Spring 2015 Calendar of Events

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Film: 'For the Rights of All: Ending Jim Crow in Alaska'

February 5, 2015 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

In observance of Black History Month the Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum and Arctic Studies Center presents the film, For the Rights of All: Ending Jim Crow in Alaska.

This one-hour, award winning documentary reveals the true-life story of an extraordinary Alaskan woman who becomes an unlikely hero in the fight for civil rights. Like Native Americans in the lower forty-eight states, Alaska Natives struggled to keep their basic human rights, as well as protect their ancient ties to the land. The Bill of Rights did not apply to them.

Elizabeth Peratrovich, a young Tlingit woman and mother of three, testified before the Alaska Territorial Senate in 1945 and swayed their vote with her compelling testimony in favor of the Anti-Discrimination Act, the first civil rights bill passed in the U.S. since the Civil War.


Free and open to the public.

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Second Annual World Cinema Festival: 'God Loves Uganda' - with Hanetha Vete-Congolo and Laura Premack

February 18, 2015 7:00 PM  – 10:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

As an American-influenced bill to make homosexuality punishable by death wins widespread support, tension in Uganda mounts and an atmosphere of murderous hatred takes hold. This film reveals the conflicting motives of faith and greed, ecstasy and egotism, among Ugandan ministers, American evangelical leaders and the foot soldiers of a theology that sees Uganda as ground zero in a battle for billions of souls. Through verité, interviews, and hidden camera footage – and with unprecedented access – God Loves Uganda takes viewers inside the evangelical movement in both the US and Uganda.

Presented by Hanétha Vété-Congolo, Associate Professor of Romance Languages and Laura Premack, Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow of Latin American Studies, God Loves Uganda (Roger Ross Williams, US, 2013), is a NY Times Critic’s Pick, winner of the Inspiration Award at the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival, and official selection at Sundance, HotDocs, and AFI Docs. 

Bowdoin’s World Cinema Festival offers a varied program of important contemporary narrative and documentary films from around the world with post-screening discussions moderated by faculty and students.

The public is welcomed at no charge and tickets are not required.

The 2nd Annual World Cinema Festival is sponsored by the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund, the Latin American Studies Program, the Asian Studies Program, the African Studies Program, the Russian Department, the German Department, the Romance Languages Department, the English Department, MacMillan House, the Bowdoin Film Society, and the Cinema Studies Program.

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CANCELLED - Cristina Malcomson: "Studies of Skin Color in the Early Royal Society"

February 19, 2015 4:30 PM  – 5:30 PM
Massachusetts Hall, Faculty Room

THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED DUE TO WEATHER.
For more information, contact the English Department coordinator at 725-3552 or lholland@bowdoin.edu.

In her most recent book, Studies of Skin Color in the Early Royal Society: Boyle, Cavendish, Swift (Ashgate, 2013), Cristina Malcolmson demonstrates how unstable the idea of race remained in England at the end of the seventeenth century, and yet how extensively the intertwined institutions of government, colonialism, the slave trade, and science were collaborating to usher it into public view. Arguing that the early Royal Society moved science toward racialization by giving skin color a new prominence as an object of experiment and observation, Malcolmson provides the first book-length examination of studies of skin color in the society. She also brings new light to the relationship between early modern literature, science, and the establishment of scientific racism in the nineteenth century.

Malcolmson,  professor of English at Bates College, has also written The 'Empire of Man over the Inferior Creatures': British Women, Race, and Seventeenth-Century Science for The Palgrave History of British Women's Writing, and a collaborative article with Ruth Paley (first author) and Michael Hunter on 'Parliament and Slavery 1660-c.1700' which appeared in the journal Slavery and Abolition in 2010.

Sponsored by the English Department

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Portland Playback Theater: "Letting the World In: Stories of Discovery"

February 26, 2015 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

The Portland Playback Theater comes to campus for a wonderful evening of storytelling and improv theater! This troupe of highly-trained, multi-talented actors featuring Erin Curren, visiting lecturer in French, will "playback" audience stories of discovery, difficulty, culture, realization and more. The group joins the art of improvisation with real-life stories spontaneously shared by members of the audience. Using movement, dialogue and music, the actors seek to honor the countless moments and events that shape our lives. 

