Calendar of Events

Chemistry Department Seminar Geoffrey Davies Northeastern University "Measuring the Retained Water and Sequestered Organic Carbon Contents of Soil Pofiles in Aroostook and Piscataquis Counties Maine, USA"

Chemistry Department Seminar Geoffrey Davies Northeastern University  "Measuring the Retained Water and Sequestered Organic Carbon Contents of Soil Pofiles in Aroostook and Piscataquis Counties Maine, USA"

February 7, 2014 3:00 PM  – 4:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

Humic acids (HA) and fulvic acids (FA) are sequestered carbon compounds in soils that can be measured reliably with gravimetric and spectrophotometric methods, respectively. As part of the ongoing National Soil Project at Northeastern University, this paper reports the HA and FA contents of soil horizons from agricultural (potatoes in rotation with small grains and broccoli) and forestry land uses in northern Maine, USA. The agricultural fields are depleted in HA and FA compared to nearby woodland soils of similar provenance. We confirm that HA are better soil water retainers than total organic matter (OM) components on an equal mass basis. Humification starts at the soil surface and HA, FA, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) contents drop sharply below the O and A horizons. The depleted OM, HA, FA, and DOC contents of spodosol horizons in soil profiles can be quantified. Fulvic acids in the Maine soils investigated are in a solid-solution equilibrium with a HA·FA(s)/FA(aq) ratio of about 3.4:1. From the regression of DOC (g L-1) and FA(g L-1), FA in the Maine soil samples contain about 54% carbon. The HA and FA are long-lived soil components that represent the baseline OM content of any soil. As such they are a sink in the carbon cycle that needs to be maintained in agricultural soils, including those in Aroostook and Piscataquis Counties of Maine.

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Chemistry Department Seminar Alfred Voskian Syska Voskian Consulting. "Polymers: The Chemistry behind Plastics"

Chemistry Department Seminar Alfred Voskian Syska Voskian Consulting. "Polymers: The Chemistry behind Plastics"

February 14, 2014 3:00 PM  – 4:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

Plastics are ubiquitous in today’s life. They have enabled great advancements in safety, sanitation and efficiency, but also can be the source of dangerous pollution and toxicity. We will look at some of the major polymer families we encounter every day, differentiating characteristics of each, and especially the chemical reaction streams used to create finished plastics from basic hydrocarbons.

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Bowdoin Marine Science Semester Information Session

Bowdoin Marine Science Semester Information Session

February 19, 2014 7:00 PM  – 8:00 PM
Kanbar Hall, Room 107

BOWDOIN MARINE SCIENCE SEMESTER, FALL 2014
Information Session-Wednesday, Feb 19 7:00 pm
Kanbar Hall, Room 107

* Immersion semester for juniors and seniors
* Taught at the Coastal Studies Center on Orr's Island, Harpswell Sound
* Four courses in module format, field and lab experience, independent research, Marine biodiversity, biological oceanography, benthic ecology, molecular ecology & evolution
*Tropical field trip to Baja California

Interested? Come to informational meeting this Wednesday Feb.19, 7pm, Kanbar Hall, Room 107

Or contact Dave Carlon, Director of the Bowdoin Marine Lab, dcarlon@bowdoin.edu

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Rising Above the Crowd: Identification of New Genes Controlling Growth and Development in Arabidopsis thaliana

Rising Above the Crowd: Identification of New Genes Controlling Growth and Development in Arabidopsis thaliana

February 27, 2014 4:00 PM  – 5:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

Charlie Anderson, Penn State, Eberly College of Science

Research Interests:

Research lab studies plant cell wall dynamics, with the goal of informing efforts to produce sustainable food, materials, and bioenergy from plants.

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Chemistry Department Seminar Clay Bennett Tufts University. "Reagnet Controlled Approached to Stereoselective Glycosylation Reactions."

Chemistry Department Seminar Clay Bennett Tufts University. "Reagnet Controlled Approached to Stereoselective Glycosylation Reactions."

