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The College Catalogue

Earth and Oceanographic Science – Overview

Collin S. Roesler, Department Chair

Marjorie L. Parker, Department Coordinator

Professors: Rachel J. Beane†, Philip Camill (Environmental Studies)

Associate Professors: Peter D. Lea, Collin S. Roesler

Assistant Professors: Emily M. Peterman, Michèle G. LaVigne

Visiting Faculty: Christian Schrader

Laboratory Instructors: Cathryn Field, Joanne Urquhart

Requirements for the Major in Earth and Oceanographic Science (EOS)

The major consists of ten courses. Majors may begin their study with any one of the introductory earth and oceanographic science courses: EOS 1105 {101}, 1305 {104} (same as Environmental Studies 1104 {104}), 1505 {102} (same as Environmental Studies 1102 {102}), or EOS 1515 {105} (same as Environmental Studies 1515 {105}). Majors are required to take EOS 2005 {200} (same as Environmental Studies 2221 {200}), and any one of the following: Biology 1102 or 1109 {102 or 109}; Chemistry 1102 or 1109 {102 or 109}; Computer Science 1101 {101}; Mathematics 1200 {155}, 1300 {165}, 1800 {181}, or 2108 {204}; or Physics 1140 {104}. To establish breadth within the major, students must take one core course with a laboratory (course numbers ending in 5) from each of the following three areas:

1. Solid Earth: EOS 2125 {241}, 2115, 2145 {242}, 2165 {262}, or 2215 {265};

2. Earth Surface Processes: EOS 2335 {220} or 2345 {270} (same as Environmental Studies 2270 {270}), or 2315 {277} or 2355 {272};

3. Oceans: EOS 2525 {252}, 2535, 2575 {255}, 2585 {282} (same as Environmental Studies 2282 {282}), 2605 {250}, or 2635 {267} (same as Environmental Studies 2267 {267}).

In addition, majors are required to take at least one research experience course (EOS 3115 {315} or 3515 {351}), and one senior seminar (EOS 3020 {302} [same as Environmental Studies 3902 {302}], 3140 {343}, or 3520 {352}). The remaining two elective courses may be selected from earth and oceanographic science courses at the intermediate or advanced levels (numbered 2000–2969 {200–289} or 3000–3999 {300–399}). One of these electives may include Biology 2319 {219} (same as Environmental Studies 2229 {219}), 2325 {225} (same as Environmental Studies 2225 {225}), 2574 {274} (same as Environmental Studies 2274 {274}); Chemistry 3050 {305} (same as Environmental Studies 3905 {305}), 3070 {350} (same as Environmental Studies 3950 {350}); Computer Science 3225 {350}; Environmental Studies 2004 {204}; Physics 2250 {251}, 2510 {262}, 2810 {257} (same as EOS 2810 {257} and Environmental Studies 2253 {253}), 3810 {357} (same as EOS 3050 {357} and Environmental Studies 3957 {357}); or an approved off-campus study or summer field course.

Note that:

(a) only one course numbered 1100-1999 {100-199} in earth and oceanographic science may be counted toward the major requirements;

(b) students may opt to begin the major with EOS 2005 {200} (same as Environmental Studies 2221 {200}) having previously taken Biology 1102 or 1109 {102 or 109}, or Chemistry 1102 or 1109 {102 or 109}. Such students may substitute an intermediate earth and oceanographic science laboratory course (numbered 2000–2969 {200–289}) or research experience course (EOS 3115 {315} or 3515 {351}) for the introductory EOS courses numbered 1100-1999 {101-105};

(c) independent studies do not count toward the major requirements; and

(d) all courses counted toward the major must be completed with a C- or better.

Students planning postgraduate study in earth and oceanographic science should note that they might present a stronger application if they take additional courses in the department and in the contributing sciences: biology, chemistry, computer science, mathematics, and physics. It is strongly advised that students consult with faculty on the design of their major and discuss the options of research projects through independent studies, fellowship-funded summer research, and honors projects.

Interdisciplinary Majors

The department does not explicitly participate in formal interdisciplinary programs. However, the departments of Earth and Oceanographic Science and Physics have identified major and minor pathways for students interested in majoring in earth and oceanographic science with an interest in physics (EOS major/physics minor) and students interested in majoring in physics with an earth and oceanographic science application (physics major/EOS minor). Students interested in an EOS major/physics minor with an interest in the solid earth discipline would be best served by selecting their optional physics courses from Physics 2130 {223}, 2150 {229}, 2230 {240}, 2250 {251}, 2510 {262}, 3000 {300}, 3010 {301}, 3020 {302}; those with an interest in the surface earth discipline should choose from Physics 2130 {223}, 2220 {235}, 2230 {240}, 2810 {257}, 3010 {301}, 3020 {302}, 3810 {357}; those with an interest in the oceanography discipline should choose from Physics 2130 {223}, 2150 {229}, 2230 {240}, 2240 {250}, 2810 {257}, 3000 {300}, 3010 {301}, 3020 {302}, 3120 {370}, 3130 {320}, 3810 {357}.

Requirements for the Minor in Earth and Oceanographic Science (EOS)

The minor consists of four courses in the department. Minors are required to take EOS 2005 {200} (same as Environmental Studies 2221 {200}). No more than one introductory course numbered 1100–1999 {101–105} in earth and oceanographic science may be included. All courses counted toward the minor must be completed with a C- or better.


Online Catalogue content is current as of August 1, 2014. For most current course information, use the online course finder. Also see Addenda.