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Thursday, February 16 at 4:30
and
Friday, February 17 at 2:00.
Curatorial Conversations in the Art Museum
Focus & John A. and Helen P. Becker Galleries, Bowdoin College Museum of Art

Insight Out: Exploring Gifts of Art from Private CollectorJoin the student-curators of Insight Out: Exploring Gifts from Private Collectors for a conversation about how they created the exhibition that opened last Friday night. Find out more about what goes on behind the scenes in the Art Museum and the objects in the show. Conversations will be held in the Museum on Thursday, February 16 at 4:30 and Friday, February 17 at 2:00.
Everyone is welcome.
Please come and bring your questions.



Jan 24, 2012 - Apr 15, 2012
Insight Out: Exploring Gifts of Art from Private Collectors
Focus & John A. and Helen P. Becker Galleries, Bowdoin College Museum of Art

Insight Out: Exploring Gifts of Art from Private CollectorThis exhibition celebrates the contributions of private art collectors to Bowdoin since the bequest of James Bowdoin III in 1811. Their many gifts – a few of which have been selected - extend the legacy of James Bowdoin III, expand visual and cultural horizons, and enrich the liberal arts curriculum. Artists featured include James McNeill Whistler, Winslow Homer, Henri Matisse, and Käthe Kollwitz. The show is curated by students in Art History 261: Private Treasures; Public Gifts.



Friday, February 10, 2012
American Artists as Collectors and Tastemakers: Objects, History, and the Imagined Self
Isabel L. Taube, Instructor, School of Visual Arts
Visiting Faculty, Rutgers University

American Artists as Collectors and Tastemakers: Objects, History, and the Imagined Self Isabel L. Taube, Instructor, School of Visual ArtsIsabel Taube teaches art history at the school of Visual Arts, New York. After graduating from Bowdoin in 1992 she served as the Museum of Art's first Mellon Curatorial Intern. Using William Merritt Chase and Walter Gay as examples, she discusses the role of the artist as self-promoter, tastemaker, and interior designer during a period when art and decorative objects too on deep personal significance.
Main Lounge, Moulton Union

7:00 PM Free and open to the public

Sponsored by the Department of Art History and the Student Museum & Art Club (SMAC)



Thursday, February 9, 2012
"Horace Walpole, Strawberry Hill, and the Queerness of Gothic"
Matthew Reeve (Associate Professor of Art History and Queen's National Scholar, Queen's University, Canada)
7 PM, Beam Classroom

Horace Walpole, Strawberry Hill, and the Queerness of GothicScholars have long recognized that the Gothic Revival of the nineteenth century synthesized politics, religion and architecture into a cohesive argument about the supremacy of the medieval past over a debased modern present. It has not been satisfactorily understood that in doing so, the movement profoundly reshaped, obfuscated or erased eighteenth-century modes of viewing and describing the Gothic, in which the style was used as a vehicle for discussions of human alterity. This paper considers one moment in this early history of the Gothic: the building of Horace Walpole's “villa” or castle at Strawberry Hill in Twickenham (London) from 1747. Beginning with the observation that the revival of the Gothic in the early eighteenth century paralleled the codifications of a new sexuality now known as "homosexuality", this paper explores interrelationships between sexuality, taste and the Gothic at Strawberry Hill.



Jay Xu, Director, Museum of Asian Art, San FranciscoFriday, September 9, 2011, 4:30 p.m., Kresge Auditorium:
“‘I come here to rest and to paint a little’: Edward Hopper in Maine”
Carol Troyen, Curator Emerita of American Paintings, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Thursday, September 22, 2011, 4:30 p.m., Kresge Auditorium:
Curator's Lecture in conjunction with the exhibition Along the Yangzi River: Regional Culture of the Bronze Age from Hunan
Jay Xu, Director, Museum of Asian Art, San Francisco
Following the talk, guests are invited to the Museum to attend the fall open house and celebration of the opening of Along the Yangzi River: Regional Culture of the Bronze Age from Hunan


Willow Chang (Director, China Institute Gallery, NYC), organizer of Along the Yangzi River, speaks at the Museum Open House celebrating the exhibition's opening.
Willow Chang (Director, China Institute Gallery, NYC), organizer of Along the Yangzi River, speaks at the Museum Open House celebrating the exhibition's opening.