Portland Playback Theatre Company was founded in Portland, Maine in 2005. The Playback Theatre style models transformation; a new way to relate to the world. When trained playback practitioners enact a story told by a member of the audience, a deep bond of understanding is established between the “teller” and the audience. Playback helps people see their common humanity. When people join together in sharing their stories and watching the re-enactments, it engenders an ability to focus on commonalities rather then judgments of otherness.  

Hosted by the Off Campus Study office, along with the McKeen Center and other offices on campus.

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Dancer and Choreographer Chantal Loïal: 'On t'appelle Venus (They Call You Venus)'

February 28, 2015 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

In her performance piece, On t'appelle Venus, choreographer and dancer Chantal Loial pays tribute to Sawtche (1789-1819), known as the Black Venus, who had been brought to France in the nineteenth century by a "tamer" who prostituted her and exploited her as a circus freak. Swatche's body, deemed abnormal, fascinated the European imagination. After she died, scientists dissected her body and displayed it at the Musee de l'Homme in Paris, all in the name of scientific and anthropological progress. Through this artistic expression of her body, Chantal Loial invites us to think of feminine body and the norms we use to draw laws about both the body and beauty.

Loial created her dance company in 1994. She began dancing her native Afro-Guadeloupean traditional dances at age seven and went on to become a professional choreographer and dancer, earning her diploma in contemporary dance at the National Dance Centre of Pantin, France in 2008. She reinterprets traditional Caribbean and African dances that she mixes with European ballet and other forms of dance. In 2014, Loïal received the highest French Order, the National Order of the Legion of Honor for her work in the Arts (Knight of the Legion of Honor).

Open to the public free of charge.

For more information, contact Hanétha Vété-Congolo at mvete@bowdoin.edu.

Sponsored by the Andrew Mellon Foundation (Mellon Humanities Initiative).

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Hester Blum: "Polar Imprints: The News from the Ends of the Earth"

March 2, 2015 6:00 PM  – 7:30 PM
Hubbard Hall, Thomas F. Shannon Room [208]

Narratives of polar voyages enjoyed wide circulation in Anglo-American cultural and political spheres during the long nineteenth century. Yet the familiar travel accounts of adventurous voyage and their fictional counterparts were not the only forms of literary production generated by Arctic and Antarctic exploration. Many expeditions brought a surprising piece of equipment aboard ship: a printing press. With such presses, polar-voyaging sailors wrote and printed newspapers, broadsides, plays, and other reading matter beyond the Arctic and Antarctic Circles; these publications were produced almost exclusively for a reading audience comprised of the expedition’s crew members. 

In this presentation, Hester Blum, associate professor of English at Pennsylvania State University, will examine the first printed polar newspapers. What does this drive toward what she calls “extreme printing” tell us about the state of print culture and coterie publication in the nineteenth century Anglo-American world? Her talk will be attentive to the rhetorical distance between mass-published voyage accounts, and the coterie publications produced and circulated aboard ship. 'Polar Imprints' is attuned to the tension between the global ambitions of polar voyages, and the remarkably circumscribed conditions of their practice.

Sponsored by Africana Studies, Arctic Studies, and the English Department.

Free and Open to the Public

Note: This talk will also be live streamed on Bowdoin’s Live Webcasts page.

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Kimberly Juanita Brown: "Afterimages of History: The Poetics of Photography in the Contemporary"

March 24, 2015 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Dr. Kimberly Juanita Brown considers the fraught terrain of word and image in the twentieth-century construction of black identity. Marking painful historical moments that both frame and extend the parameters of racialized existence, Brown seeks to reconcile the import and utility of African American art practices heavily dependent on the visual. Using works from Audre Lorde, Michael S. Harper, and Lucille Clifton alongside photographs by Roy DeCarava and Carrie Mae Weems, she will explore the layered contingency of imagery within the arena of black subjectivity.

Dr. Brown is currently a lecturer on studies of women, gender, and sexuality at Harvard University. Her research and teaching gather at the intersection of critical race theory and visual culture studies. Her book (forthcoming from Duke University Press), The Repeating Body: Slavery's Visual Resonance in the Contemporary examines contemporary representations of slavery that emphasize the repetition of black women's corporeal practices in the aftermath of the event of slavery. A second project, Their Dead Among Us: Photography, Melancholy, and The Politics of the Visual, will explore the photographic dispossession of the body of the other and patterns of exclusion engendered by these ocular practices.

