Fall 2013 Courses

  • Please note that for the 2013-14 academic year, official course numbers are now four digits. This page only shows the older three-digit course numbers. If you need to see both the old and the new numbers, consult the College Catalogue.
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  • Login to Blackboard. Instructional materials are available on a course-by-course basis.
1026. Adventures in Neuroscience: Aphasias, Auras, and Axons
Hadley Horch M 9:30 - 10:25, W 9:30 - 10:25, F 9:30 - 10:25
Introduces the basics of neurobiology and the challenges inherent to studying the brain. Topics will include basic neuronal function, animal behavior, mutations and mental illness, drugs and addiction, neuroethics, and consciousness. Readings from journal articles, websites, and popular press science books will be used. Students will develop critical thinking skills through regular class discussions, debates, and in-class scientific experimentation and data collection. Regular writing assignments will utilize a variety of science writing styles.
1090. Understanding Climate Change
David Carlon T 8:30 - 9:55, TH 8:30 - 9:55
Why is the global climate changing and how will biological systems respond? This course includes sections on climate systems and climate change, reconstructing ancient climates and past biological responses, predicting future climates and biological responses, climate policy, the energy crisis, and potential solutions. Includes a few field trips and laboratories designed to illustrate approaches to climate change science at the cellular, physiological, and ecological levels.
1101. Biological Principles I
Anne McBride M 9:30 - 10:25, W 9:30 - 10:25, F 9:30 - 10:25
The first in a two-semester introductory biology sequence. Topics include fundamental principles of cellular and molecular biology with an emphasis on providing a problem-solving approach to an understanding of genes, RNA, proteins, and cell structure and communication. Focuses on developing quantitative skills, as well as critical thinking and problem solving skills. Lecture and weekly laboratory/discussion groups. To ensure proper placement, students must take the biology placement examination and must be recommended for placement in Biology 1101 {101}. Students continuing in biology will take Biology 1102 {102}, not Biology 1109 {109}, as their next biology course.
1109A. Scientific Reasoning in Biology
Jack Bateman M 9:30 - 10:25, W 9:30 - 10:25, F 9:30 - 10:25
Lectures examine fundamental biological principles, from the sub-cellular to the ecosystem level with an emphasis on critical thinking and the scientific method. Laboratory sessions will help develop a deeper understanding of the techniques and methods used in the biological science by requiring students to design and conduct their own experiments. Lecture and weekly laboratory/discussion groups. To ensure proper placement, students must take the biology placement examination and must be recommended for placement in Biology 1109 {109}.
1109B. Scientific Reasoning in Biology
Michael Palopoli M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25
Lectures examine fundamental biological principles, from the sub-cellular to the ecosystem level with an emphasis on critical thinking and the scientific method. Laboratory sessions will help develop a deeper understanding of the techniques and methods used in the biological science by requiring students to design and conduct their own experiments. Lecture and weekly laboratory/discussion groups. To ensure proper placement, students must take the biology placement examination and must be recommended for placement in Biology 1109 {109}.
2210. Plant Physiology
Samuel Taylor M 9:30 - 10:25, W 9:30 - 10:25, F 9:30 - 10:25
An introduction to the physiological processes that enable plants to grow under the varied conditions found in nature. General topics discussed include the acquisition, transport, and use of water and mineral nutrients, photosynthetic carbon assimilation, and the influence of environmental and hormonal signals on development and morphology. Adaptation and acclimation to extreme environments and other ecophysiological subjects are also discussed. Weekly laboratories reinforce principles discussed in lecture and expose students to modern research techniques.
2135. Neurobiology
Hadley Horch M 11:30 - 12:25, W 11:30 - 12:25, F 11:30 - 12:25
Examines fundamental concepts in neurobiology from the molecular to the systems level. Topics include neuronal communication, gene regulation, morphology, neuronal development, axon guidance, mechanisms of neuronal plasticity, sensory systems, and the molecular basis of behavior and disease. Weekly lab sessions introduce a wide range of methods used to examine neurons and neuronal systems.
2175. Developmental Biology
William Jackman T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55
An examination of current concepts of embryonic development, with an emphasis on experimental design. Topics include cell fate specification, morphogenetic movements, cell signaling, differential gene expression and regulation, organogenesis, and the evolutionary context of model systems. Project-oriented laboratory work emphasizes experimental methods. Lectures and three hours of laboratory per week.