Alexander Nemerov, Vincent Scully Professor of the History of Art, Yale UniversityFriday, September 23, 2011, 4:30 p.m., Kresge Auditorium:
Lecture in conjunction with Edward Hopper’s Maine
Alexander Nemerov, Vincent Scully Professor of the History of Art, Yale University



Thursday, October 13, 2011, at 4:30 p.m., Kresge Auditorium:
"From Center to Periphery: Regional Culture and Identity in the Ritual Arts of Hunan Province"
Stephen J. Goldberg, Associate Professor of Art History, Hamilton College
Respondent: Ankeney Weitz, Associate Professor of Art and East Asian Studies, Colby College



Gail Levin, Distinguished Professor of Art History at Baruch College and the Graduate School of the City University of New YorkSaturday, October 15, 2011, 4:00 p.m., Kresge Auditorium:
“Edward Hopper in Maine: A Biographer's View"
Gail Levin, Distinguished Professor of Art History at Baruch College and the Graduate School of the City University of New York, Following the talk, guests are invited to the Museum for a reception and guided tours of Edward Hopper’s Maine.



Wednesday, November 9, 2011, at 7:30 PM, Beam Classroom:
"Near Andersonville: Winslow Homer's Civil War"
Peter Wood, Professor Emeritus of History, Duke University



Magnus Fiskesjö, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Cornell UniversityThursday, December 1, 2011, at 4:30 p.m., Kresge Auditorium:
"Passion for the Past: The Significance of Archaeology in China Today"
Magnus Fiskesjö, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Cornell University
Respondent: James Higginbotham, Associate Curator for the Ancient Collection and Associate Professor of Classics, Bowdoin College.

Monday, February 22, 2010
4:15 p.m. in Beam Classroom, Visual Arts Center.
George Adams: "Thirty Years in the Art World."

George Adams is the owner of the George Adams Gallery in New York City, which was originally opened as the Allan Frumkin Gallery in 1959. He started working at the Frumkin Gallery in 1980 and became a partner in 1988.

The George Adams Gallery currently represents 20 artists and estates, several since the early 1960s, and regularly exhibits artists such as Robert Arneson, Elmer Bischoff, Jose Bedia, Joan Brown, Enrique Chagoya, Lesley Dill, Amer Kobaslija, Ron Nagle, Peter Saul and HC Westermann.

Adams attended the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in Maine, and later attended Carnegie-Mellon University and Sarah Lawrence College, concentrating in art history. Between 1974 and 1979 he interned at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Alexander F. Milliken Gallery, New York.

He has juried or acted as contributing curator to exhibitions at the Arkansas Art Center, the Bruce Museum, the Butler Art Institute, and the Columbus (Georgia) Museum, among others. He has also been a lecturer or panelist at the Americas Society, the New School University, College Art Association, the Museum of Fine Arts, Caracas, the School of Art and Design of the University of Illinois, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Yale University Art Gallery.

He currently serves on the board of the Cuban Artists Fund and the Advisory Council at the Loeb Art Center, Vassar College, and is a co-juror for the 2010 Maine Biennial organized by the Maine Center for Contemporary Art.

The lecture is open to the public and admission is free.

Monday, November 16, 2009
4:30 pm, VAC-Beam Classroom
Reception to follow
Open to the public

"BeJoseph A. Booneautiful Boys, Sodomy, Hammams, and other Tropes"

Joseph A. Boone is Professor of English, Gender Studies and Comparative Literature at the University of Southern California and is currently a research fellow at the National Humanities Center in Durham, NC. He is the author of four books, including Queer Frontiers: Millennial Geographies, Genders, Go West and Generations, Libidinal Currents: Sexuality and the Shaping of Modernism, and Engendering Men: The Question of Male Feminist Criticism. Professor Boone is currently researching representations of Homosexuality in the Middle East.
 
Tuesday November 17th at 4 pm Professor Boone is conducting a seminar, but this is not open to the public.
 