Sponsored by the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund, Departments of Art History and Africana Studies, and Bowdoin College Museum of Art

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Craig Steven Wilder, Russwurm Lecture: 'Ebony and Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America's Universities'

March 31, 2015 6:30 PM  – 8:30 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

Craig Steven Wilder, professor of history at MIT and a leading historian of race in America, will deliver the annual John Brown Russwurm Lecture in the Main Lounge of Moulton Union. A reception in the Russwurm House Library will precede the lecture at 5:00pm. Both events are free and open to the public. 

Professor Wilder will examine the contrasting figures of "the matriculating Indian" and "the uneducable Negro" to explore the limits on access to higher education in the second half of the 18th century. Looking closely at the experiences of two friends, the Reverend Samson Occom - a member of the Mohegan nation who became a Presbyterian minister, and poet Phillis Wheatley - the first African-American woman to be published, Professor Wilder will demonstrate how illusory were even the modest hopes of education held by Native and enslaved Americans. Though hailed by well-wishers as possessors of exceptional talents, Occum and Wheatley could find no institutional structures that would support them in intellectual, literary, or religious pursuits. 

This lecture stems from Wilder's important and widely reviewed new study, Ebony and Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America's Universities, where he argues that many of America's revered colleges and universities were soaked in the sweat, the tears, and sometimes the blood of people of color.

Professor Wilder is a senior fellow at the Bard Prison Initiative, where he has served as a guest lecturer, commencement speaker, academic advisor, and visiting professor. For more than a decade, this innovative program has given hundreds of men and women the opportunity to acquire a college education during their incarcerations in the New York State prison system. 

He has advised and appeared in numerous historical documentaries, including the celebrated Ken Burns, Sarah Burns, and David McMahon film, The Central Park Five; Kelly Anderson's highly praised exploration of gentrification, My Brooklyn; the History Channel's F.D.R.: A Presidency Revealed; and Ric Burn's award-winning PBS series, New York: A Documentary History

Named after the first African-American graduate of Bowdoin College (class of 1826), the John Brown Russwurm lecture series explores "the legacy and status of Black Americans". Notable speakers include Robert Levine, Lani Guinier, Carl Stokes, Vernon Jordan, Shirley Chisholm, Bayard Rustin, Benjamin Hooks, and Julian Bond, among others.


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Lisa Yaszek: "Afrofuturism as Global Science Fiction?"

April 1, 2015 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

Lisa Yaszek explores the global aspects and movement of science fiction over the past two centuries through the focusing lens of Afrofuturism. As a mode of aesthetic practice characterized by the use of science fictional tropes and narrative technique to investigate the necessary relations of science, technology, and race, Afrofuturism has been deployed by artists across media to recover lost African and Afrodiasporic histories and to imagine rich, racially-diverse worlds of tomorrow that oppose the white-washed futures implicit in much first-world scientific and economic rhetoric. 

Yaszek begins her talk with a brief overview of Afrofuturism and its
relation to genre science fiction. She then considers the evolution of
Afrofuturism from its roots in nineteenth-century African-American utopian and military fiction to its integration with mid-twentieth- century Western science fiction and its current spread across the Atlantic seaboard and Africa itself. Taken together, the stories, films, and comics produced by black men and women over the past 200 years demonstrates both the global nature of race relations in the modern era and the centrality of science and technology to the production of these relations.

Lisa Yaszek is a professor of science fiction studies a the School of Literature, Media and Communication at Georgia Tech, where she also serves as the director of the SciFi@Tech. She is the past president of the Science Fiction Research Association, and her research interests include science fiction, cultural history, critical race and gender studies, and science and technical studies. Her books include Galactic Suburbia: Recovering Women's Science Fiction, (Ohio State University Press, 2008), and she co-edited the Configurations special double issue on science fiction author Kim Stanley Robinson (Winter-Spring 2012), among other publications. She is currently completing an anthology on women's work in the early science fiction community and serving as associate producer for the science fiction film Rite of Passage.

This event is open to the public and is free of charge.