2319. Biology of Marine Organisms
Amy Johnson T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
The study of the biology and ecology of marine mammals, seabirds, fish, intertidal and subtidal invertebrates, algae, and plankton. Also considers the biogeographic consequences of global and local ocean currents on the evolution and ecology of marine organisms. Laboratories, field trips, and research projects emphasize natural history, functional morphology, and ecology. Lectures and four hours of laboratory or field trip per week. One weekend field trip included.
2124. Biochemistry and Cell Biology
Bruce Kohorn T 8:30 - 9:55, TH 8:30 - 9:55
Focuses on the structure and function of cells as we have come to know them through the interpretation of direct observations and experimental results. Emphasis is on the scientific (thought) processes that have allowed us to understand what we know today, emphasizing the use of genetic, biochemical, and optical analysis to understand fundamental biological processes. Covers details of the organization and expression of genetic information, and the biosynthesis, sorting, and function of cellular components within the cell. Concludes with examples of how cells perceive signals from other cells within cell populations, tissues, organisms, and the environment. Three hours of lab each week. Chemistry 2250 {225} is recommended. Not open to students who have credit for Biology 2023 {223}.
2325. Biodiversity and Conservation Science
John Lichter M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25
People rely on nature for food, materials, medicines, and recreation; yet the fate of Earth’s biodiversity is rarely given priority among the many pressing problems facing humanity today. Explores the interactions within and among populations of plants, animals, and microorganisms, and the mechanisms by which those interactions are regulated by the physical and chemical environment. Major themes are biodiversity and the processes that maintain biodiversity, the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem function, and the science underlying conservation efforts. Laboratory sessions consist of student research, local field trips, laboratory exercises, and discussions of current and classic ecological literature.
2553. Neurophysiology
Patsy Dickinson M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55
A comparative study of the function of the nervous system in invertebrate and vertebrate animals. Topics include the mechanism that underlie both action potentials and patterns of spontaneous activity in individual nerve cells, interactions between neurons, and the organization of neurons into larger functional units. Lectures and four hours of laboratory work per week.
2574. Marine Conservation Biology
Damon Gannon W 8:00 - 9:25, F 8:00 - 9:25
Introduces key biological concepts that are essential for understanding conservation issues. Explores biodiversity in the world’s major marine ecosystems; the mechanisms of biodiversity loss at the genetic, species, and ecosystem levels; and the properties of marine systems that pose unique conservation challenges. Investigates the theory and practice of marine biodiversity conservation, focusing on the interactions among ecology, economics, and public policy. Consists of lecture/discussion, lab, field trips, guest seminars by professionals working in the field, and student-selected case studies.
3304. The RNA World
Anne McBride M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25
Seminar exploring the numerous roles of ribonucleic acid, from the discovery of RNA as a cellular messenger to the development of RNAs to treat disease. Topics also include RNA enzymes, interactions of RNA viruses with host cells, RNA tools in biotechnology, and RNA as a potential origin of life. Focuses on discussions of papers from the primary literature.
3314. Advanced Genetics and Epigenetics
Jack Bateman TH 1:00 - 3:55
A seminar exploring the complex relationship between genotype and phenotype, with an emphasis on emerging studies of lesser-known mechanisms of inheritance and gene regulation. Topics include dosage compensation, parental imprinting, paramutation, random monoallelic expression, gene regulation by small RNAs, DNA elimination, copy number polymorphism, and prions. Reading and discussion of articles from the primary literature.
3325. Topics in Neuroscience
Patsy Dickinson M 8:30 - 9:25, W 8:30 - 9:25, F 8:30 - 9:25
An advanced seminar focusing on one or more aspects of neuroscience, such as neuronal regeneration and development, modulation of neuronal activity, or the neural basis of behavior. Students read and discuss original papers from the literature.
3381. Ecological Genetics
Vladimir Douhovnikoff M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55
Covers the principles of population and quantitative genetics from an ecological perspective. Focuses on key concepts in the evolution of natural and managed populations, including subjects such as the heritability of ecologically important traits, inbreeding effects, and random genetic drift. Discusses various field and lab methods using genetic information in the study of ecology.