Fall 2013 Calendar of Events

Chemistry Department Seminar Christoph Aeppli "Where did all the oil go? The chemistry of oil weathering after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill"

Chemistry Department Seminar Christoph Aeppli

December 6, 2013 3:00 PM  – 4:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill led to the release of approx. 5 million barrels of oil in the Gulf of Mexico, making it the larges marine oil spill in US history. Whereas approx. 40% of the released hydrocarbons were burnt, recovered or evaporated, 45% dissolved in a deep plume in the water phase, and the remaining 15% formed surface slicks that ended up on beaches or formed near-shore submersed oil mats. These mats are a long-term source of oil and still today, oil-soaked sand aggregates are washed on beaches along the Gulf of Mexico. Analyzing these samples provides a unique opportunity to gain new insights in the fate of oil on time scales of years. Oil is a complex mixture of thousands of hydrocarbons with various physico-chemical properties. Recent analytical development, such as comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography now allows analyzing relative changes in the composition of petroleum on a molecular level. This technique allowed us to identify Deepwater Horizon oil on the sea surface and on beaches, based on relative amounts of various petroleum biomarker compounds (“oil fingerprinting”). Furthermore, we analyzed compositional changes in the petroleum hydrocarbon over time. This showed that abiotic (photooxidation) and biotic (biodegradation) oil degradation processes efficiently remove many – but not all – hydrocarbons on time scales of years. However, these degradation processes also led to the formation of highly oxygenated oil degradation products. These compounds are recalcitrant on the observed time scale, form a pool of compounds that are currently overlooked, and might contain products with ecotoxic effects. Overall, taking advantage of the complexity of oil allowed us to gain new knowledge about oil weathering processes. This knowledge will be useful to prepare for future potential oil spills.

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From triclosan to dioxins: How handsoap leads to an environmental problem

From triclosan to dioxins: How handsoap leads to an environmental problem

November 8, 2013 3:00 PM  – 4:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

Seminar: "From triclosan to dioxins: How your handsoap leads to an unanticipated environmental problem" by William Arnold of the University of Minnesota

Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) are widely used and through their normal course of use, often find their way into the sewage system. Wastewater treatment plants are not designed to remove trace chemicals, but a large fraction of the PPCPs are removed. The small fraction that is released into the environment, however, may have adverse effects. 

One ubiquitous PPCP is triclosan, the antimicrobial ingredient in liquid handsoaps. For triclosan, the major route to the environment is via wastewater effluents discharged to surface waters. During the disinfection of wastewater, chlorinated triclosan derivatives are produced. The impact of triclosan and related compounds is, in part, determined by their persistence in aquatic environments. 

Photolysis (reaction initiated by sunlight) is an important loss process for triclosan, and triclosan and chlorinated triclosan derivatives produce specific dioxins (a class of known toxic chemicals) in 1-3% yield upon exposure to sunlight.

Sediment cores serve as a record of contaminant release and accumulation in aquatic systems, and thus were collected across Minnesota to determine historical levels of triclosan and its degradation products. Analysis of sediment cores shows that while dioxins produced from incineration have been decreasing for the past thirty years, concentrations of dioxins derived from triclosan have been increasing and are correlated with triclosan concentrations/use.

The findings of this work suggest that the use of triclosan in consumer products merits additional scrutiny.

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Dinner with Chemists- INVITATION ONLY

Dinner with Chemists- INVITATION ONLY

November 7, 2013 6:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Cram Alumni House, Barn (Torrey Barn)

Enjoy dinner with the Chemistry Faculty! Fajita Buffet dinner Salad Variety Make your own fajitas, Chicken, veggies, Beans and Rice and cornbread Assorted cookies, brownies and pastries. 6:00pm Cram Alumni Barn 83 Federal Street Sign in sheets available in class or in Room 157 at Penny's desk! Sign up NO LATER than Wednesday October 30th 4pm. The Chemistry Faculty look forward to seeing you there!