For more information, contact Arielle Saiber (asaiber@bowdoin.edu).

Sponsored by the Departments of Romance Languages, English and Africana Studies and the Cinema Studies Program.

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Noliwe Rooks: "Because What is Beautiful is Good: Erasing Race and Selling Feminism in the Dove Campaign for Real Beauty"

April 6, 2015 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

  • This talk explores the role that Black women played at the beginning and the end of the first international Dove brand "real beauty" campaign and how and why that campaign used feminism as an advertising tool. Noliwe Rooks is currently an Associate Professor in Africana Studies and Feminist, Gender, Sexuality Studies at Cornell University where she is also the Director of Graduate Studies in Africana Studies. She is an interdisciplinary scholar whose work explores the racial implications of beauty, fashion and adornment as well as the way race and gender both impact and are impacted by popular culture, social history and political life in the United States. Rooks is the author of three books. The first, Hair Raising: Beauty, Culture and African American Women (1996, Rutgers University Press) won both the 1997 Choice Award for Outstanding Academic Book, and the Public Library Associations 1997 award for Outstanding University Press Book. Her second book, Ladies Pages: African American Women's Magazines and the Culture that Made Them (Rutgers University Press) was published in 2004. Her most recent book, White Money/Black Power: African American Studies and the Crises of Race in Higher Education was published in 2006 with Beacon Press. She has two forthcoming edited collections: "Black Fashion: Gender. Art. Politics" a special issue of NKA: Journal of Contemporary Art, Duke University Press, Fall 2015, No. 37 and Women and Magazines in the 21st Century: Race, Writing and New Media (Under Consideration). Her current book project is about the politics of race and economics of K-12 education in the United States and tentatively titled, Apartheid in America and Why it Matters That We Have Reached the Beginning of the End of Public Education. Open to the public free of charge. For more information, contact Hanetha Vete-Congolo at mvete@bowdoin.edu. Sponsored by the Andrew Mellon Foundation (Mellon Humanities Initiative). <strong>Note: This talk will also be live streamed on Bowdoin?s&nbsp;<a href="http://www.bowdoin.edu/live/">Live Webcasts page</a>.</strong>

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Zaheer Ali: "From Malcolm Little to El Hajj Malik Shabazz: A Journey of Faith"

April 7, 2015 6:00 PM  – 8:00 PM
Searles Science Building, 315

Most discussions of Malcolm X's life tend to emphasize his politics and downplay the role of religion in his life. Or, if they do address his religion, these examinations often see Islam as something that Malcolm truly embraces only after leaving the Nation of Islam and making his hajj (pilgrimage) to Mecca. This talk examines the ways that religion in general, and Islam in particular, figured very early in Malcolm's life, and provided a passport for his growing internationalist politics.

Zaheer Ali is a PhD candidate in history at Columbia University. Under the direction of the late Manning Marable, he served as one of the project managers and a senior researcher of the Malcolm X Project (MXP), a multi-year research initiative on the life and legacy of Malcolm X.

Free and open to the public.

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Ambassador Thomas Pickering '53, H'84: "Civil War to Civility: Bowdoin's Sons and Ending Strife-Then and Now"

April 9, 2015 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Memorial Hall, Pickard Theater

Ambassador Thomas Pickering holds the personal rank of career ambassador, the highest in the United States Foreign Service. Over five decades, he served as the United States ambassador to the Russian Federation, India, Israel, El Salvador, Nigeria and the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan. In 2005, Ambassador Pickering became the fourteenth recipient of the Bowdoin Prize, the College's highest honor. In his presentation, "Civil War to Civility: Bowdoin's Sons and Ending Strife-Then and Now", he will speak about the peace reached on April 9, 1865 as part of the College's commemoration of the end of the Civil War.

Open to the public, free of charge.  

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Brian Mello: "The End of the Liberalized Autocracy in the Middle East and North Africa"

April 13, 2015 7:30 PM  – 9:30 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

Prior to the events of the Arab Spring, it was believed that controlled liberalization and the emergence of hybrid authoritarian regimes?what scholar Daniel Brumberg termed liberalized autocracies?contributed to authoritarian stability in the Middle East and North Africa.  

