Spring 2013 Calendar of Events

Lecture - O.O. Howard and African American Mutual Aid During Reconstruction

Lecture - O.O. Howard and African American Mutual Aid During Reconstruction

April 25, 2013 6:00 PM  – 7:30 PM
Hawthorne Longfellow Hall, Nixon Lounge

Gretchen Long, Associate Professor of History at Williams College
During the Civil War and the earliest years of Freedom, African Americans-soldiers, laborers, women, and children suffered from remarkably high rates of disease and death. War and displacement largely destroyed systems of medical care and public health that slaves had relied on during the Antebellum era. Gretchen Long describes the various creative ways that African Americans went about securing medical care and advocating for themselves and their families. In correspondence with government officials, army officers and negotiations with former masters, freedpeople tried, with mixed success to gain admission to hospitals and access to doctors and medicines. Long will discuss exchanges between African Americans and O.O. Howard, Bowdoin class of 1850 and Commissioner of the Freedmen's Bureau. 
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
Sponsored by Africana Studies, History, and the Russwurm Lectures Fund

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James Smalls, Art Historian - Feral Benga: An African Muse of Homo-Utopia

James Smalls, Art Historian - Feral Benga: An African Muse of Homo-Utopia

April 18, 2013 4:30 PM  – 6:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

University of Maryland, Baltimore County art historian James Smalls will speak on the influence of the Senegalese dancer and artist/model Feral Benga on early to mid-twentieth century queer visual representation.

Smalls writes on representations of homosexuality in Western art, with a focus on the intersections of race, gender, and queer sexuality in the art and visual culture of the nineteenth century, as well as the art and visual culture of the black diaspora.

He is the author of Homosexuality in Art (Parkstone Press, 2003) and The Homoerotic Photography of Carl Van Vechten: Public Face, Private Thoughts (Temple University Press, 2006). He has published essays in a number of prominent journals, including American Art, French Historical Studies, Third Text, Art Journal, and Art Criticism.

Sponsored by Lectures and Concerts, the Gay and Lesbian Studies Program, the English Department, the Art History Department, and the Africana Studies Program.

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Bowdoin and the Civil War at 150

Bowdoin and the Civil War at 150

April 3, 2013 4:30 PM  – 6:30 PM
Searles Science Building, Room 315

From the penning of Harriet Beecher Stowe's famous novel Uncle Tom's Cabin on Federal Street in 1853 to Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain's famous bayonet charge at Gettysburg in 1863, Bowdoin boasts well-known connections to the Civil War. In commemoration of the sesquicentennial anniversary of the war, two Bowdoin history alumni whose research expertise unites College history and the Civil War will return to the College to participate in a symposium exploring the relationship between the war and Bowdoin.

For more information see the history department website.

Sponsored by the History Department, Africana Studies Program, the Phyllis Marshall Watson Fund, and Bowdoin College Lectures and Concerts Fund.

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"The Central Park Five" Screening and Panel Discussion

March 28, 2013 6:00 PM  – 10:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

In 1989, five black and Latino teenagers from Harlem were arrested and later convicted of raping a white woman in New York City's Central Park. They spent between 6 and 13 years in prison before a serial rapist confessed that he alone had committed the crime, leading to their convictions being overturned.

Set against a backdrop of a decaying city beset by violence and racial tension, The Central Park Five will tell the story of that horrific crime, the rush to judgment by the police, a media clamoring for sensational stories and an outraged public, and the five lives upended by this miscarriage of justice.

The screening will be followed by a panel discussion with the documentary's producers and director - Sarah Burns and David McMahon; History Professor Craig Wilder of MIT, the documentary's consultant; and Raymond Santana, one of the accused.

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"The Political Aesthetics of Drag": Talk by Shaka McGlotten

March 26, 2013 7:30 PM  – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Shaka McGlotten is an anthropologist and Associate Professor of Media, Society, and the Arts at Purchase College-SUNY. He teaches about digital culture and new media, and studies how media technologies intersect with ideologies of gender, sexuality, and race.

In his public lecture, The Political Aesthetics of Drag , Professor McGlotten will consider drag more broadly as a possible model for nourishing aesthetic forms that creatively respond to the constraints of modern nation-states. From underground dance clubs to galleries and political protests, he contends that these and other theatrical modes of cross-dressing simultaneously operate both at the margins of cultural production and at its centers. Ultimately, these performers, as well as the aesthetic value of their spectacularly staged gender crossings, form part of the larger whole of queer cultural histories as well as globally circulating ideas about queer difference. In the end, Professor McGlotten argues that these theatrical performances are an aesthetic product that invites its participants and audiences to reconsider notions of personal and collective autonomy.