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Environmental drivers of spatial biodiversity patterns from genomes to communities

Environmental drivers of spatial biodiversity patterns from genomes to communities

November 7, 2013 4:00 PM  – 4:55 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

Biology Fall 2013 Honors Seminar

Jesse Lasky, Columbia University
 
Spatial variation in communities and populations is one of the oldest recognized, yet least understood patterns in biology (see von Humboldt & Bonpland 1805, at right). I am fascinated by the challenge to understand spatial variation in complex ecological systems, partly because predicting changes in biodiversity in response to environmental change can inform conservation planning. My interest in fundamental ecological and evolutionary processes has led me to study biology at the levels of communities and genomes. Though seemingly disparate, the two systems are mathematically similar in that they are highly multivariate, which challenges attempts to understand drivers of diversity. I study individual-scale processes with large data sets and advanced computational tools in order to make inferences about large-scale biodiversity patterns.

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Susan Wegner presents: Ovid's Metamorphoses, Astronomy and Painting in Galileo's Florence

Susan Wegner presents: Ovid's Metamorphoses, Astronomy and Painting in Galileo's Florence

November 5, 2013 12:00 PM  – 1:00 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

FACULTY SEMINAR SERIES

Susan Wegner, Associate Professor of Art History is the featured speaker. Her talk is titled: Ovid's Metamorphoses, Astronomy and Painting in Galileo's Florence.

Open to faculty and staff.
Buffet lunch $3, or bring your own lunch.

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Cellular Supply Chain Management: RNA-based Control of Ribosomal Protein Synthesis in Bacteria

Cellular Supply Chain Management: RNA-based Control of Ribosomal Protein Synthesis in Bacteria

October 31, 2013 4:00 PM  – 4:55 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

Michelle Meyer, Assistant Professor of Biology, Boston College will speak about her research on "Cellular Supply Chain Management: RNA-based Control of Ribosomal Protein Synthesis in Bacteria."

Meyer's fields of interest include computational biology, non-coding RNA discovery and validation, molecular evolution, RNA and protein structure.

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Studies on the invasive ascidian Didemnum vexillum and the Long Island Sound Benthic Mapping Initiative

Studies on the invasive ascidian Didemnum vexillum and the Long Island Sound Benthic Mapping Initiative

October 29, 2013 4:00 PM  – 5:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

Lauren Stefaniak, Department of Marine Sciences, University of Connecticut

Over the past 40 years, the colonial ascidian, Didemnum vexillum, has spread from its native Japan to many temperate coastal regions of the world. Reproduction of daughter colonies in D. vexillum can be sexual, via larvae, and asexual, via long colony lobes or tendrils that easily fragment from the parent colony. Because D. vexillum broods its larvae within the colony matrix, in addition to having the potential to reattach and grow, detached tendrils could also transport competent or near-competent larvae to new locations. Here we quantify aspects of the life history cycle of D. vexillum to determine the relative importance of sexual and asexual pathways to D. vexillum reproduction. We found that the tendril growth form is important to the population biology of D. vexillum by increasing space for feeding and reproducing zooids in a space-limited environment. However, because reattachment of tendrils requires an extended period of contact, tendrils may primarily aid dispersal and establishment of new populations by increasing the number of recruits settling in a single location, potentially resulting in an increased probability of population survival.

The Long Island Sound Seafloor Mapping Collaborative is a multi-institution initiative to create new integrated ecological habitat maps of Long Island Sound. As a part of the Ecological classification group, my project uses a combination of a grab sampler equipped with high-definition video and still cameras, a remotely operated vehicle, drop cameras, and closed circuit rebreather diving to intensely sample benthic habitats. Along with acoustic benthic imaging, modeling of the physical environment, and sediment characterization, these observations will be used to generate habitat maps that managers and stakeholders can use to plan infrastructure in Long Island Sound in a way that minimizes impacts on economically important fisheries and the ecological health of the Sound.

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Graduate School Fair

Graduate School Fair

October 29, 2013 1:30 PM  – 5:30 PM
David Saul Smith Union, Morrell Lounge

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Dave Gorin Seminar "Methylation of Oxygen Nucleophiles with Safe, Stable Methylating Agents."

Dave Gorin Seminar

October 25, 2013 2:45 PM  – 3:45 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

Dave Gorin of Smith College gives a seminar on "Methylation of Oxygen Nucleophiles with Safe, Stable Methylating Agents."

Although methylation reactions are commonplace, currently used reagents are hazardous, toxic, and/or unstable. Dimethylcarbonate has been put forth as an inexpensive, non-toxic, and "green" potential methylating reagent. We have discovered a general, base-catalyzed methyl transfer from dimethylcarbonate to carboxylic acids. High selectivity for esterification is observed even in the presence of unprotected phenols and the mild reaction conditions enable conservation of stereochemistry at epimerizable stereocenters. Isotope-labeling studies suggest a mechanism proceeding by direct methyl transfer from dimethylcarbonate to the substrate.