In this talk, Brian Mello challenges these assumptions by identifying a set of causal mechanisms that emerged within liberalized autocracies that help to explain why the wave of protest in the Arab Spring began in and contributed to regime change primarily in such hybrid regimes. He concludes by examining what this wave of contentious politics might mean for the future of liberalized autocracy and democracy in the region.

Brian Mello is Associate Professor of Political Science at Muhlenberg College. He is author of Evaluating Social Movement Impacts: Comparative Lessons from the Labor Movement in Turkey(2013, Bloomsbury Academic). 


Note: This talk will also be live streamed on Bowdoin?s Live Webcasts page.

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Anne Sarah Rubin: "Through the Heart of Dixie: Sherman's March and American Memory"

April 16, 2015 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Hubbard Hall, Thomas F. Shannon Room [208]

Sherman's March, cutting a path through Georgia and the Carolinas, is among the most symbolically potent events of the Civil War. In this presentation, Anne Sarah Rubin uncovers and unpacks stories and myths about the March from a wide variety of sources, including African Americans, women, Union soldiers, Confederates, and even Sherman himself. Drawing her evidence from an array of media, including travel accounts, memoirs, literature, films, and newspapers, Rubin uses the competing and contradictory stories as a lens into the way that American thinking about the Civil War has changed over time.

Anne Sarah Rubin is associate professor of history at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.

Part of the Enhancing the Humanities at Bowdoin Civil War Era Cluster.

Note: This talk will also be live streamed on Bowdoin?s Live Webcasts page.

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Special Chapel Service: "God's Trombones" Worship Service and Tribute to James Weldon Johnson

April 19, 2015 7:00 PM  – 8:00 PM
Bowdoin Chapel, Chapel

Sunday's chapel service will be a special worship service and tribute to James Weldon Johnson entitled "God's Trombones" in the Bowdoin Chapel. James Weldon Johnson (1871-1938) was a civil rights leader, poet, founder of the NAACP, professor, song writer, and diplomat.

Three preachers will lead the worship service and include Rev. Dr. H. Roy Partridge of Bowdoin College, the Rev. Kenneth I. Lewis Jr. of the Green Memorial AME Zion Church, and Bishop Steve Coleman of the Williams Temple Church of God in Christ. 

The Green Memorial Gospel Choir and Band and Bowdoin College students will offer anthems throughout the service. There will be a reception and refreshments at the conclusion of the service in the McKeen Center.

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Studies of Skin Color in the Early Royal Society: A Conversation with Cristina Malcolmson

April 23, 2015 4:30 PM  – 5:30 PM
Massachusetts Hall, Faculty Room

In her most recent book, Studies of Skin Color in the Early Royal Society: Boyle, Cavendish, Swift (Ashgate, 2013), Cristina Malcolmson demonstrates how unstable the idea of race remained in England at the end of the seventeenth century, and yet how extensively the intertwined institutions of government, colonialism, the slave trade, and science were collaborating to usher it into public view.

Arguing that the early Royal Society moved science toward racialization by giving skin color a new prominence as an object of experiment and observation, Malcolmson provides the first book-length examination of studies of skin color in the society. She also brings new light to the relationship between early modern literature, science, and the establishment of scientific racism in the nineteenth century.

Malcolmson, professor of English at Bates College, has also written The 'Empire of Man over the Inferior Creatures': British Women, Race, and Seventeenth-Century Science for The Palgrave History of British Women's Writing, and a collaborative article with Ruth Paley (first author) and Michael Hunter on 'Parliament and Slavery 1660-c.1700' which appeared in the journal Slavery and Abolition in 2010.

Sponsored by the English Department. For more information, contact the English Department at 725-3552 or lholland@bowdoin.edu.

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Nadia Celis, Book Presentation: "The Rebellion of the Girls. The Caribbean and 'Corporeal Conscience'"

April 28, 2015 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Massachusetts Hall, Faculty Room

Join Nadia Celis, associate professor of Spanish, for the celebration of her book La Rebelion de las ninas: El Caribe y la 'conciencia
corporal' 
(The Rebellion of Girls: The Caribbean and 'Corporeal
Consciousness') 
Madrid, Frankfurt: Iberoamericana Vervuert, 2015).