Sponsored by Lectures and Concerts, Art Museum/Art History, the English Department, Gay and Lesbian Studies, and Africana Studies

Saturday, November 14, 2009
Art History Bus Trip to Cambridge, MA
Leaves College Street: 8am
Departs Harvard Square: 5pm
$10.00 Reserves your space
Pay to Elizabeth Palmer, Academic Coordinator, Room 207, Visual Arts Center
All Harvard Museums are free on Saturdays if you arrive before noon

Wednesday, October 28, 2009
Professor Nina Rowe, Fordham UniversityProfessor Nina Rowe, Fordham University
Keeping the Jews in Their Place: Images of 'Synagoga' in the High Middle Ages
In the early thirteenth century the motif of Ecclesia and Synagoga – paired female personifications of Church and Synagogue – suddenly started to be included as hinge elements within sculpted decorative programs on cathedral façades across northern Europe. Typically Ecclesia is shown crowned and holding a battle standard; Synagoga is blindfolded and she bears a broken staff. In the simplest terms these paired figures convey the Christian notion of the triumph of Christianity over Judaism or celebrate the advent of the age of grace and the passing of the era of the law. But the early thirteenth century monumental versions of this theme tend to be linked with images of ideal Christian kingship, suggesting a political resonance for the figures as well.

Professor Nina Rowe, Fordham University Keeping the Jews in Their Place: Images of 'Synagoga' in the High Middle AgesIn this lecture, Prof. Rowe will argue that sculpted figures of Synagoga installed in urban centers served to convey an ideal of a docile Judaism that was part of the Christian system but was weakened within it. She will demonstrate this by exploring traditional (Augustinian) notions of the functions of the Jew within Christian history, describing how such ideals were challenged as Jews moved in increasing numbers to the cities of northern Europe in the eleventh and twelfth centuries. The Jews of Aschkenaz were intellectually creative, spiritually and financially strong and often mocked the beliefs and practices of their Christian hosts. She will discuss the celebrated Cloisters Cross (England or Germany, twelfth century) to analyze ways in which the figure of Synagoga was used to vilify Jews using the same terms Jews used to denounce Christians. Her lecture will conclude with a discussion of monumental cathedral sculpture depicting Ecclesia and Synagoga, exploring ways that of the Church triumphant and Judaism defeated conveyed a fantasy of Jewish docility in a correctly ordered Christian domain - an ideal at odds with local realities.
7 PM, Beam Classroom, Visual Arts Center
Free and open to the public


Friday, September 25, 2009
Robert Storr , Critic, Artist, Curator, and Dean of the Yale School of Art
Common Hour Talk:  "Arts Self Sufficiency in a Boom/Bust Artworld"
Robert StorrRobert Robert Storr is a painter, art historian and critic, and prodigious writer about the theory and practice of art. He earned a B.A. at Swarthmore College in 1972 and an M.F.A. at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 1978. He was named dean of the Yale School of Art for a five-year period beginning July 2006 and was the director of the Venice Biennial in 2007, the first American invited to assume that position. From 1990 to 2002 Storr was curator in the Department of Painting and Sculpture at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA). He also organized a number of reinstallations of MoMA's permanent collection, covering such topics as abstraction and the modern grotesque. He has been described as a "vital link between the museum world and academia" and a gifted writer. His regular column, "View from the Bridge," appears in frieze magazine.
Kresge Auditorium, Visual Arts Center

Wednesday, July 23, 2008
Gallery Talk "The Birds and the Beasts in Marriage Pictures"
Unicorns and sirens, horses and dogs, what do images of such creatures convey about love and marriage, beauty and virtue? Please join Susan Wegner for the final gallery talk on the exhibition in the hunt for dozens of horses (winged, wild and armored), numerous dogs (hunting, dancing, and faithfully attending), and a variety of weasels, birds, lions and other beings, real and imagined.
4 PM, Osher and Halford Galleries, Bowdoin College Museum of Art
Susan Wegner is Associate Professor of Art History and Curator of the Exhibition "Beauty and Duty: The Art and Business of Renaissance Marriage" on view through July 27, 2008

Tuesday, May 6, 2008
Jennifer Bird, Visiting Professor of Art History will speak on "Diana and Actaeon's Story on a Renaissance Birth Tray"
Bowdoin College Museum of Art for a gallery talk.
4:15 pm, Osher Gallery, Walker Art Building
Prof. Bird's talk is presented in conjunction with the exhibition Beauty and Duty: The Art and Business of Renaissance Marriage

Friday, April 11, 2008
Jerry Saltz, renowned art critic and columnist, will speak at Common Hour.