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Rapid radiation, divergence, and sexual selection: population and phylogenomic case studies

Rapid radiation, divergence, and sexual selection: population and phylogenomic case studies

October 24, 2013 4:00 PM  – 4:55 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

Sarah Kingston, Smithsonian, National Museum of Natural History

Understanding speciation is crucial to the study of biodiversity. Unraveling the processes that govern the splitting and divergence of lineages is a tenet of evolutionary biology. Using three case studies Sarah will demonstrate the power of emerging technologies in population genomics and phylogenomics: a rapid radiation of species within a dolphin subfamily, divergence between towhee lineages in the face of hybrid-mediated gene flow, and introgression of a sexually selected plumage character across species lines in manakins.

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Carbon flux in symbiotic zoanthids under climate change and ocean acidification

Carbon flux in symbiotic zoanthids under climate change and ocean acidification

October 22, 2013 4:00 PM  – 5:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

Erin R. Graham, Department of Biology, Temple University

Many invertebrates in the phylum Cnidaria form endosymbiotic relationships with dinoflagellates (genus Symbiodinium), which supply their hosts with fixed carbon from photosynthesis. Symbiotic cnidarians form the foundation of diverse benthic ecosystems in tropical and subtropical waters, but rising sea surface temperatures and ocean acidification affect physiological processes in symbiotic associations, particularly calcification in reef-forming corals. Inhibition of calcification in corals suggests that future climate conditions may favor non-calcifying, soft-bodied cnidarians, yet there is little known about how climate change will affect carbon flux and primary production in non-calcifying symbiotic associations. Moreover, Symbiodinium species or types vary in their mechanisms of carbon acquisition, environmental tolerance, and photosynthetic output, therefore, symbiont type may alter carbon flux in the symbiotic animal (the holobiont).
In this seminar Erin will describe the effects of climate change and ocean acidification on carbon acquisition and fixation in two zoanthid species, and discuss mechanisms that may allow symbiotic cnidarieans to persist in warmer, acidified waters.

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President's Science Symposium: Student Talks

President's Science Symposium: Student Talks

October 18, 2013 1:35 PM  – 2:45 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Research conducted by faculty-mentored Bowdoin science and math students this past summer will be in the spotlight Friday, October 18, 2013, at the annual President's Science Symposium. All events are open to the Bowdoin community.

"The President's Science Symposium is a time to showcase the extraordinary scientific research performed by Bowdoin faculty and students," note's the event's coordinator Michael Danahy, lecturer in the Department of Chemistry. "It's a unique event in that all the sciences and mathematics are represented in one place, so one gets a real sense of the breadth of the impressive work done at the College."

Four students will give talks about their research from 1:35 p.m. to 2:45 p.m. in Kresge Auditorium, Visual Arts Center. The student researchers are Justin Dury-Agri '15 from the mathematics department, Beatriz Malibiran '14 from the biochemistry program, Nicholas Wetzel '14 of the computer science department, and Adam Zhang '14 of the neuroscience program.

Following these talks, poster presentations by more than 90 student researchers in the sciences and math will be held from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. in Morrell Lounge, David Saul Smith Union. Students will be on hand to discuss their projects.

"With the student poster presentations and student research talks, students take ownership of their research," says Danahy. "This event highlights the importance of research in science education." The symposium will kick off earlier in the day with a keynote address at Common Hour by guest speaker Daniel Schrag, an expert on climate change and a professor in the Department of Geology at Harvard University. Schrag's talk, titled "Climate, Energy and Innovation," will be given at 12:30 p.m. in Kresge Auditorium, Visual Arts Center.

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Daniel Schrag on Climate, Energy, and Innovation

Daniel Schrag on Climate, Energy, and Innovation

October 18, 2013 12:30 PM  – 1:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Common Hour with Dr. Daniel Schrag - Keynote for President's Science Symposium

Daniel P. Schrag will discuss "Climate, Energy and Innovation."