A study of the representation of girlhood in the work of Hispanic Caribbean women writers, The Rebellion is also a critique of the multifaceted relation of power and gendered bodies in Caribbean cultures. Combining feminist theory with Caribbean and cultural studies, Celis contextualizes the struggle for "a body of one's own" engaged by the protagonists of novels from the 1940's to the turn of the 21st century. 

Challenging dominant associations of childhood narratives with nostalgia or lost innocence, Celis sets the spotlight on the desire, anger, and the bodily expressions girls deploy to contest the patriarchal appropriation of their sexuality. These girls' embodied subjectivities inspire the coining of "corporeal consciousness" to name the force at the core of liberatory practices preceding and coexisting with the sanctioned performances of femininity faced by fictional and real girls. 

"A powerful and innovative work. Celis selected a precise and persuasive corpus that exposes how patriarchal politics work on girls' bodies and sexualities both in the ways girls incorporate and reproduce the logics of male desire in their bodies and gestures, and in the ways they subvert these parameters. A magnificent book that makes substantial contributions not only to the field of Caribbean studies but also to the study of Latin American gender culture." (Beatriz Gonzalez-Stephen, Rice University).

Students and colleagues will lead an open conversation about the book, and light refreshments will be served. 

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Panel Discussion: "What is Boko Haram? Why Should We Care?"

April 30, 2015 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Hubbard Hall, Thomas F. Shannon Room [208]

Boko Haram is a radical Sunni Islamic sect, originally calling itself Jama'atu Ahlis Sunnar Lidda'awati Wal-Jihad, "people committed to the propagation of the Prophet's teachings and jihad." The group's more widely known name of Boko Haram means "Western education is sin." While initially non-violent and preaching a doctrine of withdrawal from what they perceived as a corrupt Nigerian state, they now increasingly engage in confrontation and deadly attacks on a wide range of targets.

Join us for an informative panel discussion among professors with professors from Bowdoin and University of Massachusetts, Boston. 

  • Ericka Albaugh, Assistant Professor of Government (Bowdoin). She teaches courses on Africa, language politics, development and state-building. She has researched in Cameroon, Senegal, and Ghana, and her more recent explorations focus on violence and language spread in West Africa more broadly.
  • Daren Kew, Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Conflict Resolution, Human Security, and Global Governance in the McCormack Graduate School, and Executive Director of the Center for Peace, Democracy, and Development at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. He has researched and consulted on the prevention of conflicts in Nigeria and elsewhere, highlighting in particular the role of religious civil society groups in promoting peace and democratization.
  • Scott MacEachern, Professor of Anthropology (Bowdoin). He has directed archaeological research projects in different countries in Africa and North America, but much of his research since the mid-1980s has taken place around the Mandara Mountains of northern Cameroon and Nigeria. His main research interests are in state formation processes in Africa, the archaeological studty of ethnicity and social boundaries, and African and global historical genetics.

Note: This talk will also be live streamed on Bowdoin?s Live Webcasts page.

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Bishop Yvette Flunder: "Reconciling Spirituality and Sexuality - Growing the Radically Inclusive Church"

May 1, 2015 12:30 PM  – 2:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Bishop Yvette Flunder discusses the idea that trying to establish a relationship with a God that barely tolerates you but cannot truly accept and certainly will never celebrate you can do incredible damage to ones self esteem. She examines the tortured historical and theological view that suggests that some people are just flawed or born to be the underclass and should never expect to be on God's 'A list', and how that has been the convenient method used to hold women, immigrants, the poor and LGBT people in chains of self-depreciation.

Flunder is Founder and pastor of the City of Refuge United Church of Christ in Oakland, California, and presiding bishop of the Fellowship of Affirming Ministries. She is also an ordained minister of the United Church of Christ and a graduate of the Ministry Studies and Master of Arts programs at the Pacific School of Religion, Berkeley, California. She received a Doctor of Ministry degree from San Francisco Theological Seminary in San Anselmo, California. Her Doctor of Ministry project provided a framework for her work in the AIDS and transgender communities and for her activism in marriage equality.

Free and open to the public.

Sponsored by Africana Studies, Gay & Lesbian Studies, the Office of Religious and Spiritual Life, the Resource Center for Sexual and Gender Diversity, and the department of Religion.