Jerry SaltzSaltz's talk is titled "The Good, the Bad, and the Very Bad; A Year in the Life of an Art Critic" and will look at where contemporary art is now, how it got here, and where it might be going. His talk will include slides, not only of paintings and sculptures, but of art openings, after parties, and other scenes less seen by the general public.

Known for his passionate opinions, lively, no nonsense writing, and insights about contemporary art, Saltz has been an active voice in the New York art world for more than two decades. Formerly the senior art critic for The Village Voice, Saltz is currently a columnist for New York magazine.

A three-time nominee for the Pulitzer Prize in Criticism, Saltz was named a finalist in 2000. He was also the sole advisor for the 1995 Whitney Biennial.

He has lectured at Harvard, The Museum of Modern Art, the Guggenheim, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the St. Louis Museum of Art, the Walker Art Center, the Art Institute of Chicago, and many others.

Common Hour is open to all Bowdoin students, faculty and staff.
12:30 p.m. , in Kresge Auditorium, Visual Arts Center.

Charles DempseyWednesday, April 23, 2008
Charles Dempsey
Professor Emeritus, Department of the History of Art, The Johns Hopkins University
The Adornment of Beauty
Robert Lehman Foundation Lecture in conjunction with the exhibition "Beauty and Duty: The Art and Business of Renaissance Marriage." With support from the Jasper Jacob Stahl Lectureship in the Humanities.
Dr. Dempsey is the author of The Portrayal of Love: Botticelli’s Primavera and Florentine Humanist Culture at the Time of Lorenzo the Magnificent.
7:30 pm, Beam Classroom, Visual Arts Center
The event is free and open to the public.
Beauty and Duty: The Art and Business of Renaissance Marriage

Maria RuvoldtWednesday, April 30, 2008
Maria Ruvoldt
Assistant Professor, Department of Art History and Music, Fordham University
A Pageant for a Prince: The Wedding of Francesco de' Medici and Joanna of Austria
With support from the Jasper Jacob Stahl Lectureship in the Humanities Fund and in conjunction with the exhibition "Beauty and Duty: The Art and Business of Renaissance Marriage"

The Italian Renaissance Imagery of Inspiration Metaphors of Sex, Sleep, and Dream Dr. Ruvoldt is the author of The Italian Renaissance Imagery of Inspiration: Metaphors of Sex, Sleep, and Dreams.

7:30 pm, Beam Classroom, Visual Arts Center
Beauty and Duty: The Art and Business of Renaissance Marriage

Thursday, February 7, 2008
Lecture: “Isabella Stewart Gardner”
Linda Docherty
Presented in conjunction with the exhibition, The Walker Sisters and Collecting in Victorian Boston.
7:00 p.m.
Zuckert Seminar Room, Bowdoin College Museum of Art

Tuesday, February 12, 2008 Event Cancelled
Anne Hoehn '76: M.A. Art Historian
It was the Best of Times, It was the Worst of Times
Ms. Hoehn will speak on the impact of the French Revolution on male and female artists in 18th century France.

Thursday, February 28, 2008
Andrew Hare, Supervisory Conservator, Freer & Sackler Galleries,
Smithsonian Institution

Opening the Image: Appreciation and Care of Chinese Scrolls and Albums
Detail of Li Yunzhao (19th c.) Andrew Hare apprenticed at the Usami Shokakudo studio within the Kyoto National Museum Conservation Center for Cultural Properties for ten years before accepting his current position at the Smithsonian Institution. His expertise include the materials, techniques and historic formats for mounting in China and Korea.

Location: TBD 7 pm
The event is free and open to the public.
Visual Culture in the 21st Century
Image: Detail of Li Yunzhao (19th c.) "Five Boys" from an "Album of Sketches". Bowdoin College Museum of Art. Gift of William Bingham II. 1942.039

Konrad EisenbichlerWednesday, March 26, 2008
Konrad Eisenbichler
Professor of Italian and Renaissance Studies, University of Toronto.
Marriage in Renaissance Italy: Patterns, Rituals and Depictions
Dr. Eisenbichler will speak on the variety and diversity of marriage practices in Renaissance Italy, both in practice and in literature, then focus on visual representations of marriage in the arts of the time with a final look at some of the objects associated with marriage.