The increase in atmospheric CO2 due to burning coal, oil and natural gas represents an unprecedented experiment on the Planet Earth. Geologic records support the view that future climate change will have a profound impact both on human society and on natural ecosystems. A daunting challenge is the timescale of climate change. More than half of the carbon dioxide emitted to the atmosphere by burning fossil fuels will remain for hundreds of years, and roughly 20% will be there for tens of thousands of years. In this context, a variety of strategies will be discussed for meeting the world's energy needs, preserving economic prosperity and security, while protecting human and natural systems from climate impacts. In addition, we will explore what strategies might be required if the impacts of climate change are larger than we expect.

Daniel Schrag is the Director of the Harvard University Center for the Environment, the Sturgis Hooper Professor of Geology, and Professor of Environmental Science and Engineering at Harvard University. He currently serves on President Obama's Council of Advisors for Science and Technology. Among various honors, he was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2000. Schrag received a B.S. from Yale University and a Ph.D. in Geology from the University of California at Berkeley.

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John Dawson Seminar on Understanding Heme Enzyme Catalysis

John Dawson Seminar on Understanding Heme Enzyme Catalysis

October 16, 2013 4:00 PM  – 5:30 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 016

"Understanding Heme Enzyme Catalysis Starts with Their Active Site Coordination Structure: Identifying Heme Iron Axial Ligands Using Magnetic Circular Dichrosim Spectroscopy," by John Dawson of the University of South Carolina.
Magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopy provides diagnostic spectral data sensitive to the identity of the axial ligands and to the spin and oxidation states of heme iron centers in proteins. In this effort, we have found the proximal ligand His93Gly myoglobin cavity mutant to be a remarkably versatile scaffold for preparation of model heme complexes of defined ligation. In particular, the difference in accessibility of the two sides of the heme iron center offers the advantage of forming ambient-temperature mixed-ligand heme model complexes, which are very difficult to prepare with model systems in organic solvents. Moreover, in the H93G Mb system, the protective environment provided by the protein allows for the formation of relatively stable oxyferrous and ferryl [Fe(IV)=O] complexes with variable ligands trans to the normally reactive dioxygen and oxo substituents. Ferrous, ferric and ferryl His93Gly Mb derivatives with various exogenous ligands have been prepared as models for native heme iron active sites ligated by proximal Lys (amines), Asp or Glu (carboxylates), Tyr (phenols), seleno-Cys (selenols), Cys (thiols) and Met (thioethers). Building upon this foundation, we have focused our attention on the use of the H93G Mb cavity mutant system to aid our investigation of the coordination structure of novel heme binding and transport proteins and heme-containing oxidative enzymes. (Funding NIH GM 26730)

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Jennifer Kohler Seminar " Capturing glycoconjugate complexes with metabolically incorporated photo-sugars."

Jennifer Kohler Seminar

September 27, 2013 3:00 PM  – 4:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

Glycan-mediated interactions constitute the underlying molecular bases for a wide range of biological processes.  This class of interactions is particularly important in development, immunology, infection, and carcinogenesis.  Yet glycan-mediated interactions are difficult to detect and characterize, due to their low affinities and rapid dissociation kinetics.  To capture these ephemeral complexes, we make use of metabolic oligosaccharide engineering to incorporate photocrosslinking groups into cellular glycoconjugates.  In this presentation, I will describe our strategy for introducing photocrosslinkers into a variety of glycoconjugates, how we characterize which glycoconjugates are modified and the degree of modification, and the use of these photocrosslinkers to discover glycan-mediated interactions.  The utility of this approach will be demonstrated by describing the discovery of a novel receptor for cholera toxin.  

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Informational Meeting for the Biochemisty, Biology, and Neuroscience - Departmenal Honors

Informational Meeting for the Biochemisty, Biology, and Neuroscience - Departmenal Honors

September 19, 2013 4:00 PM  – 4:55 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

Informational Meeting:  A brief discussing on the guidelines for the Honors Program in Biology, Biochemistry, and Neuroscience

**Biochemistry students working with Biology Faculty.

Druckenmiller 20

4:15 pm

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Weekly Chemistry Seminar-Dr. Amelia Fuller, Santa Clara University

Weekly Chemistry Seminar-Dr. Amelia Fuller, Santa Clara University

May 3, 2013 3:00 PM  – 4:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

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Weekly Chemistry Seminar-Jerry Meyer, Johns Hopkins University

Weekly Chemistry Seminar-Jerry Meyer, Johns Hopkins University

April 26, 2013 3:00 PM  – 4:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

