Fall 2014 Courses

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ASNS 1006. China Encounters the West.
Explores the historical relationship between China and the West through examining a selection of their encounters from the seventeenth through the early twentieth centuries. Key episodes include: the Jesuit and Protestant missions, the arrival of the Industrial West (imperialism and war), the Cold War, and beyond. Examines such themes as religion and religiosity, science and technology, and the dynamics of cultural accommodation and communication. Interdisciplinary. Draws upon readings of history, the history of science, religion, and political science. Note: This course fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors.
ASNS 1013. Japan in the World.
Introduces students to the history, culture, and global interactions of Japan with a focus on the modern (post-1868) period through examination of primary and secondary sources, popular literature, and film. Along the way, the class will “De-exoticize” Japan, deconstruct the terms “Eastern” and “Western,” and consider how tensions between “Tradition/Modernity,” and “Inside/Outside,” have propelled modern Japanese historical development. Topics include: differing narratives of modernization; invention of “traditional” Japanese culture; the Western discovery of Japan/Japanese discovery of the West; changes in everyday life; tensions of modernity and tradition; war and defeat; and Japanese pop culture.
ASNS 1043. East Asian Genre Cinema: Action, Anime, and Martial Arts.
Explores East Asian cinema from a genre perspective with a focus on Hong Kong action, Japanese anime, and transnational martial arts films. In the framework of social-cultural history and context of genre theory, the course examines the paradigms that characterize the form and content of such films; investigates the relations between local-global and national-transnational; studies genre-specific issues such as spectators’ perception or industry practices to discern the role of gender, nation, power, and historiography. After taking the course, students will be able to explain the theoretical concepts of genre cinema, analyze the genre’s visual formation, and comprehend the social-cultural implications of the genre.
ASNS 1046. Global Media and Politics.
Examines the impact of media including the Internet, newspapers, and television, on politics and society in cross-national perspective. Asks how differences in the ownership and regulation of media affect how news is selected and presented, and looks at various forms of government censorship and commercial self-censorship. Also considers the role of the media and “pop culture” in creating national identities, perpetuating ethnic stereotypes, and providing regime legitimation; and explores the impact of satellite television and the Internet on rural societies and authoritarian governments.
ASNS 2011. Late Imperial China.
Introduction to late imperial China (800 to 1800) as the historical background to the modern age. Begins with the conditions shortly before the Golden Age (Tang Dynasty) collapses, and ends with the heyday of the last imperial dynasty (Qing Dynasty). Major topics include the burgeoning of “modernity” in economic and political patterns, the relation between state and society, the voice and presence of new social elites, ethnic identities, and the cultural, economic, and political encounters between China and the West. Note: This course fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors.
ASNS 2200. Art and Revolution in Modern China.
Examines the multitude of visual expressions adopted, re-fashioned and rejected from China's last dynasty (1644-1911) through the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976). Major themes include the tension between identity and modernity, Westernization, the establishment of new institutions for art, and the relationship between cultural production and politics. Formats under study include ink painting, oil painting, woodcuts, advertisements, and propaganda. Comparisons with other cultures will be conducted to interrogate such questions as: How does art mobilize revolution?
ASNS 2290. Japan: Past and Present.
Surveys Japan’s place in the world by exploring its historical evolution from the emergence of human civilization in the Japanese islands to today, emphasizing along the way the fluid overseas contacts and interactions that have shaped Japanese culture. Topics covered include: the development of centralized government in the Heian Period; the rise and fall of warrior rule in Medieval Japan; the revolutionary political and social changes accompanying the Meiji Restoration and Japan’s integration into the global system; imperialism, militarism and war in the early 20th century; reconstruction and rejuvenation in the postwar; and finally Japan’s recent re-emergence on the global stage.
ASNS 2300. Literature of World War II and the Atomic Bomb in Japan: History, Memory, and Empire.
A study of Japan’s coming to terms with its imperialist past. Literary representations of Japan’s war in East Asia are particularly interesting because of the curious mixture of remembering and forgetting that mark its pages. Postwar fiction delves deep into what it meant for the Japanese people to fight a losing war, to be bombed by a nuclear weapon, to face surrender, and to experience Occupation. Sheds light on the pacifist discourse that emerges in atomic bomb literature and the simultaneous critique directed toward the emperor system and wartime military leadership. Also examines what is missing in these narratives—Japan’s history of colonialism and sexual slavery—by analyzing writings from the colonies (China, Korea, and Taiwan). Tackles the highly political nature of remembering in Japan. Writers include the Nobel prize-winning author Ôe Kenzaburô, Ôoka Shôhei, Kojima Nobuo, Shimao Toshio, Hayashi Kyoko, and East Asian literati like Yu Dafu, Lu Heruo, Ding Ling, and Wu Zhou Liu.
ASNS 2320. Japanese Politics and Society.
Comprehensive overview of modern Japanese politics in historical, social, and cultural context. Analyzes the electoral dominance of the Liberal Democratic Party, the nature of democratic politics, and the rise and fall of the economy. Other topics include the status of women and ethnic minorities, education, war guilt, nationalism, and the role of the media.
ASNS 2554. Theravada Buddhism.
An examination of the major trajectories of Buddhist religious thought and practice as understood from a reading of primary and secondary texts drawn from the Theravada traditions of India, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Burma.
ASNS 2561. Bollywood and Beyond: Indian Cinemas and Society.
Explores Indian films, film consumption, and film industries since 1947. Focuses on mainstream cinema in different regions of India, with some attention to the impact of popular film conventions on art cinema and documentary. Topics include the narrative and aesthetic conventions of Indian films, film magazines, fan clubs, cinema and electoral politics, stigmas on acting, filmmakers and filmmaking, rituals of film watching, and audience interpretations of movies. The production, consumption, and content of Indian cinema are examined in social, cultural, and political contexts, particularly with an eye to their relationships to class, gender, and nationalism. Attendance at weekly evening screenings is required. Note: Fulfills the non-US cinema requirement for Cinema Studies minors.
ASNS 2650. Nation, Religion, and Gender in Indian Epics.
Studies the Indian state-sponsored televised serials of two great Indian epics, the Ramayana and the Mahabharata, and examines their overwhelming popularity among the general public. The aim is to explore issues surrounding the concept of Indian nationhood and its interrelation with the Hindu religion and the position of women in Indian society. Readings include scholarly translations and retellings of the Ramayana and the Mahabharata; selected episodes of the televised epics will be viewed followed by engagement with the public debate through published online media and other sources. One-half credit.

