and one course each in two of the following departments: anthropology, economics, government, psychology, or sociology).

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

3325 {325} b. Mindfulness in Education. Spring 2014. Kathryn Byrnes.

An exploration of the educational techniques/methods that human beings have found, across cultures and time, to concentrate, broaden, and deepen awareness of thoughts, emotions, and bodily sensations. Holistic and interdisciplinary lens on the theory and processes of how people learn. Focus on educational models that encourage and foster mindful learning such as Montessori and Waldorf. Seminar-style dialogue on course readings complemented by contemplative practices such as yoga, meditation, tai chi.

Prerequisite: Education 1020 {20} or 1101 {101}, and Education 2203 {203}.

3333. Education Studies Capstone. Spring 2014. The Department.

Provides students with the opportunity to synthesize issues in educational studies addressed in previous coursework. Through an experiential project, students deepen their understanding of how schools both mirror and change the societies that create them. One-half credit. Grading is Credit/D/Fail.

Prerequisite: Education 1101 {101} and three of the following: 2211 {211}, 2212 {212}, 2221 {221}, 2250 {250} (same as Government 2940 {219}), or 3325 {325}; or permission of the instructor.

4000–4003 {401–404} c. Advanced Independent Study in Education. The Department.

4029 {405} c. Advanced Collaborative Study in Education. The Department.

Online Catalogue content is current as of August 1, 2013. For most current course information, use the online course finder. Also see Addenda.