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Weekly Chemistry Seminar-Tim Jackson,University of Kansas

Weekly Chemistry Seminar-Tim Jackson,University of Kansas

April 19, 2013 3:00 PM  – 4:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

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Sanjeev Kulkarni on Machine Learning and Democracy: Some Problems in Collective Decision-Making

Sanjeev Kulkarni on Machine Learning and Democracy: Some Problems in Collective Decision-Making

April 4, 2013 4:30 PM  – 5:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

The Classics Department presents:

Sanjeev Kulkarni
Professor of Electrical Engineering 
Director of the Keller Center for Technology and Society
Princeton University
"Machine Learning and Democracy: Some Problems in Collective Decision-Making"
A recent area of interest in machine learning involves drawing inferences from a large number of agents, each with some partial information.  These problems in collective decision-making are closely related to a fundamental problem of democracy--that of inferring the collective will of the people.  This talk will give a brief overview of machine learning and voting theory, followed by a discussion of some of our recent work in these areas.
Underwritten by: the Charles F. Adams Lectureship Fund, the Jasper Jacob Stahl lectureship fund.  Co-sponsored by the Classics Department and Computer Science with additional support from the Government Department and Computational Studies.

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Seminar: Centering the genome: molecular control of mitotic chromosome movements

Seminar: Centering the genome: molecular control of mitotic chromosome movements

March 7, 2013 4:00 PM  – 5:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

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Weekly Chemistry Seminar, David Forbes, University of South Alabama

Weekly Chemistry Seminar, David Forbes, University of South Alabama

March 1, 2013 3:00 PM  – 4:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

Reaction of sulfur ylide with aldehyde, imine, and ketone functionality affords the desired three-membered heterocycle in excellent yield. The sulfur ylide is generated in situ upon decarboxylation of carboxymethylsulfonium betaine functionality. Of the carboxymethylsulfonium betaine derivatives surveyed, the highest level of conversion of p-acceptor to heterocycle was obtained with the one having S-methyl and S-phenyl functionality bound to a thioacetate derivative. Methylene aziridinations and epoxidations involving the decarboxylation of carboxymethylsulfonium betaine functionality complements existing technologies with the advantages of the reaction protocol, levels of conversion, and scope. Presented will be our approach and application of methylene transfers using sulfur ylide technologies

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Weekly Chemistry Seminar-George O'Doherty, Northeastern University

Weekly Chemistry Seminar-George O'Doherty, Northeastern University

February 22, 2013 3:00 PM  – 4:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

My research group has been working in two related areas of organic synthesis: carbohydrate synthesis and natural product synthesis. The unifying theme that connects our research in these two areas is our method of synthesis (asymmetric catalysis) and target selection (anti-cancer/anti-microbial agents). A recurring theme in the group's synthetic approaches to both types of targets is our reliance on asymmetric catalysis for the control of asymmetry. Fundamental to our approach is the development of highly efficient routes that transform, via catalysis, inexpensive achiral starting materials into enantiopure products, which are poised for the conversion into complex molecules with biologically relevant properties (i.e. enantioselective synthesis of a new “chiral pool” via asymmetric catalysis). Recently, we have found that these approaches have matured to the point where we have developed enantioselective routes to these complex molecules in sufficient quantities that are amenable for biomedical investigations.

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Seminar: Species interactions in a changing ocean: sponge symbioses as models for understanding

Seminar: Species interactions in a changing ocean: sponge symbioses as models for understanding

February 18, 2013 4:00 PM  – 5:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

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Weekly Chemistry Seminar-Lauren Buchanan, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Weekly Chemistry Seminar-Lauren Buchanan, University of Wisconsin-Madison

February 15, 2013 3:00 PM  – 4:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

Amyloid fiber formation is associated with more than twenty diseases, including type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's disease. Thus, there is great interest in developing amyloid inhibitors as potential therapeutics, but rational drug design is hindered by the dearth of detailed information about the structure and aggregation mechanism of amyloid fibers. Our group uses 2D IR spectroscopy with isotope labeling to study amyloid peptides and drug binding with residue-level structural specificity. I will introduce the method behind our spectroscopic technique and show how it has been applied to study hIAPP, the peptide implicated in type-II diabetes. Our results provide significant insight into the aggregation mechanism of hIAPP and experiments with a novel macrocyclic peptide inhibitor suggest a new approach to designing amyloid inhibitors.