7:30 pm, Kresge Auditorium in the Visual Arts Center
The event is free and open to the public.
Beauty and Duty: The Art and Business of Renaissance Marriage

Cary Liu, Curator, Asian Art, Princeton University Art MuseumTuesday, April 8, 2008
Cary Y. Liu
Curator, Asian Art, Princeton University Art Museum
Chinese Art and the Art of Calligraphy
A specialist in Chinese art history, Dr. Liu has researched and published on Han dynasty funerary monuments, architecture for the living and the dead,and the art of Chinese calligraphy.

Image: Wang Xizhi (303-361), Ritual to Pray for Good Harvest7 pm, Kresge Auditorium in the Visual Arts Center
The event is free and open to the public.
Visual Culture in the 21st Century
Image: Wang Xizhi (303-361), Ritual to Pray for Good Harvest
Detail from a handscroll, Tang dynasty tracing copy, ink on ying huang paper
Princeton University Art Museum. Bequest of John B. Elliott, Class of 1951 (1998-140)


Wednesday, September 17, 2008
"The Triumph of Wisdom and Fortitude: Rubens's St. Catherine"
A gallery talk by Susan Wegner  in honor of Katy Kline, Director of the Bowdoin College Museum of Art.
The talk will highlight recent gifts to the Bowdoin College Museum of Art, given in honor of Katy Kline, its Director. The talk will cover some of the superb Baroque and 18th-century works given as gifts to the museum during its recent closure for renovation and during its first year of re-opening. Starting with Peter Paul Rubens's imposing print of St. Catherine of Alexandria, the talk will also touch on Rembrandt's intimate etching, The Goldsmith (1655), and the robust 18th-century French painting of St. Mark the Evangelist.
Free and open to the public.
4:00 pm
Halford Gallery in the Bowdoin College Museum of Art


December 6-16th, 2007
Representing America: Ties that Bind and Lines that Divide.
Student-curated exhibition in the Walker Art Building's Zuckert Seminar Room.
Student-led gallery talks will take place Saturday, Dec. 8th at 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. and Tuesday, Dec. 11th at 3:30 p.m.
The exhibition, which examines several thematic representations of American life over 150 years, is the culmination of Professor Linda Docherty's Fall 2007 course "Art and Life." The intensive, hands-on class in art history and museum work brought students into the Museum even before it reopened its doors in October 2007.
Academic Spotlight: Students as Curators: Art and Life Mix it Up

David Lubin, Charlotte C. Weber Professor of Art, Wake Forest UniversityThursday, Sept. 27, 2007
David Lubin, Charlotte C. Weber Professor of Art, Wake Forest University
Art for War's Sake:  WWI and American Visual Culture
Location: TBD 7:30 pm


Professor Lubin teaches courses in the history of art, film, and popular culture. As an undergraduate, Lubin studied filmmaking at the University of Southern California's School of Cinema while reviewing music for Rolling Stone magazine. His books include Act of Portrayal, Picturing a Nation, and Titanic, an in-depth critical analysis of the recent blockbuster. He has lectured at colleges, universities, and art museums throughout the U.S., Europe, and China. His latest book, Shooting Kennedy, examines the photographic portrayal of Jack and Jackie Kennedy from their public courtship in 1953 to the events of Dallas ten years later. In 2004 Lubin was awarded the Smithsonian Institution's Charles Eldredge Prize for "outstanding scholarship in American art."


M.E. Warlick, Associate Professor of Art History, University of DenverWednesday, October 31, 2007
M.E. Warlick, Associate Professor of Art History, University of Denver
The Chemical Wedding: Marriage and Sexuality in the Alchemical Vessel
Location: TBD 4 pm


Ellen Miles, Curator, National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C.Wednesday, October 24, 2007
Ellen Miles, Curator, National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C.
Collection Cameos: Presidential Portraits: Past and Present
Location: TBD 7:30 pm

Ellen G. Miles is Curator and Chair of the Department of Painting and Sculpture at the National Portrait Gallery at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. She recently served as co-curator of "Gilbert Stuart", an exhibition organized jointly by the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the National Portrait Gallery in 2004-2005, and is co-author of the exhibition's catalogue. She holds a PhD in art history from Yale University and is one of this country's leading experts on American portraiture. Among her many publications are Saint-Memin and the Neoclassical Profile Portrait in America, George and Martha Washington: Portraits from the Presidential Years , A Brush with History: Paintings from the National Portrait Gallery, and the essay "Gilbert Stuart's Portraits of George Washington", in George Washington: A National Treasure. In 2002, Dr. Miles was a recipient of a Getty Curatorial Research Fellowship and in 2004 she was selected at the Smithsonian as the Secretary's Distinguished Research Lecturer.