Chinese

CHIN 1101. Elementary Chinese I.
A foundation course for communicative skills in modern Chinese (Mandarin). Five hours of class per week. Introduction to the sound system, essential grammar, basic vocabulary, and approximately 350 characters (simplified version). Develops rudimentary communicative skills. No prerequisite. Followed by Chinese 1102 {102}.
CHIN 1101. Elementary Chinese I.
A foundation course for communicative skills in modern Chinese (Mandarin). Five hours of class per week. Introduction to the sound system, essential grammar, basic vocabulary, and approximately 350 characters (simplified version). Develops rudimentary communicative skills. No prerequisite. Followed by Chinese 1102 {102}.
CHIN 1103. Advanced Elementary Chinese I.
An accelerated course for elementary Chinese designed for heritage speakers and for students who have had some background in Chinese language. Emphasis on improvement of pronunciation, consolidation of basic Chinese grammar, vocabulary enhancement, reading comprehension, and writing. Five hours of class per week and individual tutorials. Followed by Chinese 1104 {104}. Students should consult with the program about appropriate placement.
CHIN 1103. Advanced Elementary Chinese I.
An accelerated course for elementary Chinese designed for heritage speakers and for students who have had some background in Chinese language. Emphasis on improvement of pronunciation, consolidation of basic Chinese grammar, vocabulary enhancement, reading comprehension, and writing. Five hours of class per week and individual tutorials. Followed by Chinese 1104 {104}. Students should consult with the program about appropriate placement.
CHIN 2203. Intermediate Chinese I.
An intermediate course in modern Chinese. Five hours of class per week. Consolidates and expands the knowledge of grammar and vocabulary, with 400 additional characters. Further improves students’ Chinese proficiency with a focus on accuracy, fluency, and complexity. Followed by Chinese 2204 {204}.
CHIN 2203. Intermediate Chinese I.
An intermediate course in modern Chinese. Five hours of class per week. Consolidates and expands the knowledge of grammar and vocabulary, with 400 additional characters. Further improves students’ Chinese proficiency with a focus on accuracy, fluency, and complexity. Followed by Chinese 2204 {204}.
CHIN 2205. Advanced-Intermediate Chinese I.
A pre-advanced course in modern Chinese. Three hours of class per week. Upgrades students’ linguistic skills and cultural knowledge to explore edited or semi-authentic materials. Followed by Chinese 2206 {206}.
CHIN 3307. Advanced Chinese I.
An advanced course in modern Chinese. Three hours of class per week. Designed to develop mastery of the spoken and written language. Emphasis given to reading and writing, with focus on accuracy, complexity, and fluency in oral as well as written expression. Assigned work includes written composition and oral presentations. Repeatable when contents are different.