Brought to you by Gay and Lesbian Studies, Africana Studies, and the departments of English and Sociology & Anthropology

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The Interrupters Film screening and discussion

The Interrupters Film screening and discussion

February 28, 2013 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

The Interrupters tells the moving and surprising stories of three Violence Interrupters who try to protect their Chicago communities from the violence they once employed. From acclaimed director Steve James and bestselling author Alex Kotlowitz, this film is an unusually intimate journey into the stubborn persistence of violence in our cities. Shot over the course of a year out of Kartemquin Films, The Interrupters captures a period in Chicago when it became a national symbol for the violence in our cities. During that period, the city was besieged by high-profile incidents, most notably the brutal beating of Derrion Albert, a Chicago High School student, whose death was caught on videotape.

The film's main subjects work for an innovative organization, CeaseFire. It was founded by an epidemiologist, Gary Slutkin, who believes that the spread of violence mimics the spread of infectious diseases, and so the treatment should be similar: go after the most infected, and stop the infection at its source. One of the cornerstones of the organization is the "Violence Interrupters" program, created by Tio Hardiman, who heads the program. The Interrupters - who have credibility on the streets because of their own personal histories - intervene in conflicts before they explode into violence.

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Land Grabs in Tanzania: the scramble over nature, food and fuel (Jen Jones)

Land Grabs in Tanzania: the scramble over nature, food and fuel (Jen Jones)

February 20, 2013 1:00 PM  – 2:00 PM
Adams Hall, Room 111 (Common Room)

Tanzania is rich in natural resources, from the Serengeti plains, to the lush forests of Kilimanjaro, and the mangroves & coral reefs of Zanzibar. This natural wealth has contributed to sustained economic growth over the past decade, yet it has not translated into better well-being for the majority of people. Evidence suggests the rich are getting richer and the poor are getting poorer. Land grabs are one contributing factor to the uneven distribution of benefits. Large swaths of land are being captured by external actors and used for nature conservation, tourism & hunting, biofuel production, carbon credits, and export agriculture. As a result, local people are being displaced from ancestral lands and losing access to resources vital for their livelihoods.

What is driving the scramble for land in Tanzania and who are the winners and losers? What roles do foreign policy and notions of poverty alleviation play in shaping the development landscape? How are international actors, such as conservation BINGOs (Big International Nongovernmental Organizations), multilateral development agencies (i.e. World Bank), and private companies influencing land use change? How are communities navigating these challenges of neoliberal globalization for the 21st century?

Dr. Jennifer Jones is a political ecologist who uses a transdisciplinary approach to explore the relationships between people and other elements of nature. She is Program Director for the International Honors Program Beyond Globalization: Reclaiming Nature, Culture and Justice, and is a Visiting Associate Professor at the Center for Leadership in Global Sustainability at Virginia Tech. Dr. Jones received her Ph.D. from the University of Pretoria.

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Sweet! Sweet! / Come, Come and Eat / Dear Little Girls / With Yellow Curls: Race and the Queer History of Eating in the Nineteenth Century - A Talk by Kyla Wazana Tompkins

Sweet! Sweet! / Come, Come and Eat / Dear Little Girls / With Yellow Curls: Race and the Queer History of Eating in the Nineteenth Century - A Talk by Kyla Wazana Tompkins

February 13, 2013 4:30 PM  – 6:30 PM
Massachusetts Hall, Faculty Room

Kyla Wazana Tompkins's talk asks us to consider the mouth as a sensory space, one that offers insight into new ideas of sex and sexuality in circulation in nineteenth-century America, and that invites new ways to think about embodiment, materiality and race. Engaging children's literature and early advertising culture, Tompkins discusses eating as an act that points to the mouth as not simply a passageway but as a place even a stage where transgressive and normative desires are acted out and displayed.

The act of eating is both erotic and violent, as one wholly consumes the object being eaten. At the same time, eating performs a kind of vulnerability to the world, revealing a fundamental interdependence between the eater and that which exists outside her body. Racial Indigestion (New York University Press, 2012), Tompkins' first book, explores the links between food and visual and literary culture in the nineteenth-century United States to reveal how eating produces political subjects by justifying the social discourses that create bodily meaning.