February 28, 2014 3:00 PM  – 4:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

Chemical glycosylation reactions typically rely on the intrinsic stereochemical information in the coupling partners to control selectivity (substrate control). A consequence of this is that extensive modification of the coupling partners, or optimization of reaction conditions, is often necessary to obtain stereoselective reactions, especially with so-called difficult linkages. To address this we have developed glycosylation reactions where the promoter exerts absolute control over the stereochemical outcome of the reaction (reagent control). Using this approach in the 2-deoxy series we have found that it is possible to obtain either anomer of a particular glycosidic linkage from the same coupling partners simply by changing the promoter. The scope of this approach with different classes of donors, and mechanistic considerations will also be discussed.

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Stories of speciation: Sperm invasion, defective males, and hyperdiversity

Stories of speciation: Sperm invasion, defective males, and hyperdiversity

March 27, 2014 4:00 PM  – 5:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

Asher Cutter, Associate Professor, Canada Research Chair, University of Toronto, CA

Ecology & Evolutionary Biology

In the Cutter lab, we study the genetic basis of evolutionary change. We are particularly interested heritable changes through time with causes that are at the interface of natural selection and non-adaptive evolutionary forces.

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Chemistry Department Seminar Eben Cross Massachusettes Institute of Technology " From Cookstoves to Combustion Engines: How real-time aerosol mass spectrometry is improving our understanding of the climate and air quality impacts of combustion emissions."

Chemistry Department Seminar Eben Cross Massachusettes Institute of Technology " From Cookstoves to Combustion Engines: How real-time aerosol mass spectrometry is improving our understanding of the climate and air quality impacts of combustion emissions."

March 28, 2014 3:00 PM  – 4:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

We are all familiar with the sights, sounds, and smells of incomplete combustion whether from a diesel bus at the corner of a busy intersection, a backyard barbeque, or a neglected piece of toast in the toaster-oven.  Each of these ‘plume events’ is comprised of a complex mix of particulate and gas phase species whose chemical composition, phase, and concentration vary dramatically across tight spatial domains (~ meters) and fast temporal scales (~ seconds). Over the past decade, the development of real-time, quantitative, field-deployable instrumentation has provided a more detailed characterization of the physical and chemical properties of near-field combustion emissions. In this seminar I will present results obtained with two recently developed mass spectrometry tools; the Soot-Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS) for measurement of refractory (black carbon, metals) and non-refractory (organic and inorganic) particulate matter and the Total Gas phase Organics (TGO) instrument for measurement of intermediate and semi-volatile organic gas phase species. Results from three combustion systems will be discussed: a Haitian cookstove, a gas-turbine jet engine, and a medium duty diesel engine. Collectively, the air quality and climate impacts of these combustion systems span local, regional, and global scales, further motivating the continued development of analytical techniques such as those introduced in this talk.

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Chemistry Department Seminar Thomas Baker University of Ottawa "Wood Eye! Selective Aerobic Oxidation of C-C Bonds in Lignin Models using Base Metal Complexes: A Comparison of Oxovanadium and Copper Catalysts"CANCELLED! Rescheduled for Sepetember!

Chemistry Department Seminar Thomas Baker University of Ottawa "Wood Eye! Selective Aerobic Oxidation of C-C Bonds in Lignin Models using Base Metal Complexes: A Comparison of Oxovanadium and Copper Catalysts"CANCELLED!  Rescheduled for  Sepetember!

April 4, 2014 3:00 PM  – 4:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

Selective aerobic oxidation of lignin is being explored with a view to obtaining valuable aromatic chemicals.1 While many C-O bonds can be cleaved by heat or acid treatments to afford aromatic products such as vanillin, selective oxidative cleavage of C-C bonds may afford complementary aldehyde and acid products that could be converted subsequently into value-added aromatic chemicals. In previous work we showed that pyridine enables a novel 2 e- alcohol oxidation mechanism using oxovanadium complex catalysts and air.2 This led to different selectivity in C-C bond cleavage reactions of diols and a-hydroxyether lignin models vs. less basic solvents such as acetonitrile or DMSO.3 In contrast, use of simple copper halide salts in pyridine4 bypasses the C-H oxidation pathway in favour of direct C-C bond cleavage.5 Reactivity of the copper and vanadium catalysts in the oxidation of more complex b-O-4 lignin model compounds will be compared and the differences in selectivity discussed.

