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Exhibits
Donald B. MacMillan. Two Eskimos in Kayaks, Killiniq Island, 1934. Gift of Donald and Miriam MacMillan.
“I will only tell what I know”: Them Days, Stories of Early Labrador
November 30, 2000 - March 11, 2001
Arctic Museum main galleries
Them Days, a magazine of Labrador history, has been published continuously since 1975, in the process becoming an important archive for oral, written and photographic records of Labrador. In the early 1980s, The Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum provided copies of many of MacMillan’s photographs of Labrador to the magazine to be included with articles. In this exhibit we present a selection of these photographs, along with quotes from the articles they accompanied in the magazine. True to the rich history of Labrador, these include stories from Inuit, Innu and Settler families, as well as visiting scientists and missionaries.

The generous support of the Friends of Bowdoin College has made this exhibit possible.
<p><b>Mannassee and Miriam Fox</b> </p>  I’m not going to talk about things about which I am ignorant, I will only tell what I know. There were some villages north of Nain and some around here which had their own stories to tell, each trying to be better than the other, sometimes getting along and also many things happening to them. <br> <br>  Mannasse Fox “People of Ikkilsinguvik”, Them Days 21(1):38-48, Fall 1995.  <br> <br>   Donald B. MacMillan. Eskimo Couple Recently Married, Nain, 1929. Gift of Donald and Miriam MacMillan.
<p><b>A Prosperous Community</b> </p>  The first part of July and August were fishing seasons. I can remember those things though I was just a child. In those days they used to jig for codfish. Even the women worked at the fish. When August came they would dry the fish so that it would be ready when the <em>Harmony</em> arrived. <br>  Kitora Boas “The Survivors”, Them Days 11(3):48-52, March 1986.  <br> <br>  Donald B. MacMillan. Eskimo Fishing Boats Racing, Okak, 1931. Gift of Donald and Miriam MacMillan.

<p><b>Spanish Flu at Okak, 1918</b> </p>  When the <em>Harmony</em> arrived there was no sickness in Okak. All the people helped out with the unloading of the cargo and then all the fish caught at Okak that summer had to be loaded on board. After the <em>Harmony</em> departed there was a church service. There was a lot of us at that service. The very next day though, there was a Communion service and there were very few of us because people were already ill. It was so sudden.<br> <br>  Kitora Boas “The Survivors”, Them Days 11(3):48-52, March 1986.  <br> <br>  Donald B. MacMillan. Eskimo Family, Okak, 1911-12. Gift of Donald and Miriam MacMillan.
<p><b>Kayaks</b> </p>  I didn’t make the kayak myself. I have watched them being made. They used to split a big tree into two halves and take the branches off. I don’t know how many seal skins were used, I think it may have been five or six. Once they split the tree down the middle the wood would be boiled and bent until they would look like ribs. <br> <br>  Herman Daniel “Kayaks”, Them Days 19(4):30-31, July 1994. <br> <br>  Donald B. MacMillan. Two Eskimos in Kayaks, Killiniq Island, 1934. Gift of Donald and Miriam MacMillan.

<p><b>Snowmobiles</b> </p>  I can remember very very well when the shout went up, because it was dark, around five o’clock, and there were two big headlights shining around the southern point, coming towards us... And here was the snowmobile with Captain Mac coming to celebrate New Years with the people of Nain.<br><br>  Kate Hettasch “Snowmobile in Labrador!”, Them Days 11(2):41-43, December 1985.  <br><br>  Donald B. MacMillan. Snowmobile Hauling Wood to Camp, Anetalak Bay, 1928. Gift of Donald and Miriam MacMillan.
<p><b>Airplanes</b> </p>  I am sending a new radio set to you by Comdr. MacMillan, who is going to have an aeroplane up there, in which he intends to fly to Europe and back, so you will probably have a lot of thrills this summer.<br> <br>  Letter from Eugene McDonald (Zenith Radio Corporation) to Sam Broomfield, Labrador, Them Days 22(1):30, Fall 1996.  <br><br>  Donald B. MacMillan. Snowmobile Hauling Wood to Camp, Anetalak Bay, 1928. Gift of Donald and Miriam MacMillan.

<p><b>Innu at Davis Inlet </b> </p>  There is no text associated with this image in the issue in which it is published, but in other issues, people talk about the Innu at Davis Inlet:<br> They have mukushan [boiled crushed caribou bone] all together in a big bucket. All the people come to mukushan – men, women and kids…After they have mukushan they start to hang up the  drum. The old men start to sing and everybody starts to dance…That’s what they would eat at Christmas, mukushan. They brought it in to old Davis Inlet and they would have a dance. That was a long time ago.<br> <br>  Tshenish Pasteen “Christmas” Them Days 22(2):68-70, Winter 1997[text].<br> <br>  Davis Inlet Group, Them Days 10(4):16, June 1985 [photograph].  <br><br>  Donald B. MacMillan. Nascopie Indians, Davis Inlet, 1927-28. Gift of Donald and Miriam MacMillan.
<p><b>Akat Rich</b> </p>  Joe and Akat Rich were two of anthropologist W. D. Strong’s informants when he did field work among the Innu as part of MacMillan’s 1927 expedition to Labrador. <em>Them Days</em> published extracts from his journal in 1991. <br><br>  For tanning, according to Akat Rich, a small tent is made of the skin. Inside is rotten wood with coals from the stove. Skin is tanned in about an hour and a half to two hours.<br> <br>  William Duncan Strong “Deer” Them Days 16(3):3-11, April , 1991.  <br><br>  Donald B. MacMillan. Nascopie Indians, Davis Inlet, 1927-28. Gift of Donald and Miriam MacMillan.