Tompkins is an Associate Professor of English and Gender Studies at Pomona College, and a former food writer and restaurant critic. She writes about food, eating, sexuality, race and nineteenth- and twentieth-century literature, culture, film, and dance.

Learn more at Tompkins's site, Racial Indigestion.

Sponsored by the English Department and the Africana Studies Program.

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Maine State House Representative Craig Hickman discusses King's Legacy: Family, Community, Prosperity

Maine State House Representative Craig Hickman discusses King's Legacy: Family, Community, Prosperity

February 6, 2013 7:00 PM  – 8:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Representative Craig Hickman was elected in 2012 to represent District 82 covering his hometown of Winthrop and neighboring Readfield, making him only the second African American to serve in the Maine House of Representatives. He is a presidential elector for the state of Maine, an award-winning author, a tennis blogger, and an organic farmer. Hickman graduated from Harvard University with a bachelor?s degree in government. Together with his partner, he operates the Annabessacook Farm Bed & Breakfast and Organic Farm Stand. Representative Hickman campaigned on ending hunger, eliminating regulations for small farms and businesses, and investing in sustainable energy. In 2013 the College will honor Martin Luther King Jr.'s legacy by creating dialogue around the ideas central to King's legacy-the creation of the Beloved Community through collective non-violent struggle to combat poverty.

Co-sponsored by the Department of English, Department of Government and Legal Studies, Africana Studies, Gay and Lesbian Studies, Bowdoin College Democrats, Bowdoin Queer Straight Alliance, African-American Society, Food Co-op, Green Bowdoin Alliance, the Joseph McKeen Center for the Common Good, Sustainable Bowdoin, the Center for Sexual and Gender Diversity, and the Office of Multicultural Student Programs.

Open to the public. No tickets required. For more information call 207-725-3149.

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Michael Birenbaum Quintero presents: Community-building and Ethnomusicological Practice in the Afro-Colombian Hinterlands

Michael Birenbaum Quintero presents: Community-building and Ethnomusicological Practice in the Afro-Colombian Hinterlands

January 29, 2013 12:00 PM  – 1:00 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

FACULTY SEMINAR SERIES

Michael Birenbaum Quintero, Assistant Professor of Music is the featured speaker. His talk is titled Community-building and Ethnomusicological Practice in the Afro-Colombian Hinterlands.

Open to faculty and staff.
Buffet lunch $3, or bring your own lunch.

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A Celebration of the Life and Legacy of Martin Luther King Jr.

A Celebration of the Life and Legacy of Martin Luther King Jr.

January 21, 2013 7:00 PM  – 8:00 PM
Bowdoin Chapel, Chapel

This campus celebration will feature performances by Bowdoin students, an invocation by Director of Religious and Spiritual Life Robert Ives, and a short reflection on Dr. King's life and legacy by Brian Purnell, assistant professor of Africana Studies.

Students will perform select readings, songs, and spoken word around themes central to Dr. King's legacy--the creation of the Beloved Community through collective non-violent struggle to combat poverty.

The program will include a piano prelude, Franz Liszt's Widmung (Liebeslied, S. 566, of Robert Schumann, performed by Allen Wong Yu '14; an invocation by Director of Religious and Spiritual Life Robert Ives; a performance by the Bowdoin Community Gospel Choir; a poetry reading by Daniel Eloy '15; Lift Every Voice and Sing performed by Alexis Little '14; the Longfellows performing MLK by U2; and a silent contemplation of an excerpt from a King speech.

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Children's Celebration of Martin Luther King

Children's Celebration of Martin Luther King

January 21, 2013 10:30 AM  – 12:00 PM
Thorne Hall, Daggett Lounge

The Bowdoin College Library presents their annual "A Children's Celebration of Martin Luther King Jr."

Children's book authors Margy Burns Knight, Anne Sibley O'Brien, and Rohan Henry, as well as songwriter Josephine Cameron, will present a program of illustrated storytelling, music, and crafts in remembrance of Dr. King.

The celebration is geared toward children ages 5 and up. Admission is free and refreshments will be served. Copies of selected titles by each presenter will be available for purchase.

For more information contact the Bowdoin College Library, 207-725-3155. In the case of inclement weather, call 207-725-3000, option 3, for event information.

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