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Seminar: The asthma epidemic: a challenge of applied immunology

Seminar: The asthma epidemic: a challenge of applied immunology

February 14, 2013 4:00 PM  – 5:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

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Seminar: The micro- and macro-evolution of speciation: tales from tropical seas

Seminar: The micro- and macro-evolution of speciation: tales from tropical seas

February 13, 2013 4:00 PM  – 5:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

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Durba Mitra presents: Testing Chastity, Evidencing Rape: Medical Evidence, Women's Rights, and Law in India

Durba Mitra presents: Testing Chastity, Evidencing Rape: Medical Evidence, Women's Rights, and Law in India

February 12, 2013 12:00 PM  – 1:00 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

FACULTY SEMINAR SERIES

Durba Mitra, CFD Postdoctoral Fellow in Gender and Women's Studies and History is the featured speaker. Her talk is titled Testing Chastity, Evidencing Rape: Medical Evidence, Women's Rights, and Law in India.

Open to faculty and staff.
Buffet lunch $3, or bring your own lunch.

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Weekly Chemistry Seminar-Matt Bogyo, Stanford University

Weekly Chemistry Seminar-Matt Bogyo, Stanford University

February 8, 2013 3:00 PM  – 4:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

Proteases are enzymes that primarily function by degrading protein substrates. Since this process is irreversible, proteases must be carefully regulated within cells and organisms in order to prevent undesired consequences. Furthermore, proteases often pathogenic roles in common human diseases such as cancer, asthma, arthritis and atherosclerosis. Over the past decade, my laboratory has developed a series of small molecule probes that specifically bind to the active form of protease targets through an enzyme catalyzed chemical reaction. These reagents freely penetrate cells and can be used to enrich complex proteomic samples for monitoring of global patterns of protease activity as well as to directly image protease activity in live cells and whole animals. They can also be used to monitor the efficacy and selectivity of small molecule protease inhibitor drugs. We are currently applying these probes to study the role of specific proteases in the process of angiogenesis and metastasis in mouse models of cancer as well as during the process of inflammation in mouse models of atherosclerosis and asthma. In addition we have developed probes that bind proteases associated with the process of programmed cell death (apoptosis). These reagents allow the direct non-invasive imaging of cell death in vivo. We are currently developing these tools to further study the cell biology of tumor response to chemotherapy. Recent advances in these projects will be presented

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Seminar: Going with the flow: linking physiology, behavior, and the physical environment

Seminar: Going with the flow: linking physiology, behavior, and the physical environment

February 6, 2013 4:00 PM  – 5:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

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Linnean Inaugural Lecture by Prof. Bruce Kohorn

Linnean Inaugural Lecture by Prof. Bruce Kohorn

November 27, 2012 7:30 PM  – 10:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Bruce Kohorn will deliver the Linnean Professorship of Biology and Biochemistry Inaugural Lecture. The lecture, titled "From Mountains to Membranes," will be an exploration of the mechanisms that create plant cell form and function, with a concentration on the cell surface and its interaction with the cell wall.

The Linnean Professorship was established in 1996 to support biology at Bowdoin College with a gift from the estate of Laurence F. Shurtleff of the Bowdoin Class of 1926. Shurtleff worked for the New England Telephone Company for 43 years, while maintaining an active role in civic philanthropy and a keen interest in botany. He was a long-serving president of the Board of Trustees of the Turner Free Library in Randolph, Massachusetts, and continued his avid hobby of raising cranberries until nearly the end of his life.

Professor Bruce Kohorn is a pioneer in the field of plant cell biology, having made significant and influential discoveries concerning membrane proteins and the communication between the plant cell wall and nucleus. He has won a number of awards, grants, and fellowships from the National Science Foundation, United States Department of Agriculture, National Institutes of Health, Pew Charitable Trusts, and Duke University for his teaching and study of membrane proteins and plant cell walls. He has published numerous scholarly articles on these subjects and serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Biological Chemistry and Frontiers in Plant Science.

Professor Kohorn joined the Bowdoin faculty in 2001 after 14 years on the botany and biology faculty of Duke University. He earned a bachelor of arts degree at the University of Vermont and a master of science and doctorate at Yale University, and was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California at Los Angeles.

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