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Restoring Imperiled Ecosystems using Fire

Restoring Imperiled Ecosystems using Fire

April 10, 2014 4:00 PM  – 5:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

Leda N. Kobziar University of Florida Associate Professor of Fire Science & Forest Conservation

Her research interests include: the efficacy of fuels reduction and prescribed burning treatments in forest restoration; predicting potential fire behavior and severity; using dendrochronology to determine historical fire regimes; and the relationships between fire, fuels management, and soil carbon efflux.

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Chemistry Department Seminar Eric Hansen Pfizer

Chemistry Department Seminar Eric Hansen Pfizer

April 11, 2014 3:00 PM  – 4:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

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Neurochemical substrates for modulation of audition and acoustic behavior in a vocal fish

Neurochemical substrates for modulation of audition and acoustic behavior in a vocal fish

April 17, 2014 4:00 PM  – 5:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

Paul M. Forlano, Brooklyn College, Department of Biology

Using fish as model systems, Forlano's lab employs a combination of evolutionary/systems neuroscience with a molecular and cellular approach in order to identify the mechanisms underlying steroid-induced neural plasticity and sex differences in brain and behavior. These studies focus on vocal, auditory and neuroendocrine circuits that are conserved across vertebrates.

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Kemp Symposium "Visions of Reality: Science and Other Means of Seeking Knowledge"

Kemp Symposium "Visions of Reality: Science and Other Means of Seeking Knowledge"

April 18, 2014 9:00 AM  – 4:00 PM
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

Panels: "The Peripatetic," "The Encyclopedic," "The Reflexive," "The Pious," and "The Mathematical"

Modern science enjoys a prominent place and enormous authority in our age. Such prestige is the outcome of a long historical process, during which scientific knowledge and method have been gradually promoted over other forms of knowledge and methods of inquiry. This symposium brings together an interdisciplinary group of scholars to examine the diverse means of creating technical knowledge before and after the birth of modern science. The keynote address and the panels highlight the latest scholarship on a range of issues, from scientific transference between traditional China and the West to nuclear power during the Cold War period.

Open to the public free of charge. For more information and the complete schedule of events, go to: 2014 Kemp Symposium or call the Department of History at 207-725-3291.

Sponsored by the Robert J. Kemp Lectureship Fund, Departments of History, Asian Studies, Religion, Chemistry, and Earth and Oceanographic Science.

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Gene by environment interaction and the genomic basis of local adaptation in plants

Gene by environment interaction and the genomic basis of local adaptation in plants

April 24, 2014 4:00 PM  – 5:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

David Des Marais, Research Associate, Harvard University

Research Interests

I study the diversity of life at many different scales. Like most of us, I am amazed by the visual diversity of plant life. But I am also fascinated by the diversity of genes, proteins, and other molecules which give rise to the beautiful plants that surround us. My research addresses how molecular processes shape organismal diversity, and how these processes evolve within and between species of plants.


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A Decade+ of Early Stage Process Chemistry at the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson: Concepts and Applications

A Decade+ of Early Stage Process Chemistry at the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson: Concepts and Applications

April 25, 2014 3:00 PM  – 4:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

Johnson & Johnson's Janssen unit is one of the largest pharmaceutical companies in the world.  With products for a variety of diseases states (cancer, diabetes, arthritis, schizophrenia and many others), 2013 sales of $28.1 billion represented a nearly 11% increase from 2012.  To maintain strong growth, Janssen has a strong commitment to Research & Development, including a Drug Discovery site in La Jolla, California.  Over the last 14 years the La Jolla site has been at the vanguard in many Neuroscience and Immunology programs.  The importance of early stage process chemistry support for these projects will be discussed.  Specific examples from the H3 and FLAP projects will illustrate several critical general concepts.

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"What Does Neuroscience Teach us About Free Will?" with Daniel Dennett

"What Does Neuroscience Teach us About Free Will?" with Daniel Dennett

April 29, 2014 4:00 PM  – 5:30 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 016

A number of distinguished neuroscientists have recently been declaring that their science shows that free will is an illusion. It turns out that what they mean by this is something quite trivial, having almost nothing to do with whether or not we can be morally responsible choosers of our actions--but some of them think otherwise. Exposing the confusions in their thinking is a good job for philosophers.

Please join us for this free lecture
Tuesday, April 29th
4:00 pm
Druckenmiller Hall 016


Sponsored by the Department of Philosophy with support from the Departments of Psychology and Neuroscience.

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