Tuesday, November 13, 2007
Christiane Joost-Gaugier, Art Historian
Collection Cameos:  Nature and the Abstract: Pontormo, Beccafumi and the Early Beginnings of Modern Art
Location: TBD 7 pm

Wednesday, November 15, 2006

Robert Lehman Lecture
Dr. Laurence B. Kanter
Curator-in-Charge, Robert Lehman Collection, The Metropolitan Museum of Art and Lionel Goldfrank III Curator of Early European Art, Yale University Art Gallery

Fra Angelico, Bowdoin College
Scenes from "Il ninfale fiesolano" ("The Nymphs of Fiesole")
tempera on panel, 11 3/8 x 49 13/16 inches.
Bowdoin College Museum of Art

"Boccaccio, Fra Angelico, and Bowdoin: A Problem in Connoisseurship"

7 PM Kresge Auditorium, Visual Arts Center

Link: Campus News: Bowdoin Fra Angelico Panel Included in Met Exhibition

Thursday, October 5, 2006
Anne Dunlop
Assistant Professor of Art History, Yale University
"Petrarch and Painted Love."
This talk examines the links of love, pathology, and early-Renaissance models of painting. It focuses especially on the Chamber of Love in the castle of Sabbionara d'Avio, near Verona, done about 1340. Such a room shows a conception of painting based in the permeability of the body in sight, a conception similar to ideas of love in period. As love acquired a pathology in the early Renaissance, this model of painting was also scrutinized, especially by Petrarch and his circle, and the first theorizations of Alberti and others can be seen partly as defensive reactions.
7 PM, Beam Classroom, Visual Arts Center

Clif Olds: Edith Cleaves Barry Professor of the History & Criticism of Art, EmeritusWednesday, February 15, 2006
Fake! The Art of Forging Art
Clifton C. Olds
Edith Cleaves Barry Professor of the History & Criticism of Art, Emeritus
4:15 pm in Beam classroom, Visual Arts Center.

Thursday, March 2
Lehman Lecture by Daniel Walker, Director, The Textile Museum.








Tuesday, April 11

Lehman Lecture by Richard Davis, Professor of Religion, Bard College.
Lives of Indian Images by Richard H. DavisThe Art of the Procession
Richard Davis is Professor of Religion and Director of the Religion Program at Bard College. His book, "Lives of Indian Images," which won the Ananda K. Coomaraswamy Prize in 1999, examines unexpected and illuminating lives of Hindu and other sculptures as they circulated through time and space encountering new audiences and acquiring different meanings. Prof. Davis continues to do research on the intersections of religion and art.
4 pm in Beam Classroom, Visual Arts Center.



Charles WylieThursday, February 2
Lecture by Charles Wylie, The Lupe Murchison Curator of Contemporary Art, Dallas Museum of Art
The Photographic in the Contemporary Field
Beam Classroom, VAC
7:00 PM




Art History Independent Study Presentation

Performing Otherness: Mythic Beings, Amerindians and Other ConstructsWHO: Senior Elizabeth Mengesha
WHAT: Independent study presentation, "Performing Otherness: Mythic Beings, Amerindians and Other Constructs"
WHEN: Thursday, Dec. 8th 2005 at 4 PM
WHERE: Beam Classroom, Visual Arts Center.
The presentation examines the performance art (and some other forms of art) of Adrian Piper and Coco Fusco. She will discuss the ways these artists address race politics, cultural identity, colonial fantasies, and inter-cultural exchange, among other issues. It should be an interesting presentation.