<p><b>Joe Rich</b> </p>  A corral was made in the winter time and men, behind, drove the deer into the V made by the women and children…Men shoot them [deer] with guns and bows and arrows. Sometimes as many as five hundred are caught. Joe Rich saw this once when he was a little boy. Akat (Agat) helped at such drives. <br> <br>  William Duncan Strong “Deer” Them Days 16(3):3-11, April , 1991.  <br><br>  Donald B. MacMillan. Joe, A Nascopie Indian, Anetalak Bay, 1927-28. Gift of Donald and Miriam MacMillan.
<p><b>John Voisey </b> </p>  I can’t remember when Uncle John Voisey left the bay, not me, I wasn’t born yet I suppose. I know before he come to Nain and worked for the Hudson’s Bay Company he left from right up in the bay and went 12 miles outside to a place called Killutok, the island there is called John’s Island after him…Before Uncle John came to Nain he made his livin’ off huntin’ and fishin’.<br> <br>  Jim Voisey “Voiseys of Voisey’s Bay” Them Days 18(3):6-11, April 1993.  <br><br>  Donald B. MacMillan. John Voisey, Nain, 1927-34. Gift of Donald and Miriam MacMillan.

<p><b>Home in Voisey’s Bay</b> </p>  Before Dad had the sawmill they used to saw all their lumber with a pit saw. That’s how they built the house, like if the wood was only split, logs split in two fish them together and then chinch the seams with white coloured moss, dry it and then seal it inside and outside. Warm, oh that house was warm.<br> <br>  Alice Anderson “Voiseys of Voisey’s Bay” Them Days 18(3):12-18, April 1993. <br><br>  Donald B. MacMillan. Voisey’s House, Voisey Bay, 1927-34. Gift of Donald and Miriam MacMillan.
<p><b>The Gears of Labrador</b> </p>  My daddy, John, married a partly Inuit woman, Tabea Pamack…My mother had my sister Rosie before she married my father and then they had me and Alec. After our parents died in Okak in 1918, Uncle Tom Gear took me and Alec because we were his brother’s children. <br> <br>  Margaret Gear Saunders “Gears of Labrador” Them Days 18(1):34-37, October 1992.  <br><br>  Donald B. MacMillan. Tom Gear, Anetalak Bay, 1929. Gift of Donald and Miriam MacMillan.

<p><b>Margaret Gear</b> </p>  Uncle Tom married Bella Lane and they never had any children. Aunt Bella was the one that reared me, oh she was wicked, but that was the style in them days…After Aunt Bella died Uncle Tom married Maria Dickers, her father was Herbert Dickers. Uncle Tom and Aunt Maria had two children, Ted and Selma. <br> <br>  Margaret Gear Saunders “Gears of Labrador” Them Days 18(1):34-37, October 1992.  <br><br>  Donald B. MacMillan. The Gear Girl, Anetalak Bay?, 1929. Gift of Donald and Miriam MacMillan.
<p><b>Newfoundland Fishermen</b> </p>  The <em>Kyle</em> started her journey usually leaving St. John’s around the May 24th holiday… picking up fishermen, stationers as they were referred to in that time…So the number would be around three hundred and forty, perhaps four hundred would load on that ship and make its way through the ice infested waters all along the northern Newfoundland and into Labrador. <br> <br>  Earl Winsor “The KYLE was Many Things to Many People” Them Days, 9(4):50-55. June 1984.  <br><br>  Donald B. MacMillan. Newfoundland Fisherman Bound Home in the Fall of the Year, 1927-34. Gift of Donald and Miriam MacMillan.

<p><b>Fishing Schooners</b> </p>  Them times ‘twas schooners, any time of the day you could see a half dozen schooners sailin’ up or down. I’ve seen it so high as 36 the one time in Francis Harbour Bight. You could walk up and down the harbour, almost, from schooner to schooner. Beautiful…Oh, they was lovely vessels. <br> Ben Rowe “Ben Rowe” Them Days 20(3): 48, Spring 1995.  <br><br>  Donald B. MacMillan. Fishing Fleet, Assizes Harbour, 1934. Gift of Donald and Miriam MacMillan.
<p><b>Medical Missions to Labrador</b> </p>  I worked in the hospital here then for two years, that’s the old hospital not the new one here now. The first year I got $300 a year. That was duty all the time, around the clock. I had to be there all the time no matter how busy it was or wasn’t. There was no doctor at the hospital…The only nurses there were me and Gran Paddon. <br> <br>  Florence Michelin “Florence Goudie RN” Them Days 18(4):32-37, July, 1993.  <br><br>  Donald B. MacMillan. The Grenfell Hospital, Northwest River, 1922. Gift of Donald and Miriam MacMillan.

<p><b>The Hudson's Bay Company</b> </p>  Rigoulette is the chief station of the Hudson’s Bay Company in Labrador…The white settlers and mixed population living at and around this important trading post are reckoned at from two to three hundred….But besides the settlers there are more than seventy Eskimos living up this long fjord..<br> <br>  “Attempts to Establish a Moravian Mission at Rigolet” extracted from Moravian Periodical Accounts. Them Days 22(1):14-22, Fall, 1996.  <br><br>  Donald B. MacMillan. Rigolet, 1931. Gift of Donald and Miriam MacMillan.