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Art History

Calendar of Events

Nancy Blum: "Prints, Drawings, and Public Art"

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February 10, 2015 4:15 PM  – 6:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Nancy Blum is the Spring 2015 Marvin Bileck Printmaking Project visiting artist. She received her MFA at Cranbrook Academy of Art and has since been creating and exhibiting extensively in the worlds of printmaking, public art, and drawing.  Her work, which explores the pattern and architecture of nature, has been recognized through such fellowships as the Pollock-Krasner Foundation, Peter S. Reed Foundation, and Mid-Atlantic Arts Foundation. 

She has been an artist in residence and guest lecturer at numerous institutions; her work has been featured in solo exhibitions at galleries and institutions across the US, and in collections as far as Brussels and South Korea.

This event is sponsored by The Marvin Bileck and Emily Nelligan Trust, is presented by the Bowdoin College Visual Arts Department, and is free and open to the public.

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Ramp Gallery Spring Exhibition "Reflections": Reception for Artists and Community

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February 11, 2015 4:00 PM  – 6:30 PM
Hawthorne Longfellow Library, The Ramp Gallery

Curated by Sarah Haimes '15, "Reflections" is a multi-medium installation of written, visual and digital media-based work which explores physical and emotional reflections. The Ramp Gallery is a student-driven curatorial project hosted by the Bowdoin College Library. It provides students with an opportunity to develop a theme and showcase the work of their peers. The results are often culled from across the disciplines.

Hawthorne Longfellow Library basement level, near the Atriums. 

Free and open to the public.

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David Bruce '13: "Cities at Sea" Artist Talk and Gallery Opening

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March 3, 2015 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Edwards Arts Center, Room 115 [Digital Media Lab]

David Bruce was a recipient of the Thomas J. Watson fellowship during the 2012 through 2013 academic year. The exhibition Cities at Sea is the visual journal of drawings, paintings, and sketches that document his fellowship experience, during which he traveled to the Netherlands, Argentina, India, Bangladesh, Indonesia, and Singapore to investigate what densely populated coastal cities are doing to adapt to the water-related threats of climate change. 

Cities at Sea will run from Monday, March 2 through Sunday, March 29, 2015 in the Edwards Center Main Gallery. There will be a reception and artist talk following opening day in the Edwards Digital Media Lab at 7:00pm on Tuesday, March 3. 

This event is sponsored by the Departments of Visual Art and Environmental Studies and is free and open to the public.

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Ido Misato: "Creating Gilded Spaces: Kaisho and the Gilded Folding Screens"

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March 3, 2015 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Searles Science Building, Room 315

In her presentation, Ido Misato explores the meaning of spaces defined by gilded folding screens. A gilded folding screen is a screen for which gold is used as the background, and on which in many cases flowers and/or birds with seasonal landscape are depicted. It was regarded as an important gift and export from Japan to China and Korea; although the form of the folding screen itself originated in China, the gold background was unique to Japan.

Unlike pictures on room partitions, which are architecturally fixed, folding screens are generally portable, which enabled them to create a temporary space as the occasion demanded. Folding screens functioned as borders between interior and exterior spaces and in ritual spaces. Above all, the glittering and gorgeous surface of the gilded screens was suitable for and, indeed, could create extraordinary spaces for religious rituals. The space enclosed by the gold screens could be transformed into an ideal space, if just for a passing moment.

Sponsored by: The Annie Talbot Cole Fund, the Asian Studies Program, and the Art History Department

Misato is the project assistant professor at the Institute of Advanced Study of Asia at the University of Tokyo. She is currently a visiting fellow in the department of East Asian studies at Princeton University.


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Reception: Nancy Blum, Visiting Artist in Residence

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March 5, 2015 4:00 PM  – 6:00 PM
Edwards Arts Center, Room 116 [Gallery]

Artist in Residence Nancy Blum will present her work during a reception hosted by the Bowdoin College Department of Visual Art. 

Nancy Blum received her MFA at Cranbrook Academy of Art and has since been creating and exhibiting extensively in the worlds of printmaking, public art, and drawing.  Her work, which explores the pattern and architecture of nature, has been recognized through such fellowships as the Pollock-Krasner Foundation, Peter S. Reed Foundation, and Mid-Atlantic Arts Foundation. She has been an artist in residence and guest lecturer at numerous institutions; her work has been featured in solo exhibitions at galleries and institutions across the US, and in collections as far as Brussels and South Korea.

This event is free and open to the public. 

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Cristina Malcolmson: 'Studies of Skin Color in the Early Royal Society'

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April 23, 2015 4:30 PM  – 5:30 PM
Massachusetts Hall, Faculty Room

In her most recent book, Studies of Skin Color in the Early Royal Society: Boyle, Cavendish, Swift (Ashgate, 2013), Cristina Malcolmson demonstrates how unstable the idea of race remained in England at the end of the seventeenth century, and yet how extensively the intertwined institutions of government, colonialism, the slave trade, and science were collaborating to usher it into public view.

Arguing that the early Royal Society moved science toward racialization by giving skin color a new prominence as an object of experiment and observation, Malcolmson provides the first book-length examination of studies of skin color in the society. She also brings new light to the relationship between early modern literature, science, and the establishment of scientific racism in the nineteenth century.

Malcolmson, professor of English at Bates College, has also written The 'Empire of Man over the Inferior Creatures': British Women, Race, and Seventeenth-Century Science for The Palgrave History of British Women's Writing, and a collaborative article with Ruth Paley (first author) and Michael Hunter on 'Parliament and Slavery 1660-c.1700' which appeared in the journal Slavery and Abolition in 2010.

Sponsored by the English Department. For more information, contact department coordinator Laurie Holland at 207-725-3552 or lholland@bowdoin.edu.

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