Wednesday, October 12
AMY McNAIR
Art History / Asian Studies Lecture
4:00 pm Beam Classroom, VAC

November 17, Wednesday, 7:30 p.m., Kresge Auditorium
Lehman Lecture
Larry Silver, Farquhar Professor of History of Art, University of Pennsylvania
Larry Silver: East is EastEast is East
Images of the Turk in German Art of the Reformation Era

During the Renaissance, the empire of the Ottoman Turks posed a grave military and cultural threat to the Christian nations of Europe. Working on the frontiers formed by the Danube River and the Mediterranean Sea, the artists of the Holy Roman Empire were eyewitnesses to this epoch-shaping conflict. This lecture will present late fifteenth- and sixteenth-century imagery that depicts that cultural confrontation. It will discuss works by Albrecht Dürer and other celebrated artists of the period, who sought (either through on-site inspection or through their imaginations) to represent Turks in peace and war. A close inspection of such works reveals that they comprise a range of western responses to the Ottoman threat, at times dealing with the Turkish "Other" by means of ethnographic and geographic exactitude, on other occasions picturing a demonized and alien enemy. In short, the western attitudes towards Islam that these works display offer intriguing - and instructive - parallels to present-day concerns.


Past speakers have included:

David P. Becker:
"Fact and Fantasy in the Art of Rodolphe Bresdin"
David P. Becker:


  • psychologist Howard Gardner
  • art historians Marvin Eisenberg and Albert Elsen.
  • Linda Nochlin
  • Svetlana Alpers
  • David P. Becker: "Fact and Fantasy in the Art of Rodolphe Bresdin"
  • Arthur Danto
  • Leo Steinberg
  • Mary Ellen Miller
  • Peter Schjeldahl
  • Clifford Ackley
  • Stephen Addiss.

Thursday. October 14
"Fact and Fantasy in the Art of Rodolphe Bresdin" by David P. Becker, Independent Curator and Scholar. Sponsored by the Bowdoin College Museum of Art.

Wed. Sept. 15
Stephen Perkinson "French Painting Begins with a Portrait: Nationalism and the History of Portraiture in France, from 1350 to the Present"
Faculty Seminar Series
Main Lounge, Moulton Union
12:00-1:00 p.m.

September 30, Monday, 7:00 p.m., Kresge Auditorium
Howard Gardner, psychologist.
"Good Work in Education"
Brodie Lecture for Education, Art History co-sponsor

Lehman Lecture Fall 2004October 18, Monday, 7:30 p.m., Kresge Auditorium
Lehman Lecture
Natalie Kampen, Ann Whitney Olin Professor of Women's Studies & Art History, Barnard College
Gender and Family in Late Antique Art (300-500 C.E.)

October 27, Wednesday, 7:30 p.m., Kresge Auditorium
Vincent Katz, author , Editor of Black Mountain College: Experiment in Art, MIT Press, 2003
"Journey To Black Mountain"
Discussion, in part, of his personal involvement with Black Mountain, how that evolved, as well as, certainly, a discussion of how he sees the importance of the institution in the development of Modernist ideas in American art. He would discuss how the philosophy of the institution affected all the arts at Black Mountain, and what lessons we may be able to take from that philosophy today.


Robert Lehman Lectureship Program
In the mid-1980s the Robert Lehman Foundation awarded a generous grant to Bowdoin to fund the Robert Lehman Lectureship Program.

The Lectureship enriches the curriculum in Art History and Visual Arts and adds significantly to the co-curricular life of the college and the community through presentations by noted art historians, art critics and artists. This extraordinary grant from the Lehman Foundation opens a window on the current international art world and makes the research of distinguished scholars accessible to a wide audience. When the Foundation inaugurated the lectureship at Bowdoin, it stated its intent "to provide a general audience with increased knowledge, appreciation, and enjoyment of the visual arts." The Department of Art carries out this charge by sponsoring from one to as many as five lectures a year.

The first speakers invited for the 1985-86 academic year, who offered three different perspectives on the concept of artistic creativity, were psychologist Howard Gardner, art historians Marvin Eisenberg and Albert Elsen.

Other past lecturers have included: Linda Nochlin, Svetlana Alpers, Arthur Danto, Leo Steinberg, Mary Ellen Miller, Peter Schjeldahl, Clifford Ackley, and Stephen Addiss.